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Today’s front page, Thursday, February 15, 2024

Business Mirror

Yes to death penalty?

  • Atty. Lorna Patajo-Kapunan
  • February 4, 2019
  • 5 minute read

The death penalty in the Philippines was first abolished in 1987, making the Philippines the first country in Asia to terminate death penalty. Yet, in less than a year, with the promulgation of a new Constitution after the ouster of the Marcos dictatorship, the military establishment lobbied for its imposition to combat the alleged intensifying offensives of the Communist Party of the Philippines/New People’s Army guerillas.

In mid-1987, a bill to reinstate the death penalty was submitted to Congress, citing recent right-wing coup attempts as example of the alarming deterioration of peace and order. In 1988, the House of Representatives passed the bill that was being promoted as a counterinsurgency bill. When an ex-military officer, Gen. Fidel Ramos, was elected president in 1992, Republic Act 7659 restoring the death penalty was signed into law. Political offenses, such as rebellion, were dropped from the bill; however, the list of crimes was expanded to include economic offenses such as smuggling and bribery. In 1996, RA 8177 was approved, stipulating lethal injection as the method of execution. Six years after its reimposition, the number of death-penalty convicts increased—indicating that the death penalty is not a deterrent to criminality. Certain studies cite statistics indicating that there are no signs that criminality has gone down with the reimposition of the death penalty ( https://www.phlsol.nl/AOOa/Pahra-death-penalty-maroo.htm ):

1) From 1994 to 1995 the number of persons on death row increased from 12 to 104. From 1995 to 1996 it increased to 182. In 1997 the number of death convicts was at 520, and in 1998 the number of inmates in death row was at 781. As of November 1999 there were a total of 956 death convicts at the National Bilibid Prisons and at the Correctional Institute for Women.

2) As of December 31, 1999, based on the statistics compiled by the Episcopal Commission on Prisoner Welfare of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines, there were a total of 936 convicts interned at the National Bilibid Prisons and another 23 detained at the Correctional Institute for Women. Of these figures, six are minors and 12 are foreigners.

3) A review of death-penalty cases made by the Supreme Court from 1995 to 1999 indicated that two out of every three death sentences handed down by the local courts were found to be erroneous by the Supreme Court. Out of the 959 inmates the SC reviewed, 175 cases were reviewed from 1995 to 1999; three cases were reviewed in 1995, eight in 1996, eight in 1997, 38 in 1998 and 118 in 1999. Of the 175 cases, the SC affirmed with finality and first affirmation only 31 percent or 54 cases involving 60 inmates. Of these cases, 24 were affirmed with finality, while the remaining 36 were given first affirmation. Sixty-nine percent or 121 cases were either modified, acquitted or remanded for retrial.

4) A study prepared by the Free Legal Assistance Group (FLAG) on the results of the review of cases done by the Supreme Court “point all too clearly to the imperfections, weaknesses and problems of the Philippine justice system.” Some decisions of the trial courts were overturned for imposing death penalty on offenses that were not subject to death penalty. Other decisions of the lower courts were set aside because of substantive and procedural errors during arraignment and trial. Still others were struck down because the lower court misappreciated evidences.

5) Data from the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines showed that in 1998 more than half of the convicts earned less than the government-mandated minimum wage. In a survey conducted among 425 convicts in 1998, 105 or 24.7 percent were agricultural workers, 103 were construction workers, 73 were transport workers, and 42 were workers in sales and services. Only 6 percent finished college, while 32.4 percent finished various levels of high school, while the remaining convicts did not go to school or have finished only elementary or vocational education.

On June 24, 2006, then-President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, apparently giving in to the call of the Catholic Church, signed into law RA 9346, “An Act Prohibiting the Imposition of Death Penalty in the Philippines.” All crimes punishable by death were commuted to life imprisonment (reclusion perpetua).

Mayor Rodrigo Duterte, then candidate for president, said in one of the presidential debates that he wants capital punishment for criminals involved in illegal drugs, gun-for-hire syndicates and those who commit “heinous crimes,” such as rape, robbery or car theft where the victim is murdered. He vowed “to litter Manila Bay with the bodies of criminals.” Sen. Grace Poe then also stated that the capital punishment should apply to criminals convicted of drugs and multiple crimes where involved people can no longer be rehabilitated.

Following the election of Mayor Duterte as president, a bill to reinstate capital punishment for certain heinous offenses was swiftly reported out of the Justice Committee into the full House of Representatives in February 2017. The death penalty bill died in the Senate.

The recent surge in heinous crimes—terrorist bombings, drug trafficking, plunder, rape, murders, extrajudicial killings, smuggling, kidnaping for ransom, gun for hire —has opened the discussion on reinstating the death penalty. Tabloids, which widely publicize horrific crimes in the front pages, reinforce public fears that lawlessness and criminality have reached unprecedented levels. Certain senatorial candidates (e.g., Raffy Alunan, Harry Roque) in a recent CNN debate indicated a “Yes” vote for the restoration of death penalty.

Is death penalty the antidote to crime? Will criminals be afraid to commit a crime if they see that the government is determined to execute them? Oppositors have cited several studies debunking the deterrence theory.

I agree! What would prevent people from committing crimes is the certainty of apprehension, speedy prosecution and, if warranted, conviction. At present, severe imperfections in our justice system, where justice can be bought, could likely result in a situation where the innocent, who cannot afford the services of adequate legal counsel due to poverty, might be executed. I prefer a discussion on the “pros” and “cons” of reinstituting the death penalty—rather than a debate on lowering the age of criminal liability to 12. I shudder at the thought that our children could be “death eligible” if the death penalty were imposed!

In the midst of a strong outcry from citizens who want the government to stop criminality, let the response be genuine, effective and equitable reforms in our Criminal Justice System. The Five Pillars of the Criminal Justice System—(1) The Community, (2) The Law Enforcement, (3) The Prosecution, (4) The Courts and (5) Corrections —should function like a chain of links. A weakness in any of these links breaks the chain, resulting in a breakdown of the system, inordinate delays in the proceedings, acquittal of the guilty and conviction of the innocent.

But the biggest problem would be, in my view, a people that have become cynical, indifferent, callous, frustrated, hardened and uncaring. This is one of the bigger challenges facing this government.

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Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines Argumentative Essay

Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines Argumentative Essay

The author discusses the issue of justice and the increasing number of crimes that are not being solved. They mention the death penalty, which is a difficult decision in a Catholic country like the Philippines where life is considered sacred. However, the author believes it may be necessary to take action beyond what society is used to in order to address the issue. The author suggests revising or updating constitutional laws, such as the age of those who can be imprisoned after being proven guilty of a crime. The author believes it is time for leaders to be firm in their decisions and actions and as a student, they will support these decisions.

Cases occur every second, whether in the country or worldwide, causing people to question justice and bringing problems and suffering, particularly for victims. The death penalty is carried out using an electric chair, where proven suspects or criminals are executed by electricity within seconds. Being predominantly Catholic, the Philippines strictly upholds moral standards.

As a teenager, I am confronted with the challenging choice of whether or not to endorse the death penalty. Although my parents consistently emphasize the value and sanctity of life, the growing amount of unresolved crimes has influenced me towards supporting its execution. I strongly believe that it is imperative to surpass our conventional approaches and take decisive measures. If accepting or embracing this idea is unattainable, I sincerely desire a revision or alteration of our constitutional laws.

The issue of minimum age for imprisonment is urgent because children as young as 10 are engaging in criminal activities without facing any consequences, leading to a disregard for laws. It is crucial for our leaders to take decisive measures to tackle this problem. As a student, I am dedicated to fully supporting their decisions.

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Amnesty International Logotype

DEATH PENALTY

We know that, together, we can end the death penalty everywhere..

Every day, people are executed and sentenced to death by the state as punishment for a variety of crimes – sometimes for acts that should not be criminalized. In some countries, it can be for drug-related offences, in others it is reserved for terrorism-related acts and murder.

Some countries execute people who were under 18 years old when the crime was committed, others use the death penalty against people with mental and intellectual disabilities and several others apply the death penalty after unfair trials – in clear violation of international law and standards. People can spend years on death row, not knowing when their time is up, or whether they will see their families one last time.

The death penalty is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. Amnesty opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception – regardless of who is accused, the nature or circumstances of the   crime, guilt or innocence or method of execution.

Amnesty International holds that the death penalty breaches human rights, in particular the right to life and the right to live free from torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Both rights are protected under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the UN in 1948.

Over time, the international community has adopted several instruments that ban the use of the death penalty, including the following:

• The Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty. • Protocol No. 6 to the European Convention on Human Rights, concerning the abolition of the death penalty, and Protocol No. 13 to the European Convention on Human Rights, concerning the abolition of the death penalty in all circumstances. • The Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights to Abolish the Death Penalty.

Although international law says that the use of the death penalty must be restricted to the the most serious crimes, meaning intentional killing, Amnesty believes that the death penalty is never the answer.

The death penalty is a symptom of a culture of violence, not a solution to it.

Execution Methods

• Beheading • Electrocution • Hanging • Lethal injection • Shooting

WHERE DO MOST EXECUTIONS TAKE PLACE?

In 2022, most known executions took place in China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the USA – in that order.

China remained the world’s leading executioner  – but the true extent of its use of the death penalty is unknown as this data is classified as a state secret; the global figure of at least  883  excludes the thousands of executions believed to have been carried out there.

Excluding China, 90% of all reported executions took place in just three countries – Iran, Saudi Arabia and Egypt.

The global view: death sentences and executions 2008-2022

*This map indicates the general locations of boundaries and jurisdictions and should not be interpreted as Amnesty International’s view on disputed territories.

**Country names listed reflect nomenclature in May 2023

Juvenile Executions

The use of the death penalty for crimes committed by people younger than 18 is prohibited under international human rights law, yet some countries still sentence to death and execute juvenile defendants. Such executions are few compared to the total number of executions recorded by Amnesty International each year.

However, their significance goes beyond their number and calls into question the commitment of the executing states to respect international law.

Since 1990 Amnesty International has documented at least 149 executions of child offenders in 10 countries: China, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Sudan, Sudan, the USA and Yemen.

Several of these countries have changed their laws to exclude the practice. Iran has executed more than twice as many child offenders as the other nine countries combined. At the time of writing Iran has executed at least 99 child offenders since 1990.

Executions per year

Amnesty International recorded at least 657 executions in 20 countries in 2018, down by 5% from 2018 (at least 690 executions). This figure represents the lowest number of executions that Amnesty International has recorded in at least a decade.

Death sentences per year

Amnesty International recorded at least 2,307 death sentences in 56 countries in 2019, a slight decrease from the total of 2,531 reported in 2018. At least 26,604 people were known to be under sentence of death globally at the end of 2019.

HOW MANY DEATH SENTENCES AND EXECUTIONS TAKE PLACE EACH YEAR?

Death sentences.

Amnesty International recorded at least 2,052 death sentences in 56 countries in 2021, an increase of 39% from the total of 1,477 reported in 2020. At least 28,670 people were known to be under sentence of death globally at the end of 2021.

Amnesty International recorded at least 579 executions in 18 countries in 2021, up by 20% from 2020 (at least 483 executions). This figure represents the second lowest number of executions that Amnesty International has recorded since at least 2010.

Reasons to abolish the death penalty

It is irreversible and mistakes happen. Execution is the ultimate, irrevocable punishment: the risk of executing an innocent person can never be eliminated. Since 1973, for example, more than 160 prisoners sent to death row in the USA have later been exonerated or released from death row on grounds of innocence. Others have been executed despite serious doubts about their guilt.

It does not deter crime. Countries who execute commonly cite the death penalty as a way to deter people from committing crime. This claim has been repeatedly discredited, and there is no evidence that the death penalty is any more effective in reducing crime than life imprisonment.

It is often used within skewed justice systems. In many cases recorded by Amnesty International, people were executed after being convicted in grossly unfair trials, on the basis of torture-tainted evidence and with inadequate legal representation. In some countries death sentences are imposed as the mandatory punishment for certain offences, meaning that judges are not able to consider the circumstances of the crime or of the defendant before sentencing.

It is discriminatory. The weight of the death penalty is disproportionally carried by those with less advantaged socio-economic backgrounds or belonging to a racial, ethnic or religious minority. This includes having limited access to legal representation, for example, or being at greater disadvantage in their experience of the criminal justice system.

It is used as a political tool. The authorities in some countries, for example Iran and Sudan, use the death penalty to punish political opponents.

What is Amnesty doing to abolish the death penalty?

For 40 years, Amnesty has been campaigning to abolish the death penalty around the world.

Amnesty monitors its use by all states to expose and hold to account governments that continue to use the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. We publish a report annually, reporting figures and analysing trends for each country. Amnesty’s latest report, Death Sentences and Executions 2019, was released in April 2020.

The organisation’s work to oppose the death penalty takes many forms, including targeted, advocacy and campaign based projects in the Africa, Asia-Pacific, Americas and Europe and Central Asia region; strengthening national and international standards against its use, including by supporting the successful adoption of resolutions on a moratorium on the use of the death penalty by the UN General Assembly; and applying pressure on cases that face imminent execution. We also support actions and work by the abolitionist movement, at national, regional and global level.

When Amnesty started its work in 1977, only 16 countries had totally abolished the death penalty. Today, that number has risen to 106 – more than half the world’s countries. More than two-thirds are abolitionist in law or practice.

In the Philippines

More than a decade ago, the Philippines recognized that the capital punishment is the ultimate violation of the right to life by abolishing the Republic Act 7659, later ratifying the Second Optional Protocol to the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights which further emphasized the cruel and inhuman nature of capital punishment. Since the start of President Duterte’s term in 2016 however, he has sought to reinstate the death penalty, and almost succeeded when the House of Representatives voted to pass the bill in 2017.

Today, we call on the Philippine Senate to reject any and all proposals for the reinstatement of the death penalty. Call on our Senators to recognize that the death penalty fails as a deterrent to any form of crime and contributes to a culture that continually devalues life.

Recorded executions skyrocket to highest figure in five years

The death penalty is an inhumane, unlawful and ineffective response to drugs, death penalty myths debunked.

Parliamentarians for Global Action

PGA’s vision is to contribute to the creation of a Rules-Based International Order for a more equitable, safe, sustainable and democratic world.

Philippines and the Death Penalty

Although the Philippines was the first Asian country to abolish the death penalty under the 1987 Constitution, it was re-imposed during the administration of President Fidel Ramos to address the rising crime rate in 1993, only to be abolished again in 2006, after the then President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo signed a law reducing maximum punishment to life imprisonment. The country subsequently signed and ratified the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty (ICCPR-OP2) on 20 November 2007.

The May 2016 election of President Rodrigo Duterte, who vowed to reintroduce the death penalty to combat drug trafficking in the Philippines and other crimes during his campaign, posed a new serious threat to the protection of human rights in the country. On 7 March 2017, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed Bill No. 4727 on the reinstatement of the death penalty for drug-related and “heinous” crimes. The Bill, however, remained stalled in the Senate for the following months due to a lack of support from Senators, including several PGA Members who publicly spoke out against the reintroduction of capital punishment in the country.

Yet, the mid-term elections of May 2019, which gave a majority to senators from President Duterte’s party (PDP-Laban), relaunched the pro-death penalty movement, and 18 concerning bills on this matter were presented to the House of Representatives in September that same year. Although unsuccessful, other attempts were made again in 2020, following a shooting in Tarlac .

On 2 March 2021, the House of Representatives adopted House Bill No. 7814 , allowing the reintroduction of the death penalty under the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002 – the second bill in five years proposing a return to capital punishment that passed to the Senate. But support from Senators who previously positioned themselves in favor of such reinstatement diminished, thus reducing the risk of a return to the use of capital punishment.

Overall, vigilance must prevail, notably considering the coming to power of Ferdinand ‘Bongbong’ Marcos Junior as President and Sara Duterte as Vice President following the presidential elections of May 2022. The threat of a possible reintroduction of the death penalty in the Philippines remains latent.

The Philippines has ratified both the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) in 1986 and its Second Optional Protocol aiming at the abolition of the death penalty (ICCPR-OP2) in 2007 .

PGA activities on the abolition of the death penalty in the country:

30-31 October 2018:  PGA organised, in partnership with ADPAN and Ensemble contre la peine de mort (ECPM), a regional parliamentary seminar entitled “Standing Against Death Penalty in Asia: The Role of Parliamentarians ” in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Hon. Tomasito Villarin , Member of the House of Representatives of the Philippines, attended the event and gave an intervention on the experience of the Philippines with the death penalty, including recent efforts to block its reintroduction.

29 November 2017:  PGA organized a side-event to its 39 th  Annual Forum in Milan (Italy), entitled  “Moving Away from Capital Punishment in Asia” . The event focused on the issues and arguments particularly relevant to the abolitionist movement in Asian countries. This gave the opportunity to PGA Member  Sen. Antonio Trillanes  to share his experience with fellow Asian parliamentarians and discuss how to best act against the reintroduction of the death penalty in abolitionist countries.

16 October 2017:  PGA issued a  statement  welcoming the move by nine of the twenty-four Filipino Senators, including PGA Members  Sen. Antonio Trillanes  and  Sen. Leila de Lima , to speak out against the government’s move to reintroduce the death penalty in the country, which led to the relevant Committee to defer its discussion of the bill. Sen. Trillanes also published a  statement .

Parliamentary Guidebook on the Abolition of the Death Penalty

Parliamentary Guidebook on the Abolition of the Death Penalty

English Français

Factsheet for Parliamentarians - Death Penalty and Poverty

Factsheet for Parliamentarians Death Penalty and Poverty

Parliamentary Factsheet on the Death Penalty and Terrorism-Related Offences

Parliamentary Factsheet on the Death Penalty and Terrorism-Related Offences

English Français العَرَبِيَّة‎

Parliamentary Factsheet on the Death Penalty and Mental Health

Parliamentary Factsheet on the Death Penalty and Mental Health

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[OPINION | New School] Is there a ‘right time’ for the death penalty?

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[OPINION | New School] Is there a ‘right time’ for the death penalty?

Illustration by Guia Abogado

The topic of the death penalty has been brought up many times in the past, and is now experiencing a revival in the current administration. President Rodrigo Duterte renewed his vows to bring it back in his term , and there are bills being filed and reviewed by lawmakers determined to restore the act. And the idea has been met, as is always the case with controversial subjects, with agreement and dissent. 

Many say it is high time to get the axe swinging again, that it’s time to instill fear again into those who trample upon the rights of others. The penalty would be a lesson for them to keep in line, a peacekeeping tool that should be used whenever possible. 

For others, especially from the religious sectors and myriad human rights groups, the death penalty should only exist in the confines of history, never to be used again, for it is an affront to the constitutional right to life and a grievous moral evil. 

However, there is one opinion that both agrees and disagrees at the same time and makes me shudder: to say that the country is not yet ready for the act. That the death penalty is not for this time, but can be implemented in the future. 

Clearly, it’s very unviable in current times. The daily killings, the rape of justice, the unfair standards between those who hold power and those who don’t – have become normal.

But it should be unviable in the future as well.

Picture a utopian Philippines, one that is advanced in all aspects – scientifically, economically, and socially, each person enjoys the best quality of life, like in the meme “ Pilipinas kung hindi itinapon ni Isagani ang lampara .” The justice system would be at its best; giving each their due. In this setting, some believe the death penalty can return again to mete out justice to those who have done true evil.

What if, God forbid, it was indeed implemented in this future? We would be seeing in our news feeds each day the names of those who are on death row, as well as those who have been executed. Their weeping faces, claiming that they were innocent, as well as of their families.

I see no difference between the penalty being implemented now or in the future. Children will experience psychological trauma when they hear that their parents are going to die, for an act that they may even still not understand. They may grow in hatred of the law, and even take up the burdens of their fathers or mothers, as well as the incessant stigma on families with convicts. These hardened children would commit more crimes, since they know that death will always be waiting for them anyway. Nothing will have changed. 

WebHits: Gravity ending take two

WebHits: Gravity ending take two

Aside from the convict, we must think about, for lack of a better term, the executioner. Can one comprehend the emotional and psychological effects of the penalty on this person? That the deed has been done, that he or she took a life? And what if that life was innocent? What if the convict was wrongly accused? 

Above all, the penalty severely desensitizes us to the idea of death. If some of us don’t bat an eye when someone gets murdered by criminals, then what more when there are regular state-sponsored killings? It is also quite unnerving to imagine that while a convict is being led to the execution room, there are cheers of “Serves you right,” “That’s what you get,” or “You should have thought of this before you did it!”

No person must die by another’s hand. No person must be happy for another’s death. 

We remember the Gomburza priests, wrongly accused of sedition; Eduardo Agbayani, who was willing to be forgiven by the daughter he raped, and was a phone call away from survival during former President Joseph Estrada’s term; Paco Larra​ñaga, who almost died for a crime he was several miles away from; and most recently, Mary Jane Veloso, nearly executed in Indonesia for accusations of drug trafficking, mercifully given the privilege to testify against her recruiters. 

People may call us guilty, asking, if we are innocent, then why do we dissent? But we fight for our fellowmen, who all deserve life. We dissent for their loved ones, who would be left in sorrow. We dissent for the sanctity of life itself, which is severely under attack in these difficult times.

Why do we see death as the answer, when it is literally the last resort? Why should we instill fear in people when we can look for other reasons to reduce motives for crime? Why should we kill when there are other methods that are far better and more humane? There are many questions that should be answered, which the simple execution of this harsh law cannot. – Rappler.com

Adrian L. Parungao, 19 years old, is currently a 2nd year Journalism student from the University of Santo Tomas.

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IMAGES

  1. Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines Argumentative Free Essay

    yes to death penalty in the philippines essay

  2. A Position Paper on the Death Penalty in the Philippines.docx

    yes to death penalty in the philippines essay

  3. Death Penalty Argumentative Essay

    yes to death penalty in the philippines essay

  4. Background Of The Study Of Death Penalty In The Philippines

    yes to death penalty in the philippines essay

  5. A Position Paper on the Death Penalty in the Philippines

    yes to death penalty in the philippines essay

  6. Background Of The Study Of Death Penalty In The Philippines

    yes to death penalty in the philippines essay

COMMENTS

  1. Yes to death penalty?

    February 4, 2019 5 minute read The death penalty in the Philippines was first abolished in 1987, making the Philippines the first country in Asia to terminate death penalty.

  2. Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines Argumentative Essay

    Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines Argumentative Essay. (2016, Oct 06). Retrieved from https://graduateway.com/yes-to-death-penalty-in-the-philippines/ Copy to clipboard Remember! This essay was written by a student You can get a custom paper by one of our expert writers Order custom paper Without paying upfront

  3. PDF Death Penalty and 'Most Serious Crimes'

    Republic Act No. 7659 or the Death Penalty Law. Over a decade later, RA 9346 or An Act Prohibiting the Imposition of Death Penalty in the Philippines was legislated. In effect, it repealed RA 8177 or the law designating death by lethal injection as well as RA 7659 and all other laws insofar as they impose the death penalty.

  4. Death Penalty in the Philippines: Evidence on Economics and Efficacy

    However, the literature suggests that there is still no clear and credible empirical evidence to back the argument that the death penalty is a crime deterrent. Furthermore, this paper examined the potential drivers of the growing death penalty support in the Philippines and the possible implications of reinstating the death penalty in the ...

  5. Philippines death penalty: A fight to stop the return of capital ...

    15 August 2020 By Preeti Jha BBC News Getty Images Mr Duterte has once again pushed to reintroduce the death penalty Capital punishment opponents expect a steep battle to prevent President...

  6. DEATH PENALTY

    The death penalty is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment. Amnesty opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception - regardless of who is accused, the nature or circumstances of the crime, guilt or innocence or method of execution.

  7. Philippines: The death penalty is an inhumane, unlawful and ineffective

    Philippines: The death penalty is an inhumane, unlawful and ineffective response to drugs. The adoption of a draft law by the Philippine House of Representatives to revive the death penalty sets the country on a dangerous path in flagrant violation of its international legal obligations, Amnesty International said today. ...

  8. Capital punishment in the Philippines

    Capital punishment in the Philippines (Filipino: Parusang Kamatayan sa Pilipinas) specifically, the death penalty, as a form of state-sponsored repression, was introduced and widely practiced by the Spanish government in the Philippines.A substantial number of Filipino national martyrs like Mariano Gómez, José Burgos, and Jacinto Zamora (also known as GomBurZa), Thirteen Martyrs of Cavite ...

  9. Death Penalty Danger in the Philippines

    In 2007, the Philippines ratified the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which requires countries to abolish the death penalty.

  10. Philippines and the Death Penalty

    Although the Philippines was the first Asian country to abolish the death penalty under the 1987 Constitution, it was re-imposed during the administration of President Fidel Ramos to address the rising crime rate in 1993, only to be abolished again in 2006, after the then President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo signed a law reducing maximum punishment to life imprisonment.

  11. Argumentative essay about death penalty in the philippine pdf

    committing violent acts. Since the dea ultimate punishment, it acts as a deterrent to potential offenders. Additionally, some argue that capital punishment allows for justice to be served on those who commit particularly heinous crimes. On the other hand, opponents of the death penalty have an equally persuasive set of arguments.

  12. [OPINION] In search for true justice: Death penalty is a ...

    Capital punishment, popularly known as " death penalty ," can be defined as a state-sanctioned act of executing a person sentenced to death after conviction by a court of law of a criminal...

  13. FAST FACTS: Death penalty in the world and in the Philippines

    Republic Act 9346 was then signed on June 24, 2006, abolishing the death penalty in the Philippines. Life imprisonment and reclusion perpetua took its place. Leo Echegaray was the last person to ...

  14. New School] Is there a 'right time' for the death penalty?

    No person must be happy for another's death.'. The topic of the death penalty has been brought up many times in the past, and is now experiencing a revival in the current administration. President ...

  15. OPINION: In the death penalty debate, who gets to say who can live and

    The Echegaray case. Echegaray's execution was the first in the Philippines since the death penalty's reinstatement in 1993 through the enactment of Republic Act No. 7659. People vs. Echegaray ...

  16. A Position Paper On The Death Penalty in The Philippines

    A Position Paper on the Death Penalty in the Philippines - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. --

  17. Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines

    268 Words 2 Pages Analyze This Draft Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines View Writing Issues File Tools Settings Filter Results Yes to Death Penalty in the Philippines Every second, a case is happening in any part of the country and even of the whole world. Justice is most of the time questioned by many people or should I say by everyone.

  18. PDF Argumentative Essay About Death Penalty in the Philippine

    This persuasive essay will examine both sides of the argument and attempt to come to a conclusion on the death penalty in the Philippines. To begin, let us look at why proponents argue for the death penalty as an effective deterrent.

  19. Essay About Death Penalty In The Philippines

    The death penalty on the other hand would have been effective if the overall public minded to consider it a system for ending criminal acts. While a monstrous number would ensure the nonattendance of the death penalty in their real system, the wrongdoing rate continues going higher for countries that still practice the death penalty.

  20. Argumentative Essay.docx English

    Argumentative Essay. Death Penalty in the Philippines. Death is not in anyone's hands. Capital punishment or death penalty was given to a criminal deemed unfit to live by the state as a punishment for his heinous crimes. Death penalty was in effect since the beginning of the Spanish era, the Martial Law period, and Fidel Ramos and Estrada's ...

  21. Argumentative Essay Philippines Should Restore THE Death Penalty

    kept notes philippines should restore the death penalty essay) we are aware that no one is perfect in this we all commit mistakes and sins. but lot of people

  22. Death Penalty In The Philippines Essay

    Death Penalty In The Philippines Essay 2088 Words9 Pages Death penalty is a capital punishment;it is used today and was also used during ancient times to penalize people with a variety of offenses.

  23. ANTI Death Penalty Argumentative Essay

    Death penalty was once legal in the Philippines, it was at the time of the previous President Ferdinand Marcos in 1926 using an electric chair or 'silya elektrika' in the past. ... ANTI-DEATH PENALTY ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY. Introduction Death penalty is a type of punishment where it practices putting a person to death for committing a crime ...