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Write your own newspaper article

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writing an article ks3 lesson

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  • Read All About It Lesson Plan For Ks3 English

Newspaper layout KS3 – Boost understanding of non-fiction writing

Priya Rudhun-Imrith

Lesson plan PDF with activity ideas

Encouraging students to analyse the presentation of newspaper articles can help them make leaps of understanding about non-fiction writing. I used this newspaper layout KS3 lesson with a mixed-ability Year 7 class studying the non fiction unit in preparation for the summer reading exam.

Teaching non-fiction can be tricky. Students easily slip into description rather than analysis. Developing a range of activities for this lesson allowed me to engage and stretch students of all abilities.

It involves a lot of independent thinking, combined with paired and group work. This makes learning dynamic and less teacher-led.

Students need to take ownership of the task. This leads to structured discussions, enabling the more able ones to formulate detailed analysis with technical accuracy. At the same time, lower ability students can engage with the task and work collaboratively. This boosts their confidence overall.

Newspaper layout KS3 lesson

Students find studying language in media interesting. The focus of this lesson is not to simply identify, but to infer and deduce from the text to show how the target audience is addressed.

Young people tend to be familiar with the technical terms but not always able to understand fully how they affect meaning, so they tend to describe generally, hence the aim of this lesson is to explore meaning.

The lesson aims to look closely at a newspaper article . Ask students to identify language and presentational features that support meaning in non-fiction text. Learning strategies include visual, auditory, paired, class discussion and individual written tasks.

This unit is cross-curricular – you’ll teach students technicalities of media language, which makes a direct link to media studies and advertising. Equally, this could be useful for design when focusing on page layout using software such as InDesign.

Priya Rudhun-Imrith is head of English at All Saints Secondary School, Dagenham . She has many years of teaching experience in English and Media Studies. Browse more free KS3 English reading and writing lesson plans and KS2 newspaper report resources .

Newspaper layout KS3 lesson plan

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Satellite photo showing a container ship entangled with the wreckage of a bridge.

Baltimore bridge collapse: a bridge engineer explains what happened, and what needs to change

writing an article ks3 lesson

Associate Professor, Civil Engineering, Monash University

Disclosure statement

Colin Caprani receives funding from the Department of Transport (Victoria) and the Level Crossing Removal Project. He is also Chair of the Confidential Reporting Scheme for Safer Structures - Australasia, Chair of the Australian Regional Group of the Institution of Structural Engineers, and Australian National Delegate for the International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering.

Monash University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation AU.

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When the container ship MV Dali, 300 metres long and massing around 100,000 tonnes, lost power and slammed into one of the support piers of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, the bridge collapsed in moments . Six people are presumed dead, several others injured, and the city and region are expecting a months-long logistical nightmare in the absence of a crucial transport link.

It was a shocking event, not only for the public but for bridge engineers like me. We work very hard to ensure bridges are safe, and overall the probability of being injured or worse in a bridge collapse remains even lower than the chance of being struck by lightning.

However, the images from Baltimore are a reminder that safety can’t be taken for granted. We need to remain vigilant.

So why did this bridge collapse? And, just as importantly, how might we make other bridges more safe against such collapse?

A 20th century bridge meets a 21st century ship

The Francis Scott Key Bridge was built through the mid 1970s and opened in 1977. The main structure over the navigation channel is a “continuous truss bridge” in three sections or spans.

The bridge rests on four supports, two of which sit each side of the navigable waterway. It is these two piers that are critical to protect against ship impacts.

And indeed, there were two layers of protection: a so-called “dolphin” structure made from concrete, and a fender. The dolphins are in the water about 100 metres upstream and downstream of the piers. They are intended to be sacrificed in the event of a wayward ship, absorbing its energy and being deformed in the process but keeping the ship from hitting the bridge itself.

Diagram of a bridge

The fender is the last layer of protection. It is a structure made of timber and reinforced concrete placed around the main piers. Again, it is intended to absorb the energy of any impact.

Fenders are not intended to absorb impacts from very large vessels . And so when the MV Dali, weighing more than 100,000 tonnes, made it past the protective dolphins, it was simply far too massive for the fender to withstand.

Read more: I've captained ships into tight ports like Baltimore, and this is how captains like me work with harbor pilots to avoid deadly collisions

Video recordings show a cloud of dust appearing just before the bridge collapsed, which may well have been the fender disintegrating as it was crushed by the ship.

Once the massive ship had made it past both the dolphin and the fender, the pier – one of the bridge’s four main supports – was simply incapable of resisting the impact. Given the size of the vessel and its likely speed of around 8 knots (15 kilometres per hour), the impact force would have been around 20,000 tonnes .

Bridges are getting safer

This was not the first time a ship hit the Francis Scott Bridge. There was another collision in 1980 , damaging a fender badly enough that it had to be replaced.

Around the world, 35 major bridge collapses resulting in fatalities were caused by collisions between 1960 and 2015, according to a 2018 report from the World Association for Waterborne Transport Infrastructure. Collisions between ships and bridges in the 1970s and early 1980s led to a significant improvement in the design rules for protecting bridges from impact.

A greenish book cover with the title Ship Collision With Bridges.

Further impacts in the 1970s and early 1980s instigated significant improvements in the design rules for impact.

The International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering’s Ship Collision with Bridges guide, published in 1993, and the American Association of State Highway and Transporation Officials’ Guide Specification and Commentary for Vessel Collision Design of Highway Bridges (1991) changed how bridges were designed.

In Australia, the Australian Standard for Bridge Design (published in 2017) requires designers to think about the biggest vessel likely to come along in the next 100 years, and what would happen if it were heading for any bridge pier at full speed. Designers need to consider the result of both head-on collisions and side-on, glancing blows. As a result, many newer bridges protect their piers with entire human-made islands.

Of course, these improvements came too late to influence the design of the Francis Scott Key Bridge itself.

Lessons from disaster

So what are the lessons apparent at this early stage?

First, it’s clear the protection measures in place for this bridge were not enough to handle this ship impact. Today’s cargo ships are much bigger than those of the 1970s, and it seems likely the Francis Scott Key Bridge was not designed with a collision like this in mind.

So one lesson is that we need to consider how the vessels near our bridges are changing. This means we cannot just accept the structure as it was built, but ensure the protection measures around our bridges are evolving alongside the ships around them.

Photo shows US Coast Guard boat sailing towards a container ship entangled in the wreckage of a large bridge.

Second, and more generally, we must remain vigilant in managing our bridges. I’ve written previously about the current level of safety of Australian bridges, but also about how we can do better.

This tragic event only emphasises the need to spend more on maintaining our ageing infrastructure. This is the only way to ensure it remains safe and functional for the demands we put on it today.

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Article Writing for KS3

Article Writing for KS3

Subject: English

Age range: 11-14

Resource type: Other

SD English

Last updated

13 June 2018

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writing an article ks3 lesson

A 217-slide PowerPoint that aims to teach article writing at KS3. Learners read a range of broadsheet and tabloid texts on the theme of crime and punishment and complete reading and writing activities based on each.

The article questions set are oriented towards AQA 8700 Paper 2, Question 5 but could be adapted for other boards.

Links to each article and report are provided.

The whole unit covers about 8-10 weeks and was written with a high ability year 8 group in mind.

This resource includes a ZIP file containing 44 files including the core PowerPoint. If there are download issues, please email me at SD English using the email address provided in my shop front.

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Microsoft customers complain Copilot doesn't work as well as ChatGPT. Microsoft says they're not using it right.

  • A top complaint from Microsoft's customers is that Copilot doesn't perform as well as OpenAI's ChatGPT.
  • Microsoft says customers aren't using its new artificial-intelligence tools properly.
  • The company is paying a partner to produce videos to teach customers how to write better prompts.

One of the top customer complaints about Microsoft 's Copilot is that it doesn't seem to work as well as ChatGPT , according to employees with direct knowledge of customer feedback.

"Every time a customer starts using it, they start comparing it to ChatGPT and saying, 'Aren't you guys using the same technology?'" one of the people said.

ChatGPT, OpenAI 's artificial-intelligence chatbot, has set relatively high expectations for customers who are now trying out Microsoft Copilot tools for the first time. The software giant's efforts to meet those expectations is an important test as the AI industry attempts to switch users from free consumer chatbot offerings to something more valuable.

Microsoft is racing to add value to these AI tools before customers start asking whether they're getting a proper return from the extra money they're spending on this much-hyped technology.

Copilot vs. ChatGPT

Copilot for Microsoft 365 has reached the most customers so far after the company made it generally available in November. This is a version of the AI assistant that works alongside the company's suite of business applications such as Word, Outlook, and Teams.

Feedback for the tool has been mixed to leaning positive so far, according to the Microsoft employees who spoke with BI.

There are the usual Microsoft problems: Some customers are using older versions of products such as the Outlook email service, and they expect whizbang AI Copilot capabilities to work with this somewhat aging software.

But Microsoft employees told BI the comparisons with ChatGPT kept coming up. These sources asked not to be identified discussing private matters.

The "work" version of the Copilot tool uses internal customer data to help provide automated support to employees working on tasks such as summarizing meetings.

It queries this sensitive information from sources including Microsoft's SharePoint collaboration software. This sometimes means responses aren't as quick or thorough as a free and open web-based chatbot such as ChatGPT that's been trained on information from the entire internet.

Microsoft employees told BI that customers who were saying this Copilot tool didn't compare favorably with ChatGPT just didn't understand how the different products work.

This was confirmed by Jared Spataro, Microsoft's corporate vice president of AI at work, in an interview arranged by the company.

Microsoft's Copilot tools are built on what the company calls the Azure OpenAI model. This takes OpenAI's top GPT models and adds additional capabilities.

Related stories

These GPT models provide a broad foundation of knowledge. Copilots essentially sit on top of this and tap private customer data to provide bespoke support in specific work situations. The system naturally has more restrictions, according to Microsoft employees. For instance, it only temporarily accesses internal data and then deletes it after each query.

Teaching customers how to prompt

Another problem for Microsoft is that users are typically bad at writing prompts, the employees say. These are special instructions that get the most out of AI models and chatbots. There's even a new job for this emerging skill, known as prompt engineering .

"It's a copilot, not an autopilot, you have to work with it," one Microsoft staffer told BI.

The answer an AI tool gives can only be as good as the question asked. "If you don't ask the right question, it will still do its best to give you the right answer, and it can assume things," this person added.

One of the employees said Microsoft had hired its partner BrainStorm to create training videos to help customers create better prompts for Copilot. Microsoft and BrainStorm declined to comment on this.

Some Microsoft customers have even created their own internal teams to help train staff on how to make the best use of these AI tools.

Spataro said Microsoft had put a lot of work into providing support for prompt engineering within the Copilot for Microsoft 365 product itself, such as with FAQs and prompt examples.

'Work' Copilot vs. 'web' Copilot

A source of customer confusion is that there's a "work" version of Copilot for Microsoft 365 and a "web" version of the tool.

The web-based version generates similar outputs to ChatGPT and runs in a similar way. Meanwhile, the "work" version is the one that uses internal private customer data to provide more bespoke and specific responses.

For instance, a Microsoft customer may use the web version of Copilot to search publicly available information about a client. Then they could switch to the work version to find out what extra information is available about this client from internal corporate data.

Still, employees told BI that customers were getting confused about why the "work" version wasn't giving responses as quickly or as thoroughly as the web-based Copilot.

Spataro said Microsoft had been taking measures to help customers understand how these different Copilot offerings operate. For instance, the company is introducing a toggle switch so customers can swap between the "web" and the "work" version of Copilot to help them understand which dataset — the web or their internal files stored within SharePoint — is being queried.

"Copilot for Microsoft 365 is unlike any other AI experience at work, with a deep understanding of your job and organization that combines top of the line AI models, the web, and your business data to enable new scenarios that directly impact the bottom line in a way that wasn't possible before generative AI," Spataro said in a statement.

Are you a Microsoft employee or someone else with insight to share?

Contact Ashley Stewart via email ( [email protected] ), or send a secure message from a non-work device via Signal (+1-425-344-8242).

Axel Springer, Business Insider's parent company, has a global deal to allow OpenAI to train its models on its media brands' reporting.

Watch: What is ChatGPT, and should we be afraid of AI chatbots?

writing an article ks3 lesson

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  2. English KS3 Article Writing

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  3. Newspaper Article Examples Ks3 : Ks3 English Lesson Plan Analyse The

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  4. Newspapers Part 4: Writing a Feature Article

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  6. English KS3 Article Writing

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  1. Article on Online Education in english writing|| Article in english

  2. Report writing

  3. || ARTICLE WRITING \ARTICLE WRITING FORMAT ||Paragraph writing for 12th,11th,10th and 9th ||

  4. Functional Skills: Language Techniques#englishlearning #adulteducation

  5. Sentence structures and sensory imagery

  6. Article Writing

COMMENTS

  1. Writing a Newspaper Article

    Subject: English. Age range: 11-14. Resource type: Lesson (complete) File previews. pptx, 3.19 MB. How to write a newspaper article. How to format the article. What to include in the article. Newspaper article task.

  2. How to write a newspaper report guide for KS3 English students

    inform the reader about the content and purpose of the article. Headlines are usually short and remove unnecessary words, for example, this headline: 'Baby found alive after earthquake' has ...

  3. Lesson: To write a newspaper report

    Lesson details Key learning points In this lesson, we will be revising all the features of a newspaper report, looking at the headline, 5Ws, witness statements, direct and indirect speech, journalistic sentence starters and lastly, tense in the final paragraph.

  4. Planning a newspaper article|KS3 English|Teachit

    Writing skills: Planning. Resource type. Worksheet. Templates. A useful planning sheet for writing a newspaper article. Suggested subjects are provided along with a template for students to write/type their article into. 55.75 KB. Free download. 34 KB.

  5. 174 Top "Writing An Article" Teaching Resources curated for you.

    Reading Blether Stations 2 reviews. Explore more than 174 "Writing An Article" resources for teachers, parents and pupils as well as related resources on "Article Writing". Instant access to inspirational lesson plans, schemes of work, assessment, interactive activities, resource packs, PowerPoints, teaching ideas at Twinkl!

  6. Writing A Newspaper Article KS3

    Headling writing is an important skill when it comes to selling newspapers and informing readers at a glance. Beyond's Writing A Newspaper Headline KS3 lesson details the art of writing a catchy headline, the techniques newspapers often employ and the differences between broadsheet and tabloid publications. In this lesson, students will: Identify the conventions of writing a newspaper article ...

  7. KS3

    Mrs Mitchell-Brady will talk you through your second writing task - writing a newspaper article, building on all of the writing skills that you have been wor...

  8. Newspaper Article Example

    Writing to inform is a key skill that's required for KS3 English students to succeed at GCSE English Language. "Writing to inform" covers a range of different media, from blog posts to leaflets and everything in between. Perhaps the most obvious, and our firm fave at Beyond, is the tabloid newspaper. If you like this resource, you might also like this Non-Fiction Texts Pack.

  9. Writing an article

    File previews. pptx, 22.03 MB. Year 10 and 11 - writing an article. (Edexcel and AQA) I have exhausted the typical article question such as write an article on why 'homework should be banned' and 'school uniform is good' etc etc… and my classes wanted something new and different. So, I picked something controversial such as whether ...

  10. How to Write a Newspaper Article (teacher made)

    This fantastic How To Write A Newspaper Article-resource is perfect for teaching your learners about newspaper articles and how to write a newspaper articles. It contains a definition of a newspaper article and an example format of a newspaper article. This resource is available in colour, black and white, eco-black and white, as well as eco ...

  11. Persuasive writing

    Focus of lessons. 1: Introduce students to the writing criteria and basic persuasive devices. 2: Increase awareness of speech structure and persuasive devices specific to speeches. 3: Practise writing in a GCSE speech format, targeting a specific audience. 4: Use counter-arguments and develop ideas into extended arguments through guided writing.

  12. Non-fiction and transactional writing

    Learn and revise the best techniques for writing a piece of non-fiction with this BBC Bitesize GCSE English (Edexcel) Language study guide.

  13. Writing skills

    Writing skills. Brush up on your writing skills with this selection of useful videos. KS3 English Writing skills learning resources for adults, children, parents and teachers.

  14. Writing A Newspaper Article KS3

    Headling writing is an important skill when it comes to selling newspapers and informing readers at a glance. Beyond's Writing A Newspaper Headline KS3 lesson details the art of writing a catchy headline, the techniques newspapers often employ and the differences between broadsheet and tabloid publications. In this lesson, students will: Identify the conventions of writing a newspaper article ...

  15. Newspaper layout KS3

    English. Encouraging students to analyse the presentation of newspaper articles can help them make leaps of understanding about non-fiction writing. I used this newspaper layout KS3 lesson with a mixed-ability Year 7 class studying the non fiction unit in preparation for the summer reading exam. Teaching non-fiction can be tricky.

  16. Lesson: Writing an opinion article

    Explore thousands of high-quality resources for lesson planning and curriculum design. All optional, adaptable and free.

  17. Grammar: What Is An Article? Worksheet

    Articles Worksheet for KS3 English. Ensure your KS3 English students are well-versed in articles with Beyond's Articles Worksheet for KS3 English. First describing the basis of definite and indefinite articles, our Articles Worksheet then asks students to complete a series of sentences with the correct article to cement their understanding.

  18. Baltimore bridge collapse: a bridge engineer explains what happened

    The Francis Scott Key Bridge was built through the mid 1970s and opened in 1977. The main structure over the navigation channel is a "continuous truss bridge" in three sections or spans. The ...

  19. Article Writing for KS3

    docx, 14.1 KB. A 217-slide PowerPoint that aims to teach article writing at KS3. Learners read a range of broadsheet and tabloid texts on the theme of crime and punishment and complete reading and writing activities based on each. The article questions set are oriented towards AQA 8700 Paper 2, Question 5 but could be adapted for other boards.

  20. Microsoft customers complain Copilot doesn't work as well as ChatGPT

    Microsoft says they're not using it right. A top complaint from Microsoft's customers is that Copilot doesn't perform as well as OpenAI's ChatGPT. Microsoft says customers aren't using its new ...

  21. Article Writing Lesson

    Develop your GCSE English students' writing skills with our detailed Article Writing Lesson, jam-packed with engaging content. This is a great way to engage your students with article writing and ensure they're meeting essential criteria prior to the exam. Article examples are also included to boost students' analysis of what makes a good ...