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How to Write a Great 250-Word Essay

David Dec 14, 2017

How to Write a Great 250-Word Essay

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In college, there are many instances where you may be required to write a 250-word essay – your application, exam questions, small writing prompts, etc. A 250-word limit may seem like a novel to some, but others find it difficult to get their point across with so few words. In this guide, we will look at a 250-word essay example, along with tips on how to write a great 250-word essay.   Bonus: Need to write a longer essay? See this guide on how to write a 500-word essay

The Basic Format of a 250-Word Essay

All essays consist of the same three parts: an introduction with a thesis, a body paragraph or body paragraphs that support the thesis, and a concluding paragraph that summarizes the overall essay.

In 250 words, you will most likely have 3-4 paragraphs in total, each with 50-100 words. This will allow for 3-5 concise but detailed sentences per paragraph.

A Step-by-Step 250-Word Essay Example

To help visualize this process, let’s go ahead and write a simple 250-word essay.  You’ll see our writing sample in green and our explanation of what we did (and what can be done) with each section in normal text.

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Without further ado, let’s get started on our essay!

TOPIC:  How has your family upbringing influenced your educational goals?

Step 1 – Write Your Thesis

Your thesis is the first thing you should consider in your essay. Simply put, it’s the main idea of your essay that will control everything else you write. If you could summarize the question in just one sentence, how would you do it?

For our topic   How has your family upbringing influenced your educational goals?  our thesis will be:

My parents saw little value in a formal education. It was their lack of passion that led me to my educational goals.

Step 2 – Write Your Introduction

In the introduction, the first sentence can be a broad or general statement that sets the tone for the piece. It is usually supported by a second sentence that leads into the thesis. The optional third sentence may pose a question that the thesis aims to answer, or it may prompt the reader to think about the topic in a different light. The final sentence of the intro paragraph clearly establishes the thesis.

As a general rule of thumb, the introduction should go from broad to specific, sentence by sentence, gradually leading up to your thesis. Here’s a sample example of an introductory paragraph.

Parents are supposed to push you past your goals, or at least, that’s what I always believed. I was raised in the generation of “you can do anything if you put your mind to it.” My parents did not follow that philosophy, and they saw little value in a formal education. It was their lack of passion that led me to my educational goals.

Word count:  Introductory paragraph, 64 words.

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Step 3 – Write The Body Paragraph(s)

Next, we’ll continue with the body paragraph. Remember, body paragraphs should support the thesis and be about 3-5 sentences or 50-100 words long. In a short essay you may opt for only one body paragraph but in a longer one you may need more.

So how should your body paragraphs support your thesis? Think of each body paragraph as an argument that supports it.

Working with our thesis   “My parents never saw the value of formal education and that’s what lead me to my educational goals” , then each paragraph could be about   how not seeing the value of formal education led to the writer pursuing it.

For example, maybe the writer didn’t want to end up in the same work as their parents. Or maybe it was the parents’ lack of belief in the writer that pushed them to pursue a better future.

Let’s have a look at what a body paragraph can look like for our 250 word essay.

From as far back as I can remember, I knew I didn’t want to follow in the footsteps of my parents, at least not when it came to work. My father had worked on the family farm all his life and my mother had been a housewife since graduation. They were both content with the simplicity of their lives and wanted the same for me. I remember my father telling me that college was “expensive and a waste of four years”.  I knew however, that I wanted a career in the city that would be more challenging than simple farm life could provide. The only way to make that possible would be through formal education and a college degree. 

Word count:  Body paragraph 119 words. Total essay is now 181 words.

Step 4 – Summarize with a Conclusion

The final paragraph is the conclusion. You may start this paragraph with “To summarize,” “As evident by X, Y, and Z,”  or a similar statement that highlights the biggest points in your essay. Use the conclusion paragraph to sum up the main point of your essay using different words. The last sentence can be something broad that leaves the reader wondering. Let’s see how we can write a conclusion for our sample essay.

While my parents may not understand the value of formal education, I know it is essential for my future. This has helped me immensely, by making me realize that without strong parental support, I’m the only one who’s responsible for my own goals. In a way this has been the strongest source of motivation. And for that, I am forever grateful.  

Notice how we summarize the main point of the essay in the first sentence. We then connect the first sentence to the a conclusion we arrive at. Finally we end in an optimistic tone by stating how this has been helpful and we are grateful. Unlike the introduction paragraph, which flows from broad sentences to specific, a conclusion generally flows the opposite way, from specific sentences to broader concepts.

Word count: Concluding paragraph 61 words. Total essay is now 242 words. 

Sure, we came up 8 words short. But being that close should not be considered an issue. If for some reason you are required to write 250 words minimum, you can make the essay longer by sprinkling in a few extra words.

The Entire 250-word Essay  Altogether

Parents are supposed to push you past your goals, or at least, that’s what I always believed. I was raised in the generation of “you can do anything if you put your mind to it.” My parents did not follow that philosophy, and they saw little value in a formal education. It was their lack of passion that led me to my educational goals. From as far back as I can remember, I knew I didn’t want to follow in the footsteps of my parents, at least not when it came to work. My father had worked on the family farm all his life and my mother had been a housewife since graduation. They were both content with the simplicity of their lives and wanted the same for me. I remember my father telling me that college was “expensive and a waste of four years”.  I knew however, that I wanted a career in the city that would be more challenging than simple farm life could provide. The only way to make that possible would be through formal education and a college degree.  While my parents may not understand the value of formal education, I know it is essential for my future. This has helped me immensely by making me realize that without strong parental support, I’m the only one who’s responsible for my own goals. In a way this has been the strongest source of motivation. And for that, I am forever grateful.  

Should I Write More Than 250 Words or Less Than 250 Words?

When a professor or college entry application asks for a “250 word essay,” 250 words is generally a rough guide. No one is going to fail you if you go over or under the limit by a few words. We’d say a good gauge is plus or minus 50 words. As a general rule of thumb though, try to stay as close to 250 words as possible without going too far over or under.

Essay Writing Tips

Here are some quick tips for writing a great 250-word essay:

  • Write the first draft from start to finish without any pauses. This will make the writing sound fluid, and you can make adjustments after that.
  • Avoid over-editing your work. Ideally, you should take a long pause between editing sessions so you can clear your head and come back with a fresh perspective.
  • Try not to think about the word count too much. Once you get in the habit of writing four 3-5 sentence paragraphs, you’ll find your words naturally get close to 250.
  • Don’t throw fluff sentences in your essay. Professors see right through those. Instead, think of an additional sentence to enhance the support in your body paragraphs.
  • If you feel like you have concisely and sufficiently answered the question below the word count, trust your gut. Most instructors will value quality over quantity.

The more 250-word essays you write, the easier they will become. Feel free to practice with free essay prompts online to train your brain to write with this rhythm. You’ll soon be able to whip out 250 words without checking your word count!

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College Essays

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Figuring out your college essay can be one of the most difficult parts of applying to college. Even once you've read the prompt and picked a topic, you might wonder: if you write too much or too little, will you blow your chance of admission? How long should a college essay be?

Whether you're a terse writer or a loquacious one, we can advise you on college essay length. In this guide, we'll cover what the standard college essay length is, how much word limits matter, and what to do if you aren't sure how long a specific essay should be.

How Long Is a College Essay? First, Check the Word Limit

You might be used to turning in your writing assignments on a page-limit basis (for example, a 10-page paper). While some colleges provide page limits for their college essays, most use a word limit instead. This makes sure there's a standard length for all the essays that a college receives, regardless of formatting or font.

In the simplest terms, your college essay should be pretty close to, but not exceeding, the word limit in length. Think within 50 words as the lower bound, with the word limit as the upper bound. So for a 500-word limit essay, try to get somewhere between 450-500 words. If they give you a range, stay within that range.

College essay prompts usually provide the word limit right in the prompt or in the instructions.

For example, the University of Illinois says :

"You'll answer two to three prompts as part of your application. The questions you'll answer will depend on whether you're applying to a major or to our undeclared program , and if you've selected a second choice . Each response should be approximately 150 words."

As exemplified by the University of Illinois, the shortest word limits for college essays are usually around 150 words (less than half a single-spaced page). Rarely will you see a word limit higher than around 650 words (over one single-spaced page). College essays are usually pretty short: between 150 and 650 words. Admissions officers have to read a lot of them, after all!

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Weigh your words carefully, because they are limited!

How Flexible Is the Word Limit?

But how flexible is the word limit? What if your poignant anecdote is just 10 words too long—or 100 too short?

Can I Go Over the Word Limit?

If you are attaching a document and you need one or two extra words, you can probably get away with exceeding the word limit by such a small amount. Some colleges will actually tell you that exceeding the word limit by 1-2 words is fine. However, I advise against exceeding the word limit unless it's explicitly allowed for a few reasons:

First, you might not be able to. If you have to copy-paste it into a text box, your essay might get cut off and you'll have to trim it down anyway.

If you exceed the word limit in a noticeable way, the admissions counselor may just stop reading your essay past that point. This is not good for you.

Following directions is actually a very important part of the college application process. You need to follow directions to get your letters of recommendation, upload your essays, send supplemental materials, get your test scores sent, and so on and so forth. So it's just a good general rule to follow whatever instructions you've been given by the institution. Better safe than sorry!

Can I Go Under the Word Limit?

If you can truly get your point across well beneath the word limit, it's probably fine. Brevity is not necessarily a bad thing in writing just so long as you are clear, cogent, and communicate what you want to.

However, most college essays have pretty tight word limits anyways. So if you're writing 300 words for an essay with a 500-word limit, ask yourself: is there anything more you could say to elaborate on or support your points? Consult with a parent, friend, or teacher on where you could elaborate with more detail or expand your points.

Also, if the college gives you a word range, you absolutely need to at least hit the bottom end of the range. So if you get a range from the institution, like 400-500 words, you need to write at least 400 words. If you write less, it will come across like you have nothing to say, which is not an impression you want to give.

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What If There Is No Word Limit?

Some colleges don't give you a word limit for one or more of your essay prompts. This can be a little stressful, but the prompts generally fall into a few categories:

Writing Sample

Some colleges don't provide a hard-and-fast word limit because they want a writing sample from one of your classes. In this case, a word limit would be very limiting to you in terms of which assignments you could select from.

For an example of this kind of prompt, check out essay Option B at Amherst :

"Submit a graded paper from your junior or senior year that best represents your writing skills and analytical abilities. We are particularly interested in your ability to construct a tightly reasoned, persuasive argument that calls upon literary, sociological or historical evidence. You should NOT submit a laboratory report, journal entry, creative writing sample or in-class essay."

While there is usually no word limit per se, colleges sometimes provide a general page guideline for writing samples. In the FAQ for Option B , Amherst clarifies, "There is no hard-and-fast rule for official page limit. Typically, we anticipate a paper of 4-5 pages will provide adequate length to demonstrate your analytical abilities. Somewhat longer papers can also be submitted, but in most cases should not exceed 8-10 pages."

So even though there's no word limit, they'd like somewhere in the 4-10 pages range. High school students are not usually writing papers that are longer than 10 pages anyways, so that isn't very limiting.

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Implicit Length Guideline

Sometimes, while there's no word (or even page) limit, there's still an implicit length guideline. What do I mean by this?

See, for example, this Western Washington University prompt :

“Describe one or more activities you have been involved in that have been particularly meaningful. What does your involvement say about the communities, identities or causes that are important to you?”

While there’s no page or word limit listed here, further down on page the ‘essay tips’ section explains that “ most essay responses are about 500 words, ” though “this is only a recommendation, not a firm limit.” This gives you an idea of what’s reasonable. A little longer or shorter than 500 words would be appropriate here. That’s what I mean by an “implicit” word limit—there is a reasonable length you could go to within the boundaries of the prompt.

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But what's the proper coffee-to-paragraph ratio?

Treasure Hunt

There is also the classic "treasure hunt" prompt. No, it's not a prompt about a treasure hunt. It's a prompt where there are no length guidelines given, but if you hunt around on the rest of the website you can find length guidelines.

For example, the University of Chicago provides seven "Extended Essay" prompts . You must write an essay in response to one prompt of your choosing, but nowhere on the page is there any guidance about word count or page limit.

However, many colleges provide additional details about their expectations for application materials, including essays, on FAQ pages, which is true of the University of Chicago. On the school’s admissions Frequently Asked Questions page , they provide the following length guidelines for the supplemental essays: 

“We suggest that you note any word limits for Coalition or Common Application essays; however, there are no strict word limits on the UChicago Supplement essays. For the extended essay (where you choose one of several prompts), we suggest that you aim for around 650 words. While we won't, as a rule, stop reading after 650 words, we're only human and cannot promise that an overly wordy essay will hold our attention indefinitely. For the “Why UChicago?” essay, we suggest about 250-500 words. The ideas in your writing matter more than the exact number of words you use!”

So there you go! You want to be (loosely) in the realm of 650 for the extended essay, and 250-500 words for the “Why UChicago?” essay.

Help! There Really Is No Guidance on Length

If you really can't find any length guidelines anywhere on the admissions website and you're at a loss, I advise calling the admissions office. They may not be able to give you an exact number (in fact, they probably won't), but they will probably at least be able to tell you how long most of the essays they see are. (And keep you from writing a panicked, 20-page dissertation about your relationship with your dog).

In general, 500 words or so is pretty safe for a college essay. It's a fairly standard word limit length, in fact. (And if you're wondering, that's about a page and a half double-spaced.) 500 words is long enough to develop a basic idea while still getting a point across quickly—important when admissions counselors have thousands of essays to read!

guy-with-magnifying-glass

"See? It says 500 words right there in tiny font!"

The Final Word: How Long Should a College Essay Be?

The best college essay length is usually pretty straightforward: you want to be right under or at the provided word limit. If you go substantially past the word limit, you risk having your essay cut off by an online application form or having the admissions officer just not finish it. And if you're too far under the word limit, you may not be elaborating enough.

What if there is no word limit? Then how long should a college essay be? In general, around 500 words is a pretty safe approximate word amount for a college essay—it's one of the most common word limits, after all!

Here's guidance for special cases and hunting down word limits:

If it's a writing sample of your graded academic work, the length either doesn't matter or there should be some loose page guidelines.

There also may be implicit length guidelines. For example, if a prompt says to write three paragraphs, you'll know that writing six sentences is definitely too short, and two single-spaced pages is definitely too long.

You might not be able to find length guidelines in the prompt, but you could still hunt them up elsewhere on the website. Try checking FAQs or googling your chosen school name with "admissions essay word limit."

If there really is no word limit, you can call the school to try to get some guidance.

With this advice, you can be sure you've got the right college essay length on lockdown!

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Hey, writing about yourself can even be fun!

What's Next?

Need to ask a teacher or friend for help with your essay? See our do's and dont's to getting college essay advice .

If you're lacking in essay inspiration, see our guide to brainstorming college essay ideas . And here's our guide to starting out your essay perfectly!

Looking for college essay examples? See 11 places to find college essay examples and 145 essay examples with analysis !

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Ellen has extensive education mentorship experience and is deeply committed to helping students succeed in all areas of life. She received a BA from Harvard in Folklore and Mythology and is currently pursuing graduate studies at Columbia University.

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What Is a 350-Word Essay?

It is a concise piece of writing that aims to convey a clear message or argument within a limited word count. It is a brief composition that requires students to effectively express their thoughts and ideas on a specific topic while maintaining a concise and focused approach. In such essay, students should strive to present a well-structured and coherent piece of writing. Also, it is crucial for students to prioritize the most important information and eliminate any unnecessary or repetitive content. They shouls use clear and concise language, and avoid excessive details or lengthy explanations.

How Long is a 350-Word Essay?

A 350-word essay is relatively short and typically spans approximately three-quarters of a page, depending on factors such as font size, spacing, and formatting.

Where Students Can Find a Sample of 350-Word Essay?

Students can find 350-word essay samples from various sources like educational websites, writing blogs, and online writing communities as they offer sample essays across different word counts and various topics. Students can search for specific topics or explore essay samples in their desired word count range. However, when using sample essays, it's important for students to remember that they should serve as a reference and source of inspiration. Plagiarism is strictly prohibited, so students should always ensure that their own work is original and properly cited when incorporating ideas or information from other sources.

How Many Supporting Points You Can Include in a 350-Word Essay?

It is advisable to include two to three well-developed supporting points in a 350-word essay. Each point should be supported by evidence and analysis to strengthen your overall argument.

Can You Adequately Develop Your Ideas in a 350-Word Essay?

Yes, a 350-word essay provides enough space to develop a focused argument or discuss a specific topic. However, it requires concise and efficient writing to ensure clarity and coherence.

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How Long Does It Take to Write 350 Words?

Writing 350 words will take about 8.8 minutes for the average writer typing on a keyboard and 17.5 minutes for handwriting. However, if the content needs to include in-depth research, links, citations, or graphics such as for a blog article or high school essay, the length can grow to 1.2 hours.

Documents that typically contain 350 words are high school and college essays , short blog posts, and news articles.

You may write faster or slower than this depending on your average writing speed. Adults typically type at about 40 words per minute when writing for enjoyment and 5 words per minute for in-depth essays or articles. They can handwrite at 20 words per minute. College students typically need to be able to write at 60-70 words per minute in order to quickly write essays.

Writing Time by Word Counts

The table below will tell you how long it will take to write typical word counts. If you want to know how long writing an essay or book will take, check out the table below:

Writing Time by Page Counts

The table below will tell you how long it will take to write typical page counts. If you want to know how long writing an essay or book will take, check out the table below:

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450 Word Essay Examples + Topic Ideas

You may think that 450-word essays are easy to write. After all, they are short and often take less than a page in length. But that’s precisely what makes them so tricky for an average student. Not everyone can cover complex topics in just a few paragraphs!

Popular types of 450-word papers are book reviews, lab reports, college essays, and abstracts. If you’ve been assigned one of these and need help writing it, you came to the right place. This article will teach you everything you need to know to complete a 400-450 words essay successfully. In addition, we’ve prepared plenty of outstanding topics and samples that will help you boost your inspiration. You can get even more ideas in IvyPanda’s free topic database , so make sure to check that out, too!

Now, let’s get right to it and see how to write an excellent 450-word essay without trouble.

  • 📜 Narrative Essay Examples
  • 👪 I Wish I Had Listened to My Parents: Topics
  • 🔬 Effect of Drug Abuse Essay Examples
  • 🔍 Freedom Is the Greatest Bondage Topics

✍️ How to Write a 450-Word Essay

  • 🏠 Personal Living Space Topics
  • 😳 Topics about an Embarrassing Situation
  • 📱 Positive and Negative Effects of Social Media Examples
  • 🤝 How I Help People in My Neighborhood: Topics
  • ⏰ “Better Late Than Never” Topics

📜 Narrative Essay: 450 Words Examples

  • Blog Response: Developing Different Kinds of Narratives I get the news set that makes her keep asking “is this journalism” and feel relaxed as she makes me realize am reading and not in the situation.
  • A Horrible Walk in the Wilderness Upon some reflection, Ashley concluded that she should have asked someone to meet her at the bus stop when she arrived at 10 o’clock and guide her to the picnic site.”One would have thought that […]
  • Counseling and Social Work Challenges Also, it may be important to try to work with different people and assess the impact that individual differences have on the work results.
  • Walking Tour: Irving Street in San Francisco The first place, which you can see is the Baskin Robbins store at the corner of the 24th avenue. The fine restaurant is located nearby the intersection of the Irving Street and the 23rd avenue.

👪 I Wish I Had Listened to My Parents: 450 Words Essay Topics

  • The moment I knew my parents were right about my future.
  • The best advice given to me by my parents.
  • How my mother’s advice helped me choose the best college .
  • How I got in trouble due to neglecting my parents’ advice.
  • How I learned about responsibility the hard way.
  • How parental guidance influenced my career choice .
  • When rebellion against parents leads to regret.
  • Following in your parents’ footsteps vs. finding your own way: which would you choose?
  • How I once got lost because I didn’t listen to my parents.
  • Is it true that parents always know better ?

🔬 Effect of Drug Abuse Essay: 450 Words Examples

  • Drug Abuse and Its Negative Effects This paper aims to highlight what the field of psychology says about the negative effects of drugs and why people continue using despite the consequences. The main effect is that it creates a memory of […]
  • Prevention Programs: Drug Abuse Resistance Education This program focuses on handling peer pressure among youths, a crucial cause of drug abuse in the country. The program is also grounded on sound research, which offers the critical elements vital to handling the […]
  • Community Intervention Practices Against Drug Abuse The key features that result in successful community-based intervention on drug abuse are integrated for effectiveness and efficiency. On the other hand, drug abuse refers to the consumption of substances that elicit particular feelings and […]
  • Alcoholism, Domestic Violence and Drug Abuse Kaur and Ajinkya researched to investigate the “psychological impact of adult alcoholism on spouses and children”. The work of Kaur and Ajinkya, reveals a link between chronic alcoholism and emotional problems on the spouse and […]
  • Drug Abuse: Drug Court and Detoxification However, since 1989, the US federal system has been providing the majority of drug abusers with proper treatment or education with the help of a drug court option.
  • Drug Abuse Diagnostics in Counseling If either the client or the professional wishes to determine the extent to which an individual is dependent on drugs, the only thing he or she would have to do is read the individual’s behavior.
  • Biopsychosocial Experience in Drug Abuse Treatment There has to be a preventive strategy in every intervention procedure to avoid the occurrence of a disease. I find the course of treatment in this intervention beneficial for the creation of the needed preventive […]
  • Social Behaviour as a Science: Drug Abuse in Youth Thus, the application of social psychology to the phenomenon of youth drug abuse helps to explain how social factors impact the prevalence of and risk for drug abuse.
  • Drug Abuse and Harmful Health Effects The principle recognizes the importance of helping drug addicts out of the activity but also sees the importance of protecting their rights to health matters if the country is to realize economic development.
  • Drug and Alcohol Abuse Among Young People It is evident among drinkers that, when the BACs are low they develop a feeling of elation and when it rises, a feeling of friendliness begins to develop.

🔍 Freedom Is the Greatest Bondage Essay: 450 Words Topics

  • The price we have to pay to become free.
  • Freedom of speech : a blessing or a curse?
  • With freedom comes responsibility.
  • Is true freedom possible?
  • Discuss relationships as an anchor of our freedom.
  • How can our views alter our perception of freedom?
  • Write about the sacrifices we make to become free.
  • The paradox of freedom.
  • Why freedom always has restrictions.
  • Corruption, loneliness, and other adverse consequences of freedom .

The biggest challenge in writing a 450-word essay is expressing your thoughts in a limited number of words. Want to know how to do it effectively? Then check out the essay-writing guide below!

450-Word Essay Structure

First, you’ll need to learn about essay structure. This knowledge will help you create a proper outline and give you an idea of what to include in each paragraph.

The picture shows 450-word essay structure.

A 450-word essay has the following structure:

  • The introduction consists of 1 paragraph with 100 words. It contains a hook, a thesis, and the topic’s background .
  • The main body usually comprises 2-3 paragraphs with 100 words each. In this main part, you cover your arguments.
  • The conclusion , just like the introduction, is usually 1 paragraph with 100 words. It covers your findings and final thoughts on the topic.

Keep these numbers in mind while outlining your paper. You may also use our outline generator to structure your essay quickly and conveniently.

450-Word Essay Introduction

The main priority when writing your introduction would be to make it as concise as possible. At the same time, remember to make it sufficiently informative. To achieve that goal, aim for the following:

  • The approximate size of your opening paragraph should be around 10% to 15% of the overall essay.
  • Ideally, your thesis should be very brief. One extended sentence will be just enough.
  • Your audience needs to be informed about your topic. Give some background info, but make it super-short and straight to the point.

If you need additional assistance writing a good introduction, we recommend you try our introduction generator . It can save a ton of your time and is 100% free!

450-Words Essay Conclusion

Your conclusion should recap all the key ideas from your essay and glue everything together into a coherent final thought. Ideally, your audience will have a feeling of finality after reading your paper.

Before proceeding to the conclusion, make sure to count the number of words that you’ve already used in the introduction and main body. If it exceeds 450, remove some segments or shorten your sentences.

To create a successful conclusion, you can use our free conclusion generator . It will save you time and ensure perfect results.

How Many References Should a 400-450 Word Essay Have?

The final thing that you’ll need to do is add some references to your essay. The usual requirement is 10 citations for every 1000 words. That means that for a 450-word paper, you’ll need to add 3-4 references. Our free citation generator will help you format them correctly.

🏠 Essay on Personal Living Space: 450 Words Topics

  • Convey your idea of a perfect home.
  • Compare living in the countryside with living in a city.
  • How can you protect your living space from the elements?
  • What color is the most suitable for your ideal personal space ?
  • How much space does each person need to live comfortably?
  • Write about your thoughts on ideal interior design .
  • Flat vs. cottage: which one is more comfortable?
  • How personal living space differs in various countries.
  • Describe the pros and cons of owning property .
  • Pros and cons of living with your parents.
  • Suggest how to use a small living space effectively.
  • How owning pets changes your personal living space.
  • Review the history of personal living spaces on college campuses.
  • What does your home mean to you?
  • Describe your vision of an ideal hotel.

😳 Essay on an Embarrassing Situation I Faced in 450 Words: Topics

  • Top 5 moments that I wish would have gone differently.
  • How I managed to go through my first public speech .
  • How my friend helped me avoid embarrassing myself.
  • Embarrassment vs. guilt : how these two things differ.
  • How fear of embarrassment prevented me from doing what I wanted.
  • How I managed to turn embarrassment into a triumph.
  • The feeling of embarrassment during my first date.
  • A humorous retelling of my most embarrassing moment.
  • How I usually cope with embarrassment.
  • How embarrassment teaches us self-acceptance .

📱 Positive and Negative Effects of Social Media Essay: 450 Words

  • Social Media and Its Effects: Mending One Rift While Creating Another The effects of social media on people’s ability and willingness to engage in online interactions have been viewed mainly as negative despite the presence of apparent benefits, such as the removal of barriers to communication. […]
  • The Effects of Social Media on Egypt Revolution It will examine the communication strategies employed by social media experts to magnify the evils of the ruling regime to warrant its expulsion from power. This author conducted research and provided information about the effects […]
  • Social Media Benefits for Non-Profit Organizations Being a relatively liberal platform, the use of social media like Facebook do not surcharge to gain exposure among the target audience and double as an advocacy tool to champion issues that are of interest […]
  • Social Media Use in Universities: Benefits This paper describes how the university might integrate at least two social media and networking technologies to accomplish its goals.
  • Social Media and Its Effects on Adolescents Orben, Tomova, and Blakemore have found that social deprivation might cause severe psychological complications to adolescents, particularly in the period of the pandemic.

🤝 450-Word Essay on How I Help People in My Neighborhood: Topics

  • The role of volunteering in my life.
  • Why is it important to help your family?
  • How I fight racial prejudice in my community.
  • How I help those who are in need.
  • Why should we selflessly help others?
  • How I use my skills to make our world a better place.
  • Why is it essential to promote volunteering ?
  • Charity as a form of help.
  • How I help people through my art.
  • Helping others vs. helping yourself: what is more important?
  • What motivates me to help others.
  • How my desire to help others shaped my career choice.
  • Volunteering as a form of hobby .
  • How my help changed my neighborhood.
  • Why do we need to help older people?

⏰ “Better Late Than Never” Story Essay: 450 Words Topics

  • What does it mean to be a late bloomer ?
  • How I’ve managed to overcome laziness after years of procrastination.
  • How my dream came true later than expected.
  • The time when procrastination lead to a good outcome.
  • What I do when I forget something important.
  • How waiting and hoping helped me achieve fulfillment .
  • Why is it better to do something late than never?
  • How I found my calling later in life.
  • Why is it better to confess a lie early on?
  • How I started doing sports after years of hesitating.
  • Why I want to be punctual .
  • Which decisions can be postponed, and which are better to be made immediately?
  • What can I start doing now to help save our planet?
  • How I started enjoying arts in midlife.
  • Changed one’s career path later in life.

📌 450 Word Essay: Answers to the Most Pressing Questions

📌 how many pages is 450 words essay.

How many pages is a 450-word essay? It depends on the line spacing. A paper of this length will take a page (single-spaced) or 2 pages (double-spaced). The exact length of your 450 words will depend on the citation style used, the footnotes, and the bibliography.

📌 How Many Paragraphs Is 450 Words?

How many paragraphs is a 450-word essay? Since a typical paragraph in academic writing contains 50-100 words, an essay of 450 words will consist of 5 to 7 paragraphs.

📌 450 Words Is How Many Sentences?

How many sentences is a 450-word essay? A typical sentence in academic writing consists of 15-20 words. So, 450 words are not less than 23-26 sentences.

📌 How to Write a 450-Word Paper Outline?

A 450-word essay outline usually follows a standard five-paragraph structure. Start your paper with a short introduction that includes an attention-grabber, some background information, and a thesis. Then add three body paragraphs that focus on your arguments. Finish your 450-word paper with a conclusion that contains a restated thesis and a summary of your ideas.

📌 How Fast Can You Write a 450 Word Essay?

How long does it take to write a 450-word essay? It will take you 9-18 minutes to type 450 words on your keyboard (the total time will depend on your typing speed). Writing an academic paper will take more time because you’ll have to research, make an outline, write, format, and edit your text. It would be best if you planned to spend not less than hour and a half for a 450-word paper.

📌 How to Reduce Word Count in a 450-Word Essay?

The easiest way to do that is to get rid of the less important arguments you consider in your 450-word essay. Rank your arguments and eliminate those weaker. Another idea is to edit your paper in order to make sentences shorter. For instance, you can remove some of the adverbs.

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  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2023, November 24). 450 Word Essay Examples + Topic Ideas. https://ivypanda.com/essays/words/450-words-essay-examples/

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How to Write a Killer 300 Word Essay, Examples and Outline

Published by gudwriter on January 4, 2021 January 4, 2021

How to write a 300-word essay? Start with understanding the topic, and after researching widely, write an outline. Use the outline to make the first draft and then edit it by trimming down the unnecessary words into a brief, clear, and straightforward 300-word article.

Elevate Your Writing with Our Free Writing Tools!

Did you know that we provide a free essay and speech generator, plagiarism checker, summarizer, paraphraser, and other writing tools for free?

Most students may find it easy to write answers in two to three pages, but; a 300-word essay requires much more than just information! Regardless of the topic selected for your essay, our top speech writing service is ready to give you the best results.

Tutors often assign their students with short essays to gauge their knowledge, literary skills, and opinions. The student is supposed to give their views or explain a phenomenon using concise language. It takes one or two pages to write up a 300 words essay.

However, just because it is short doesn’t mean it should be vague. Instead, it requires you to plan, research deeply about the topic and then write with precision. These are the skills that will earn you a top grade in your assignments.

Tips for Writing a Killer 300 Word Essay

  • Research on the topic

Before anything, you need to make yourself conversant with what the essay is about. Have a full understanding of the essay question. This will help you know the right answer that the examiner needs. Research about what you are writing and have your facts straight. 

Remember, if you are going to convince the audience, then you will need to provide them with the necessary information in your essay.

  • Take time to plan your essay

If you are going to write my essay right, then you need to be well organized. This means that you must pay attention to the format. In most cases, the examiner will only give you instructions such as ‘explain this and that in 300 words’. It is up to you to know what to include in your introduction, body, or conclusion. It’s critical to draft up an outline before you write the main essay. Pick the significant points and illustrations that you will use when writing your essay. This makes your work neat and evades the trap of being fluffy or redundant.

  • Edit your essay

After you have written your work, it is crucial to read the essay at least two times before submitting it. The first read is a chance to do away with typos and other grammatical errors. The second read gives you new ideas on things you should have possibly omitted or included in the essay.

300 Word Essay Outline

The outline gives you the format to write a killer short essay. It acts as the skeleton onto which your content attaches. When you have the layout, you can write the essay in less than thirty minutes. Most essays have four main segments; title, introduction, body, and conclusion.

The title signals the main message you expect in the article. The first paragraph is usually the introduction, and it  captures the reader’s attention  to read. The body is divided into different sections that handle each of the points that are supporting your argument. Then, the conclusion paragraph sums up and signs off the essay.

Some teachers may give you the topic. However, if they don’t, be sure to pick the best. You can do this by finding a topic that favors you the most. Talk about a field that you are familiar with to have enough material to write about. You may also need to research widely about the topic with which you have been presented. Make your title short and let it summarize the text at hand.

  • Introduction 

The introduction paragraph needs to be brief and aim at acquainting the reader with the topic and grab their attention. An introduction paragraph will be simple to write if you are already conversant with the matter. After hooking the reader to the essay, state your thesis and, in a captivating way, lead your audience to the body paragraphs. Keep your introduction paragraph about 50 words.

Start your introduction paragraph with a conclusive hook. This statement is broad enough to capture the readers’ minds and a meta-theme of your essay. Remember, it is not the thesis but a general perception. e.g.:

“When a man tries to fight against powers beyond him, no matter how hard he strives, he will submit to their will.”

The thesis statement is a sentence that carries the argument of the essay. It is not the title, but it takes the meaning of the topic and the body. If you’ve been provided with a topic to write about, you should look to pick the direction. The direction of your subject is the thesis. e.g.:

“This is clearly shown in Sophocles classical Theban play ‘Oedipus Rex’- where the prince fights against a prophecy to kill his dad and wed his mum, but his efforts only lead him to fulfill it.”

Your other sentence(s) on the introduction section should lay the ground for the oncoming points.

The body of a three hundred word essay should have 2-3 paragraphs. None of these should exceed 100 words. It’s advisable to keep it 75 words (4-6 sentences). If you use two paragraphs in this section, the word count should be 100 for each. 70-75 words should be used when you have three points to discuss. Each of the paragraphs should have its point of discussion hooked to the thesis.

Body Paragraph 1

  • Strongest supportive point
  • Illustrations
  • Explanation
  • A conclusion statement tied to the thesis
  • A transition to the next paragraph

Body Paragraph 2

  • Strongpoint
  • Illustration
  • Conclusion sentence tied to the thesis
  • Transition to the next paragraph

Body Paragraph 3

  • Weakest point
  • Conclusion paragraph

This section requires you to give a factual summary of your essay in about 50 words. The ideal conclusion sentence should have 3-4 sentences. The first should restate the thesis, and the other two summarize the article. Then, it would help if you signaled that you are signing off using an ending statement.

  • Restate the thesis
  • Summarize the essay
  • Ending statement

Explore: Demonstration speech topics .

300 Word Essay Samples

Sample 1: oedipus rex, proof that fate rules.

When a man tries to fight against powers beyond him, he will submit to their will no matter how hard he strives. This is clearly shown in Sophocles’ classical Theban play “Oedipus Rex,” where the prince fights against a prophecy to kill his dad and wed his mum, but his efforts to oppose only lead him to fulfill it. 

Humans live in a pre-structured world, and the only thing they can do is to toe the already set lines. While it is easy for everyone to change the set principles that run the world, they end up losing the fight. Oedipus runs away from home to escape the curse of marrying his mother and killing his father. Unfortunately, it turns out that his family in Olympus is related to him by adoption. So, while he tries to change and lead a healthy life, he ends up killing his birth father at the crossroads and then marries his birth mother. His human efforts only speed up the fulfillment of the prophecy. 

Secondly, society acts as a vehicle through which fate gets fulfilled. The messenger from the King of Thebes sends him to kill Oedipus, but instead, he leaves him to die in the field. A shepherd sees the boy and takes him to the barren royal family in his home country. Then, when he’s grown up, the people around Oedipus tell him about the prophecy, which makes him feel urged to run away. In the process, he fulfills what fate has in store for him.

This clearly explains how difficult it is for humans to set a separate life path from what fate has already established. Humans are bound by fate, and it controls the things they do no matter how hard they try. Oedipus Rex is a victim of the predetermined life, and there’s little he can do about it. His efforts to evade the abomination only lead him into tripping into it. In short, the play is a classical indication of the extent to which deities can take control of human life.

Sample 2: Technical Skills are More Important than Theoretical Subjects

Students’ culture in high school and colleges flocking to take theoretical subjects at the expense of acquiring technical skills needs to be controlled. Society needs more technical skills than conceptual skills to develop. Thus, the sooner we encourage people to take skill courses, the better for our future. 

Technical subjects such as the sciences teach people to perform real work and achieve concrete results. Technical skills are needed for development and facing the challenges brought by modernization and civilization. The world today needs people who can come up with practical solutions to pressing matters. On the other hand, the results of theoretical subject-related solutions are usually abstract. This ends up having too many ideas but little efforts to use them in transforming society. Thus, if most students would take technical skills, it would make the world a better place. 

Then, the massive influx of people with non-applicable theoretical skills flooding the job market is unnecessarily increasing unemployment and poverty rates. Every government worldwide is trying to fight unemployment and poverty while they can efficiently address these problems by giving their citizens the proper education. Technical skills equip students with hands-on abilities to make things, and it is not easy for them to be jobless. People with such skills don’t need to be formally employed as they can use their aptitude to sort their lives. This makes such skills more critical than those that are theoretical. 

Modern society is moving fast, and the need for technical skills keeps outdoing that of theoretical capabilities. Technical skills help reduce the rate of unemployment and poverty. At the same time, they increase the workforce needed to transform and develop society by offering hands-on solutions to daily challenges. Therefore, it is doubtless that it is high time the enrollment to technical courses is increased as compared to theoretical subjects.

Sample 3: Democracy is an Expensive Necessity

Democracy is one of the best-known methods of governance. However, it does not come without its flaws. Several jurisdictions worldwide have adopted the essence of having the people determine the way they want to be ruled. However, since the principle of self-determination is highly revered, it is the most expensive way to order people. 

Democracy requires frequent elections to determine new leaders and give people the chance to decide on the direction they want their societies to take. However, this only ends up ruining the economy. In most countries, the electioneering year records closures of businesses due to political uncertainties. Currencies and shares lose their value in the process until the leaders are sworn in. This makes democracy an expensive deal. 

In the same breadth, the idea of having elections only brings about unnecessary competition among the political class, which has nothing to do with the development of society. In particular, politicians fix problems for fame and secure another term in office instead of doing it to transform people’s lives. This fuels populism as politicians strive to outdo each other in the eyes of the public. In the end, the services that people are offered are not geared towards making the world a better place. This makes this mode of governance costly as it hurts essential parts of the economy. 

In short, democracy is indeed an expensive necessity. Elections cause unnecessary political instability, which hurts the economy. The ruling class typically work for showoff instead of having the interest of the people at heart. However, despite the economic glitches attached to self-rule, it protects freedoms. People can vote for individuals they find worthy of ruling them. Public participation policy also ensures that the people take part in the decision making process. This part tries to cut the balance in shaping this form of governance as an expensive necessity. 

Useful resource ;

Essay sample on causes and effects of stress on students .

Things you Must do Before Submitting your Essay

Students come up with the ideal essay titles, outline, and content. Then they are surprised when they get scores that are below their expectations. Well, no matter how impressive your essay may be, there is still more that you need to do to get a good grade. The finishing of the essay is just as important as the beginning. That is why you need to do the following before submitting it to your professor.

  • Check for plagiarism

Signs of plagiarism in your work screams inauthentic, and your professor will not be pleased if you submit plagiarized material. To be on the safe side, run your work through a plagiarism checker to ensure the content is original before submitting it.

  • Check for referencing

As you are aware, you are supposed to quote the source of any idea that is not your own. You may forget to put down references while writing, and this is your chance to ensure that nothing significant has been left out.

This kind of essay is short, but that does not mean that you don’t have to play by the book. An essay structure should be maintained, alongside adherence to other rules that apply to essay writing. The guide above will go a long way in ensuring that you write a winning essay.

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How to Write a 300-Word Essay: Length, Examples, Free Samples

How to Write a 300-Word Essay: Length, Examples, Free Samples

You might think writing a 300-word essay is easy because it is short. Well, it’s not all about the size. In a 300-word essay, you must express your thoughts and arguments concisely and within a very tight word limit.

The real challenge starts when you decide which sentence to leave out because every word matters and there’s no place for filler words. It is also tricky to fit the intro, arguments, and conclusion into a 300 word essay format. But are all these elements obligatory in such a kind of writing?

Let’s find out how to write a 300-word essay , its key elements, and where to find some excellent 300-words essay examples.

  • 🖊️ How to Write a 300-Word Essay

📎 300-Words Essay Sample

  • 🎊 More Essay Examples
  • 🪄 Tips for a 300 Words Essay
  • 🔎 300 Word Essay Topics

❓ 300-Words Essay FAQ

🔗 references, 📝 what does a 300-word essay look like.

The picture shows a basic structure of a 300-word essay.

Below, we will explain everything about 300-word essays. How many pages is a 300-word essay? What does it look like? Find a complete format breakdown here!

300 Word Essay Format

300 word essay types.

You can see a basic outline and its necessary elements above. However, these parts can change depending on the type of the essay. Each essay genre might imply a different structure and paragraph length.

Here are the most popular types of 300-word essays:

  • A narrative essay tells a story and is typically written in the first person.
  • A descriptive essay describes a person, place, or object in detail and uses sensory language.
  • An expository essay presents information and facts about a topic and provides an explanation or analysis.
  • A persuasive essay presents an argument or viewpoint on a particular topic and persuades the reader to agree with the author’s opinion.
  • A compare and contrast essay compares two or more subjects and highlights their similarities and differences.

300 Word Essay Length

The 300-word essay length depends on the font and page parameters. With Times New Roman, it is typically 0.6 pages if single-spaced or 1.2 pages if double-spaced. It is usually not more than 20 sentences long if your sentences are 15-20 words long.

How many paragraphs should a 300-word essay have? The number of paragraphs depends on the structure. A 300-word paper can be divided into five sections (1 – intro, 3 – body, 1 – conclusion), 2-5 sentences each if it follows the classical format.

🖊️ How to Write a 300 Word Essay – Simple Guide

Use this step-by-step explanation to write a winning 300-word essay:

The picture provides steps for writing a 300-word essay.

Step 1: Start with a Strong and Clear Thesis Statement

Your thesis should describe the essay’s main idea and guide both you and your readers throughout the essay. Spend some time researching the topic before you formulate the thesis statement. It will help create a more specific and focused thesis.

Step 2: Create an Outline

Outline preparation includes deciding on the paragraphs’ contents, order, and length . Think about the main idea that will be conveyed in each section. This will help organize the paper and ensure it flows logically and coherently . However, remember that each body paragraph should present a new thought with evidence that proves your point.

Step 3: Write the Essay

It is important to write clearly, using formal language that is easy to understand . In the beginning, highlight your essay’s core idea and prepare readers for what they will learn further. For each body paragraph, develop one topic idea and provide evidence and examples. In summary, briefly retell what you discussed in your paper: restate your thesis statement and touch on the significant points of the body.

Step 4: Reread and Edit the Essay

Take a break for a day or two before rereading the essay. It can help you gain a fresh perspective and catch errors you may have missed earlier . Check it for spelling and grammar errors . Don’t forget to ensure that the essay meets the word limit.

Here, you will find some examples of 300-word essays for college students.

300-Word Essay on Career Goals Examples

This is a 300-word essay on why I want to be a nurse topic:

Career goals provide a roadmap to success and help keep individuals motivated and focused. In this essay, I will discuss my career goals: becoming a healthcare professional, working in a hospital setting, and eventually obtaining a leadership role. My first career goal is to become a healthcare professional. My desire to help people and make a positive impact influenced this goal. I am pursuing a nursing degree, which will equip me with the necessary knowledge and skills to provide quality care. I plan to specialize in pediatrics or oncology, where I can make a difference in the lives of patients and their families. My second career goal is to work in a hospital setting. Hospitals are dynamic and challenging environments that require individuals to work well under pressure and think critically. Working in a hospital will allow me to gain experience in various areas of healthcare, such as emergency medicine and surgery. I also hope to work with a diverse patient population, which will broaden my perspective and deepen my understanding of healthcare. My third career goal is to obtain a leadership role. As a leader, I will be able to make a greater impact on patient care and healthcare delivery. I plan to get a master’s degree in healthcare administration or nursing leadership to prepare me for this role. I believe that effective leadership is essential for achieving positive outcomes in healthcare and ensuring that patients receive the highest quality of care. In conclusion, my career goals are to obtain a medical degree, a job in a hospital, and a leadership role. I am committed to achieving these goals by pursuing my college education, gaining experience in healthcare, and receiving advanced education in healthcare administration or nursing leadership. I am excited about these opportunities and look forward to positively impacting the lives of patients and the healthcare industry.

The picture provides the example of a 300-word essay on career goals.

🎊 More 200-300 Word Essay Examples

Check out our free 300-word essay samples on popular topics:

  • Romeo and Juliet essay 300 words. The paper analyzes the 1996 film adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, directed by Baz Luhrmann. The author discusses the theme of forbidden love and the various ways in which Luhrmann adapts the play.
  • The person I admire most essay 300 words. The paper discusses Michael Jackson as a pop star role model. It explores his background, approach to discrimination, and life and career details.
  • Who am I essay 300 words. This 300-word sample discusses the role of culture in shaping an individual’s self-concept and development. The author argues that culture plays a significant role in an individual’s perception of themselves and the world around them, shaping their behavior and interactions with others.
  • My pet dog essay 300 words. The paper argues that dogs make the best pets. The author explores dog qualities, including loyalty, companionship, and their ability to improve mental and physical health.
  • Global warming essay in English 300 words. The paper is a discussion of the economic instruments to regulate global warming. While economic tools can effectively regulate CO 2 emissions, there are concerns about the irrationality of tax rates and people’s willingness to pay more for familiar technology.
  • Friendship essay 300 words. The paper examines the aspects of intimacy in female friendships. It explores the different levels of intimacy, including emotional, physical, and intellectual intimacy. The author discusses the importance of intimacy in maintaining long-lasting and meaningful friendships between women.
  • 300 word essay about Thanksgiving. The paper discusses the history of the first Thanksgiving in the United States and compares it to modern Thanksgiving. The author explores the origins of Thanksgiving, its cultural significance, and how it has evolved.
  • Freedom of speech essay 300 words. The paper discusses the concept of freedom of speech and its relationship with censorship. The author explores the historical and philosophical underpinnings of freedom of speech and various forms of censorship.

🪄 BONUS Tips for a 300 Words Essay

🔎 300 word essay topics & examples.

If you feel ready to start writing a 200-300 word essay, get inspired by the topics we’ve collected below. Use these academic essay examples to make your 300-word essay flawless!

  • The impact of social media on society.
  • The benefits and drawbacks of remote learning.
  • The effects of regular fast food consumption on health.
  • The importance of exercise for mental health.
  • The impact of technology on communication.
  • The role of art during significant historical events.
  • The benefits and challenges of multiculturalism.
  • The impact of climate change on our daily lives.
  • The effects of stress on physical health.
  • The role of education in personal and societal development.
  • Religion in Chinese Society: Confucianism.
  • World War II: Impact on American Society.
  • Problems in the US Healthcare System.
  • Legalization of Marijuana: Pain Management.
  • The Future of Bio-Fuel in the Civil Aviation Industry.
  • Emotional Contagion Research in Psychology.
  • Curriculum Adaptation to the Needs of Students.
  • Aspects of the Global Surgical Package.
  • Subjective and Objective Description of Experience.
  • The Covid-19 Related Social Problems.
  • Communication Improved by “New Media in the News.”
  • Lego Company’s Core Values and Ethical Dilemmas.
  • The Major Causes of the Great Depression.
  • Strategies to Control Disease Incidence.
  • United AirlinesEnvironmental Sustainability Initiatives.
  • Activism and Extremism on the Internet.
  • Misinformation Online in Healthcare: Preventive Measures.
  • Freedom of Speech and Censorship.
  • Why Say “No” to Capital Punishment?
  • What Is Love?: Answer From the Different Points of View.
  • Budget Airlines and Their Growth Factors in Europe.
  • The Problem of Shooting in Schools.
  • Individual and Systemic Racism.
  • Three Dimensions of Sexuality.
  • The Issue of Homelessness.
  • Personal Responsibility and World Population.
  • Targeted Advertising in Business.
  • Femininity and Masculinity in Media and Culture.
  • Tesco Market Strategy: Outside-In and Inside-Out.
  • “ A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner.
  • The Corporate Social Responsibility in Sport.
  • Is Nuclear Power Renewable Energy?
  • Sex Education Among Young People.
  • The Unfair Control of Power.
  • Impact of Artificial Intelligence.

If you didn’t find anything suitable, try our free essay title generator , it will help you come up with a perfect 300-word essay topic!

How to write a 300 word essay?

To write a 300-word essay, start with drafting a thesis statement. Then create an essay plan with three main points to support your thesis. Begin each paragraph with a clear topic sentence and provide supporting evidence. Wrap up your essay with a concluding section that reinforces your thesis.

How long does it take to write a 300 word essay?

With adequate preparation and focus, it’s possible to complete a 300-word paper in 30 minutes to an hour. However, the actual time you need to write a 300-word essay varies depending on your experience and topic complexity.

What does a 300 word essay look like?

A 300-word essay typically begins with an introduction with a thesis statement. There are also three body paragraphs with supporting evidence. A concluding paragraph that reinforces the thesis is the final section. Each paragraph should contain no more than 70 words.

How many pages is a 300 word essay?

Let’s assume the font is size 12 with standard margins. Then a 300-word essay is generally one page if single-spaced or two pages if double-spaced. However, the formatting and spacing requirements may vary based on the assignment or instructor’s guidelines.

How long is a 300 word essay?

A 300-word essay is approximately one-third of a single-spaced page or two-thirds of a page if double-spaced. It’s essential to follow the formatting and spacing requirements outlined by the instructor or assignment guidelines.

  • Tips for writing short essays – Concordia University
  • How Many Pages Is 300 Words? – Capitalize My Title
  • Simple Ways to Write a Short Essay (with Pictures) – wikiHow
  • Essay Structure | Harvard Writing Center
  • 12 Useful Tips To Improve Your Essay Writing Skills | Indeed.com
  • Develop a Topic & Working Thesis – How to Write a Good Essay – LibGuides at Bow Valley College
  • How to Write a Statement of Professional Goals | College of Education
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Words to Use in an Essay: 300 Essay Words

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Hannah Yang

words to use in an essay

Table of Contents

Words to use in the essay introduction, words to use in the body of the essay, words to use in your essay conclusion, how to improve your essay writing vocabulary.

It’s not easy to write an academic essay .

Many students struggle to word their arguments in a logical and concise way.

To make matters worse, academic essays need to adhere to a certain level of formality, so we can’t always use the same word choices in essay writing that we would use in daily life.

If you’re struggling to choose the right words for your essay, don’t worry—you’ve come to the right place!

In this article, we’ve compiled a list of over 300 words and phrases to use in the introduction, body, and conclusion of your essay.

The introduction is one of the hardest parts of an essay to write.

You have only one chance to make a first impression, and you want to hook your reader. If the introduction isn’t effective, the reader might not even bother to read the rest of the essay.

That’s why it’s important to be thoughtful and deliberate with the words you choose at the beginning of your essay.

Many students use a quote in the introductory paragraph to establish credibility and set the tone for the rest of the essay.

When you’re referencing another author or speaker, try using some of these phrases:

To use the words of X

According to X

As X states

Example: To use the words of Hillary Clinton, “You cannot have maternal health without reproductive health.”

Near the end of the introduction, you should state the thesis to explain the central point of your paper.

If you’re not sure how to introduce your thesis, try using some of these phrases:

In this essay, I will…

The purpose of this essay…

This essay discusses…

In this paper, I put forward the claim that…

There are three main arguments for…

Phrases to introduce a thesis

Example: In this essay, I will explain why dress codes in public schools are detrimental to students.

After you’ve stated your thesis, it’s time to start presenting the arguments you’ll use to back up that central idea.

When you’re introducing the first of a series of arguments, you can use the following words:

First and foremost

First of all

To begin with

Example: First , consider the effects that this new social security policy would have on low-income taxpayers.

All these words and phrases will help you create a more successful introduction and convince your audience to read on.

The body of your essay is where you’ll explain your core arguments and present your evidence.

It’s important to choose words and phrases for the body of your essay that will help the reader understand your position and convince them you’ve done your research.

Let’s look at some different types of words and phrases that you can use in the body of your essay, as well as some examples of what these words look like in a sentence.

Transition Words and Phrases

Transitioning from one argument to another is crucial for a good essay.

It’s important to guide your reader from one idea to the next so they don’t get lost or feel like you’re jumping around at random.

Transition phrases and linking words show your reader you’re about to move from one argument to the next, smoothing out their reading experience. They also make your writing look more professional.

The simplest transition involves moving from one idea to a separate one that supports the same overall argument. Try using these phrases when you want to introduce a second correlating idea:

Additionally

In addition

Furthermore

Another key thing to remember

In the same way

Correspondingly

Example: Additionally , public parks increase property value because home buyers prefer houses that are located close to green, open spaces.

Another type of transition involves restating. It’s often useful to restate complex ideas in simpler terms to help the reader digest them. When you’re restating an idea, you can use the following words:

In other words

To put it another way

That is to say

To put it more simply

Example: “The research showed that 53% of students surveyed expressed a mild or strong preference for more on-campus housing. In other words , over half the students wanted more dormitory options.”

Often, you’ll need to provide examples to illustrate your point more clearly for the reader. When you’re about to give an example of something you just said, you can use the following words:

For instance

To give an illustration of

To exemplify

To demonstrate

As evidence

Example: Humans have long tried to exert control over our natural environment. For instance , engineers reversed the Chicago River in 1900, causing it to permanently flow backward.

Sometimes, you’ll need to explain the impact or consequence of something you’ve just said.

When you’re drawing a conclusion from evidence you’ve presented, try using the following words:

As a result

Accordingly

As you can see

This suggests that

It follows that

It can be seen that

For this reason

For all of those reasons

Consequently

Example: “There wasn’t enough government funding to support the rest of the physics experiment. Thus , the team was forced to shut down their experiment in 1996.”

Phrases to draw conclusions

When introducing an idea that bolsters one you’ve already stated, or adds another important aspect to that same argument, you can use the following words:

What’s more

Not only…but also

Not to mention

To say nothing of

Another key point

Example: The volcanic eruption disrupted hundreds of thousands of people. Moreover , it impacted the local flora and fauna as well, causing nearly a hundred species to go extinct.

Often, you'll want to present two sides of the same argument. When you need to compare and contrast ideas, you can use the following words:

On the one hand / on the other hand

Alternatively

In contrast to

On the contrary

By contrast

In comparison

Example: On the one hand , the Black Death was undoubtedly a tragedy because it killed millions of Europeans. On the other hand , it created better living conditions for the peasants who survived.

Finally, when you’re introducing a new angle that contradicts your previous idea, you can use the following phrases:

Having said that

Differing from

In spite of

With this in mind

Provided that

Nevertheless

Nonetheless

Notwithstanding

Example: Shakespearean plays are classic works of literature that have stood the test of time. Having said that , I would argue that Shakespeare isn’t the most accessible form of literature to teach students in the twenty-first century.

Good essays include multiple types of logic. You can use a combination of the transitions above to create a strong, clear structure throughout the body of your essay.

Strong Verbs for Academic Writing

Verbs are especially important for writing clear essays. Often, you can convey a nuanced meaning simply by choosing the right verb.

You should use strong verbs that are precise and dynamic. Whenever possible, you should use an unambiguous verb, rather than a generic verb.

For example, alter and fluctuate are stronger verbs than change , because they give the reader more descriptive detail.

Here are some useful verbs that will help make your essay shine.

Verbs that show change:

Accommodate

Verbs that relate to causing or impacting something:

Verbs that show increase:

Verbs that show decrease:

Deteriorate

Verbs that relate to parts of a whole:

Comprises of

Is composed of

Constitutes

Encompasses

Incorporates

Verbs that show a negative stance:

Misconstrue

Verbs that show a negative stance

Verbs that show a positive stance:

Substantiate

Verbs that relate to drawing conclusions from evidence:

Corroborate

Demonstrate

Verbs that relate to thinking and analysis:

Contemplate

Hypothesize

Investigate

Verbs that relate to showing information in a visual format:

Useful Adjectives and Adverbs for Academic Essays

You should use adjectives and adverbs more sparingly than verbs when writing essays, since they sometimes add unnecessary fluff to sentences.

However, choosing the right adjectives and adverbs can help add detail and sophistication to your essay.

Sometimes you'll need to use an adjective to show that a finding or argument is useful and should be taken seriously. Here are some adjectives that create positive emphasis:

Significant

Other times, you'll need to use an adjective to show that a finding or argument is harmful or ineffective. Here are some adjectives that create a negative emphasis:

Controversial

Insignificant

Questionable

Unnecessary

Unrealistic

Finally, you might need to use an adverb to lend nuance to a sentence, or to express a specific degree of certainty. Here are some examples of adverbs that are often used in essays:

Comprehensively

Exhaustively

Extensively

Respectively

Surprisingly

Using these words will help you successfully convey the key points you want to express. Once you’ve nailed the body of your essay, it’s time to move on to the conclusion.

The conclusion of your paper is important for synthesizing the arguments you’ve laid out and restating your thesis.

In your concluding paragraph, try using some of these essay words:

In conclusion

To summarize

In a nutshell

Given the above

As described

All things considered

Example: In conclusion , it’s imperative that we take action to address climate change before we lose our coral reefs forever.

In addition to simply summarizing the key points from the body of your essay, you should also add some final takeaways. Give the reader your final opinion and a bit of a food for thought.

To place emphasis on a certain point or a key fact, use these essay words:

Unquestionably

Undoubtedly

Particularly

Importantly

Conclusively

It should be noted

On the whole

Example: Ada Lovelace is unquestionably a powerful role model for young girls around the world, and more of our public school curricula should include her as a historical figure.

These concluding phrases will help you finish writing your essay in a strong, confident way.

There are many useful essay words out there that we didn't include in this article, because they are specific to certain topics.

If you're writing about biology, for example, you will need to use different terminology than if you're writing about literature.

So how do you improve your vocabulary skills?

The vocabulary you use in your academic writing is a toolkit you can build up over time, as long as you take the time to learn new words.

One way to increase your vocabulary is by looking up words you don’t know when you’re reading.

Try reading more books and academic articles in the field you’re writing about and jotting down all the new words you find. You can use these words to bolster your own essays.

You can also consult a dictionary or a thesaurus. When you’re using a word you’re not confident about, researching its meaning and common synonyms can help you make sure it belongs in your essay.

Don't be afraid of using simpler words. Good essay writing boils down to choosing the best word to convey what you need to say, not the fanciest word possible.

Finally, you can use ProWritingAid’s synonym tool or essay checker to find more precise and sophisticated vocabulary. Click on weak words in your essay to find stronger alternatives.

ProWritingAid offering synonyms for great

There you have it: our compilation of the best words and phrases to use in your next essay . Good luck!

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Good writing = better grades

ProWritingAid will help you improve the style, strength, and clarity of all your assignments.

Hannah Yang is a speculative fiction writer who writes about all things strange and surreal. Her work has appeared in Analog Science Fiction, Apex Magazine, The Dark, and elsewhere, and two of her stories have been finalists for the Locus Award. Her favorite hobbies include watercolor painting, playing guitar, and rock climbing. You can follow her work on hannahyang.com, or subscribe to her newsletter for publication updates.

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How to write a perfect essay

Need to write an essay? Does the assignment feel as big as climbing Mount Everest? Fear not. You’re up to the challenge! The following step-by step tips from the Nat Geo Kids Almanac will help you with this monumental task. 

Sometimes the subject matter of your essay is assigned to you, sometimes it’s not. Either way, you have to decide what you want to say. Start by brainstorming some ideas, writing down any thoughts you have about the subject. Then read over everything you’ve come up with and consider which idea you think is the strongest. Ask yourself what you want to write about the most. Keep in mind the goal of your essay. Can you achieve the goal of the assignment with this topic? If so, you’re good to go.

WRITE A TOPIC SENTENCE

This is the main idea of your essay, a statement of your thoughts on the subject. Again, consider the goal of your essay. Think of the topic sentence as an introduction that tells your reader what the rest of your essay will be about.

OUTLINE YOUR IDEAS

Once you have a good topic sentence, you then need to support that main idea with more detailed information, facts, thoughts, and examples. These supporting points answer one question about your topic sentence—“Why?” This is where research and perhaps more brainstorming come in. Then organize these points in the way you think makes the most sense, probably in order of importance. Now you have an outline for your essay.

ON YOUR MARK, GET SET, WRITE!

Follow your outline, using each of your supporting points as the topic sentence of its own paragraph. Use descriptive words to get your ideas across to the reader. Go into detail, using specific information to tell your story or make your point. Stay on track, making sure that everything you include is somehow related to the main idea of your essay. Use transitions to make your writing flow.

Finish your essay with a conclusion that summarizes your entire essay and 5 restates your main idea.

PROOFREAD AND REVISE

Check for errors in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. Look for ways to make your writing clear, understandable, and interesting. Use descriptive verbs, adjectives, or adverbs when possible. It also helps to have someone else read your work to point out things you might have missed. Then make the necessary corrections and changes in a second draft. Repeat this revision process once more to make your final draft as good as you can.

Download the pdf .

Homework help

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  • School Education /

Essay on My First Day in School: Sample in 100, 200, 350 Words

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  • Updated on  
  • Jan 23, 2024

Essay on my first day in school

Essay on My First Day in School: The first day of school is often considered an important day in every child’s life. It is a time of a mix of emotions, like nervousness, excitement, homesickness, feelings of shyness, and likewise. But did you know these feelings are responsible for making our day memorable?

As children, we all are like a blank canvas, easily dyed into any colour. Our first day in school is like a new world to us. As a child, we all have experienced those feelings. So, to make you feel nostalgic and refresh those special feelings, we have brought some samples of essay on my first day in school.

Master the art of essay writing with our blog on How to Write an Essay in English .

This Blog Includes:

Essay on my first day in school in 100 words, essay on my first day in school sample in 200 words, essay on my first day in day in school in 350 words.

It was a cloudy day when I took my first step into the compound of my school. I was carrying a new backpack that was filled with notebooks. Though the backpack was a bit heavy, instead of focusing on the weight, I was excited about the beginning of my journey on my first day in school.

My classroom was at the end of the corridor. As I entered my classroom, my class teacher introduced me to the class and made me feel welcome. Activities like reading, solving problems in groups, and sharing our lunch boxes slowly and steadily transformed the new student with a sense of belonging.

The whole day progressed with mixed excitement as well as emotions. As the bell rang, declaring the end of the school day, the school felt like a world of possibilities where the journey was more than textbooks.

To improve your essay writing skills, here are the top 200+ English Essay Topics for school students.

Also Read: Speech on Republic Day for Class 12th

It was a sunny day and the sun was shining brightly. With my new and attractive backpack, I was moving through the school gate. It was my first day in school and I was filled with nervousness and excitement. From the tower of the building to the playground everything was bigger than life. As a school student, I was about to enter a new world. 

The corridor was filled with the echo of students. As I entered the classroom, wearing a mix of curiosity and excitement, my classmates and class teacher welcomed me with a warm smile. After a round of introductions and some warm-up activities, strangers gradually started tuning into potential friends. At lunchtime, the cafeteria was filled with the smell of delicious food. However, I hesitated before joining the group of students but soon enough, I was laughing with my new friends and sharing stories. The unfamiliar were now my friends and transformed my mixed emotions into delightfulness. 

The bell rang for the next class and I stepped out for new learning in my new academic home. My first day of school had many memorable stories, with old subjects and new introductions of knowledge. The day was spent learning, sharing and making new memories. 

Also Read: Essay on Joint Family in 500+ words in English  

My first day in school started by stepping onto the school bus with a bag full of books and a heart full of curiosity. It was like I was starting a new chapter in my life. After traveling a long way back, I stepped at the gate of my school. The school gate welcomed me with open arms and greeted me with a sense of excitement as well as nervousness.

As I entered the classroom, I found many new faces. Arranging my stuff on the seat, I sat next to an unknown, who later on turned into the best friend of my life. I entered my class with a welcoming smile, and later on, I turned everything in with ease. During our lunchtime, the cafeteria was filled with the energy of students. 

At first, I hesitated to interact with the children, but later on, I was a part of a group that invited me to join the table. At lunchtime, I made many new friends and was no longer a stranger. After having delicious food and chit-chatting with friends, we get back to our respective classrooms. Different subjects such as mathematics, science, and English never left the same impact as they did on the first day of school. 

The teacher taught the lessons so interestingly that we learned the chapter with a mix of laughter and learning. At the end of the day, we all went straight to the playground and enjoyed the swings. Moreover, in the playground, I also met many faces who were new to the school and had their first day in school, like me.

While returning home, I realised that my first day was not just about learning new subjects; it was about making new friends, sailing into new vibrant classrooms, and settling myself as a new student. The morning, which was full of uncertainty at the end of the day, came to an end with exciting adventures and endless possibilities. With new experiences, I look forward to new academic and personal growth in the wonderful world of education.

Also Read: Leave Letter for Stomach Pain: Format and Samples

My first day of school was filled with mixed feelings. I was nervous, homesick, and excited on the first day at my school.

While writing about the first day of school, I share my experience of beginning my journey from home. What were my feelings, emotions, and excitement related to the first day of school, and how did I deal with a whole day among the unknown faces, these were some of the things I wrote in my first day of school experience essay. 

The first day of school is important because, as a new student, we manage everything new. The practice of managing everything is the first step towards self-responsibility.

Along with studying my favourite subjects, I share fun moments and delicious foods with my friends in school. 

Parents are filled with emotions on the first day of their child. As school is the place to gain knowledge, skills, and experience, parents try their best to give their children the best academics they can.

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Deepika Joshi

Deepika Joshi is an experienced content writer with expertise in creating educational and informative content. She has a year of experience writing content for speeches, essays, NCERT, study abroad and EdTech SaaS. Her strengths lie in conducting thorough research and ananlysis to provide accurate and up-to-date information to readers. She enjoys staying updated on new skills and knowledge, particulary in education domain. In her free time, she loves to read articles, and blogs with related to her field to further expand her expertise. In personal life, she loves creative writing and aspire to connect with innovative people who have fresh ideas to offer.

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  • How to write an essay introduction | 4 steps & examples

How to Write an Essay Introduction | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on February 4, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on July 23, 2023.

A good introduction paragraph is an essential part of any academic essay . It sets up your argument and tells the reader what to expect.

The main goals of an introduction are to:

  • Catch your reader’s attention.
  • Give background on your topic.
  • Present your thesis statement —the central point of your essay.

This introduction example is taken from our interactive essay example on the history of Braille.

The invention of Braille was a major turning point in the history of disability. The writing system of raised dots used by visually impaired people was developed by Louis Braille in nineteenth-century France. In a society that did not value disabled people in general, blindness was particularly stigmatized, and lack of access to reading and writing was a significant barrier to social participation. The idea of tactile reading was not entirely new, but existing methods based on sighted systems were difficult to learn and use. As the first writing system designed for blind people’s needs, Braille was a groundbreaking new accessibility tool. It not only provided practical benefits, but also helped change the cultural status of blindness. This essay begins by discussing the situation of blind people in nineteenth-century Europe. It then describes the invention of Braille and the gradual process of its acceptance within blind education. Subsequently, it explores the wide-ranging effects of this invention on blind people’s social and cultural lives.

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Table of contents

Step 1: hook your reader, step 2: give background information, step 3: present your thesis statement, step 4: map your essay’s structure, step 5: check and revise, more examples of essay introductions, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about the essay introduction.

Your first sentence sets the tone for the whole essay, so spend some time on writing an effective hook.

Avoid long, dense sentences—start with something clear, concise and catchy that will spark your reader’s curiosity.

The hook should lead the reader into your essay, giving a sense of the topic you’re writing about and why it’s interesting. Avoid overly broad claims or plain statements of fact.

Examples: Writing a good hook

Take a look at these examples of weak hooks and learn how to improve them.

  • Braille was an extremely important invention.
  • The invention of Braille was a major turning point in the history of disability.

The first sentence is a dry fact; the second sentence is more interesting, making a bold claim about exactly  why the topic is important.

  • The internet is defined as “a global computer network providing a variety of information and communication facilities.”
  • The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education.

Avoid using a dictionary definition as your hook, especially if it’s an obvious term that everyone knows. The improved example here is still broad, but it gives us a much clearer sense of what the essay will be about.

  • Mary Shelley’s  Frankenstein is a famous book from the nineteenth century.
  • Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is often read as a crude cautionary tale about the dangers of scientific advancement.

Instead of just stating a fact that the reader already knows, the improved hook here tells us about the mainstream interpretation of the book, implying that this essay will offer a different interpretation.

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Next, give your reader the context they need to understand your topic and argument. Depending on the subject of your essay, this might include:

  • Historical, geographical, or social context
  • An outline of the debate you’re addressing
  • A summary of relevant theories or research about the topic
  • Definitions of key terms

The information here should be broad but clearly focused and relevant to your argument. Don’t give too much detail—you can mention points that you will return to later, but save your evidence and interpretation for the main body of the essay.

How much space you need for background depends on your topic and the scope of your essay. In our Braille example, we take a few sentences to introduce the topic and sketch the social context that the essay will address:

Now it’s time to narrow your focus and show exactly what you want to say about the topic. This is your thesis statement —a sentence or two that sums up your overall argument.

This is the most important part of your introduction. A  good thesis isn’t just a statement of fact, but a claim that requires evidence and explanation.

The goal is to clearly convey your own position in a debate or your central point about a topic.

Particularly in longer essays, it’s helpful to end the introduction by signposting what will be covered in each part. Keep it concise and give your reader a clear sense of the direction your argument will take.

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As you research and write, your argument might change focus or direction as you learn more.

For this reason, it’s often a good idea to wait until later in the writing process before you write the introduction paragraph—it can even be the very last thing you write.

When you’ve finished writing the essay body and conclusion , you should return to the introduction and check that it matches the content of the essay.

It’s especially important to make sure your thesis statement accurately represents what you do in the essay. If your argument has gone in a different direction than planned, tweak your thesis statement to match what you actually say.

To polish your writing, you can use something like a paraphrasing tool .

You can use the checklist below to make sure your introduction does everything it’s supposed to.

Checklist: Essay introduction

My first sentence is engaging and relevant.

I have introduced the topic with necessary background information.

I have defined any important terms.

My thesis statement clearly presents my main point or argument.

Everything in the introduction is relevant to the main body of the essay.

You have a strong introduction - now make sure the rest of your essay is just as good.

  • Argumentative
  • Literary analysis

This introduction to an argumentative essay sets up the debate about the internet and education, and then clearly states the position the essay will argue for.

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its critical benefits for students and educators—as a uniquely comprehensive and accessible information source; a means of exposure to and engagement with different perspectives; and a highly flexible learning environment.

This introduction to a short expository essay leads into the topic (the invention of the printing press) and states the main point the essay will explain (the effect of this invention on European society).

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

This introduction to a literary analysis essay , about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein , starts by describing a simplistic popular view of the story, and then states how the author will give a more complex analysis of the text’s literary devices.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is often read as a crude cautionary tale. Arguably the first science fiction novel, its plot can be read as a warning about the dangers of scientific advancement unrestrained by ethical considerations. In this reading, and in popular culture representations of the character as a “mad scientist”, Victor Frankenstein represents the callous, arrogant ambition of modern science. However, far from providing a stable image of the character, Shelley uses shifting narrative perspectives to gradually transform our impression of Frankenstein, portraying him in an increasingly negative light as the novel goes on. While he initially appears to be a naive but sympathetic idealist, after the creature’s narrative Frankenstein begins to resemble—even in his own telling—the thoughtlessly cruel figure the creature represents him as.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

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  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

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Your essay introduction should include three main things, in this order:

  • An opening hook to catch the reader’s attention.
  • Relevant background information that the reader needs to know.
  • A thesis statement that presents your main point or argument.

The length of each part depends on the length and complexity of your essay .

The “hook” is the first sentence of your essay introduction . It should lead the reader into your essay, giving a sense of why it’s interesting.

To write a good hook, avoid overly broad statements or long, dense sentences. Try to start with something clear, concise and catchy that will spark your reader’s curiosity.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

The structure of an essay is divided into an introduction that presents your topic and thesis statement , a body containing your in-depth analysis and arguments, and a conclusion wrapping up your ideas.

The structure of the body is flexible, but you should always spend some time thinking about how you can organize your essay to best serve your ideas.

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Write a composition (350 - 400 words) on the following: Write an original short story that begins with the words: "It was raining hard that night. In my hurry to get into the house, I didn't notice the black car parked across the road. I realized something was wrong when...............

It was raining hard that night. in my hurry to get into the house, i didn't notice the black car parked across the road. i realized something was wrong when i could see someone hovering around the car. i wasn't sure if it was safe to go to the car to investigate but my instincts dragged me from the gate of my building to across the road and next to the car. what happened in that half an hour is what i call my most unforgettable memory. i could see a man pacing up and down, drenched and injured. at first when i saw him, he looked inebriated as he was losing his balance now and then. but as i went near him, i was sure it was the injury and not any substance that was causing him to tip. excuse me sir can i help you i asked him. he seemed to be in a state of shock. i tried calling out to him but he continued going round and round his car. i was not comfortable reaching out to him physically and i thought he might attack me in his condition. but there was no one i could call as my phone had switched off after getting wet in the rain. also, if i went home, which was just across the street, my over-protective mother would panic and wouldn't let me help him. so there i was, feeling helpless and angry, because i decided to help someone without knowing what to do. i remember standing in the rain for quite some time, staring at the man hovering around his car, feeling absolutely worthless. then in a flash of a moment, i found myself walking towards him and reaching out to his shoulder. i must have been really stupid to do that sir i shouted as i grabbed his shoulder, can you tell me your name do you live around herethe man seemed to have lost his ability to hear or see or feel as he continued to walk around his car, only that now he was crying and shivering .because of the rain. i grabbed both his shoulders and tried to talk again. i will help you tell me what i you want is this your car i repeatedly asked him the above questions for at least five minutes before his finally looked at me and broke down. at that point, to be honest, i was scared to death, because he wouldn't stop screaming and trembling. after a while, he began to come back to his senses and began to calm down. finally, when he stopped crying, he looked at me and told me that he was a second-year du student who was out for a school reunion party at one of the schoolmates farmhouse on the outskirts of the city. he had happily agreed to go for the party because obviously we are always excited to meet our school buddies and relive the happy school memories. when he entered the farmhouse, he told me that everything was fine for a couple of hours. he then said that they began playing a game which turned into an unpleasant episode of bullying him. he was majorly bullied by a school group when in school and at the party too, the group started bullying him. when he retaliated, they faked an apology and offered him a drink. i was foolish to assume that they were truly sorry and that they had grown up, he told me, now smiling as if recollecting what happened at the party. he told me that he doesn't remember what happened after he took that drink. he only remembers me screaming at him. when i regained consciousness, my head hurt and i was lying on the street, drenched, outside my car. i don't even know what part of the city i am in. they must have put me in the car and brought me here. and they must have thrown me out of my own car and thrown away the keys after locking it so that i cant go home. the man, whose name was kabir, thanked me for being there. he asked me which place he had been abandoned, and asked the way to the nearest police station. i took him with me and told our complex watchman to guard his car for the night. my mother calmed down as she heard the whole story and nursed his wounds. kabir slept at my place that night. the next morning, mom and i accompanied him to the police station and lodged an fir. kabir said he wanted to get a blood test done as he thought he had been made to take drugs through the drink. he was right. he gave the details of the farmhouse and of his friends. the police sealed the farmhouse and arrested the friends. kabir and i became good friends forever after the incident. he taught me to be cautious of people, because some people can never be trusted no matter how much time has passed. he also taught me that it is okay to have a moment of fear. if you have a helping hand around, you can overcome fear and get back on your feet again..

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The Loss of Things I Took for Granted

Ten years into my college teaching career, students stopped being able to read effectively..

Recent years have seen successive waves of book bans in Republican-controlled states, aimed at pulling any text with “woke” themes from classrooms and library shelves. Though the results sometimes seem farcical, as with the banning of Art Spiegelman’s Maus due to its inclusion of “cuss words” and explicit rodent nudity, the book-banning agenda is no laughing matter. Motivated by bigotry, it has already done demonstrable harm and promises to do more. But at the same time, the appropriate response is, in principle, simple. Named individuals have advanced explicit policies with clear goals and outcomes, and we can replace those individuals with people who want to reverse those policies. That is already beginning to happen in many places, and I hope those successes will continue until every banned book is restored.

If and when that happens, however, we will not be able to declare victory quite yet. Defeating the open conspiracy to deprive students of physical access to books will do little to counteract the more diffuse confluence of forces that are depriving students of the skills needed to meaningfully engage with those books in the first place. As a college educator, I am confronted daily with the results of that conspiracy-without-conspirators. I have been teaching in small liberal arts colleges for over 15 years now, and in the past five years, it’s as though someone flipped a switch. For most of my career, I assigned around 30 pages of reading per class meeting as a baseline expectation—sometimes scaling up for purely expository readings or pulling back for more difficult texts. (No human being can read 30 pages of Hegel in one sitting, for example.) Now students are intimidated by anything over 10 pages and seem to walk away from readings of as little as 20 pages with no real understanding. Even smart and motivated students struggle to do more with written texts than extract decontextualized take-aways. Considerable class time is taken up simply establishing what happened in a story or the basic steps of an argument—skills I used to be able to take for granted.

Since this development very directly affects my ability to do my job as I understand it, I talk about it a lot. And when I talk about it with nonacademics, certain predictable responses inevitably arise, all questioning the reality of the trend I describe. Hasn’t every generation felt that the younger cohort is going to hell in a handbasket? Haven’t professors always complained that educators at earlier levels are not adequately equipping their students? And haven’t students from time immemorial skipped the readings?

The response of my fellow academics, however, reassures me that I’m not simply indulging in intergenerational grousing. Anecdotally, I have literally never met a professor who did not share my experience. Professors are also discussing the issue in academic trade publications , from a variety of perspectives. What we almost all seem to agree on is that we are facing new obstacles in structuring and delivering our courses, requiring us to ratchet down expectations in the face of a ratcheting down of preparation. Yes, there were always students who skipped the readings, but we are in new territory when even highly motivated honors students struggle to grasp the basic argument of a 20-page article. Yes, professors never feel satisfied that high school teachers have done enough, but not every generation of professors has had to deal with the fallout of No Child Left Behind and Common Core. Finally, yes, every generation thinks the younger generation is failing to make the grade— except for the current cohort of professors, who are by and large more invested in their students’ success and mental health and more responsive to student needs than any group of educators in human history. We are not complaining about our students. We are complaining about what has been taken from them.

If we ask what has caused this change, there are some obvious culprits. The first is the same thing that has taken away almost everyone’s ability to focus—the ubiquitous smartphone. Even as a career academic who studies the Quran in Arabic for fun, I have noticed my reading endurance flagging. I once found myself boasting at a faculty meeting that I had read through my entire hourlong train ride without looking at my phone. My colleagues agreed this was a major feat, one they had not achieved recently. Even if I rarely attain that high level of focus, though, I am able to “turn it on” when demanded, for instance to plow through a big novel during a holiday break. That’s because I was able to develop and practice those skills of extended concentration and attentive reading before the intervention of the smartphone. For children who were raised with smartphones, by contrast, that foundation is missing. It is probably no coincidence that the iPhone itself, originally released in 2007, is approaching college age, meaning that professors are increasingly dealing with students who would have become addicted to the dopamine hit of the omnipresent screen long before they were introduced to the more subtle pleasures of the page.

The second go-to explanation is the massive disruption of school closures during COVID-19. There is still some debate about the necessity of those measures, but what is not up for debate any longer is the very real learning loss that students suffered at every level. The impact will inevitably continue to be felt for the next decade or more, until the last cohort affected by the mass “pivot to online” finally graduates. I doubt that the pandemic closures were the decisive factor in themselves, however. Not only did the marked decline in reading resilience start before the pandemic, but the students I am seeing would have already been in high school during the school closures. Hence they would be better equipped to get something out of the online format and, more importantly, their basic reading competence would have already been established.

Less discussed than these broader cultural trends over which educators have little control are the major changes in reading pedagogy that have occurred in recent decades—some motivated by the ever-increasing demand to “teach to the test” and some by fads coming out of schools of education. In the latter category is the widely discussed decline in phonics education in favor of the “balanced literacy” approach advocated by education expert Lucy Calkins (who has more recently come to accept the need for more phonics instruction). I started to see the results of this ill-advised change several years ago, when students abruptly stopped attempting to sound out unfamiliar words and instead paused until they recognized the whole word as a unit. (In a recent class session, a smart, capable student was caught short by the word circumstances when reading a text out loud.) The result of this vibes-based literacy is that students never attain genuine fluency in reading. Even aside from the impact of smartphones, their experience of reading is constantly interrupted by their intentionally cultivated inability to process unfamiliar words.

For all the flaws of the balanced literacy method, it was presumably implemented by people who thought it would help. It is hard to see a similar motivation in the growing trend toward assigning students only the kind of short passages that can be included in a standardized test. Due in part to changes driven by the infamous Common Core standards , teachers now have to fight to assign their students longer readings, much less entire books, because those activities won’t feed directly into students getting higher test scores, which leads to schools getting more funding. The emphasis on standardized tests was always a distraction at best, but we have reached the point where it is actively cannibalizing students’ educational experience—an outcome no one intended or planned, and for which there is no possible justification.

We can’t go back in time and do the pandemic differently at this point, nor is there any realistic path to putting the smartphone genie back in the bottle. (Though I will note that we as a society do at least attempt to keep other addictive products out of the hands of children.) But I have to think that we can, at the very least, stop actively preventing young people from developing the ability to follow extended narratives and arguments in the classroom. Regardless of their profession or ultimate educational level, they will need those skills. The world is a complicated place. People—their histories and identities, their institutions and work processes, their fears and desires—are simply too complex to be captured in a worksheet with a paragraph and some reading comprehension questions. Large-scale prose writing is the best medium we have for capturing that complexity, and the education system should not be in the business of keeping students from learning how to engage effectively with it.

This is a matter not of snobbery, but of basic justice. I recognize that not everyone centers their lives on books as much as a humanities professor does. I think they’re missing out, but they’re adults and they can choose how to spend their time. What’s happening with the current generation is not that they are simply choosing TikTok over Jane Austen. They are being deprived of the ability to choose—for no real reason or benefit. We can and must stop perpetrating this crime on our young people.

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When you click through from our site to a retailer and buy a product or service, we may earn affiliate commissions. This helps support our work, but does not affect what we cover or how, and it does not affect the price you pay. Neither ZDNET nor the author are compensated for these independent reviews. Indeed, we follow strict guidelines that ensure our editorial content is never influenced by advertisers.

ZDNET's editorial team writes on behalf of you, our reader. Our goal is to deliver the most accurate information and the most knowledgeable advice possible in order to help you make smarter buying decisions on tech gear and a wide array of products and services. Our editors thoroughly review and fact-check every article to ensure that our content meets the highest standards. If we have made an error or published misleading information, we will correct or clarify the article. If you see inaccuracies in our content, please report the mistake via this form .

How to use Copilot Pro to write, edit, and analyze your Word documents

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Microsoft's Copilot Pro AI offers a few benefits for $20 per month. But the most helpful one is the AI-powered integration with the different Microsoft 365 apps. For those of you who use Microsoft Word, for instance, Copilot Pro can help you write and revise your text, provide summaries of your documents, and answer questions about any document.

First, you'll need a subscription to either Microsoft 365 Personal or Family . Priced at $70 per year, the Personal edition is geared for one individual signed into as many as five devices. At $100 per year, the Family edition is aimed at up to six people on as many as five devices. The core apps in the suite include Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote.

Also: Microsoft Copilot vs. Copilot Pro: Is the subscription fee worth it?

Second, you'll need the subscription to Copilot Pro if you don't already have one. To sign up, head to the Copilot Pro website . Click the Get Copilot Pro button. Confirm the subscription and the payment. The next time you use Copilot on the website, in Windows, or with the mobile apps, the Pro version will be in effect.

How to use Copilot Pro in Word

1. open word.

Launch Microsoft Word and open a blank document. Let's say you need help writing a particular type of document and want Copilot to create a draft. 

Also: Microsoft Copilot Pro vs. OpenAI's ChatGPT Plus: Which is worth your $20 a month?

A small "Draft with Copilot" window appears on the screen. If you don't see it, click the tiny "Draft with Copilot icon in the left margin."

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2. Submit your request

At the text field in the window, type a description of the text you need and click the "Generate" button.

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Submit your request.

3. Review the response and your options

Copilot generates and displays its response. After reading the response, you're presented with a few different options.

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Review the response and your options.

4. Keep, regenerate, or remove the draft

If you like the draft, click "Keep it." The draft is then inserted into your document where you can work with it. If you don't like the draft, click the "Regenerate" button, and a new draft is created. 

Also: What is Copilot (formerly Bing Chat)? Here's everything you need to know

If you'd prefer to throw out the entire draft and start from scratch, click the trash can icon.

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Keep, regenerate, or remove the draft.

5. Alter the draft

Alternatively, you can try to modify the draft by typing a specific request in the text field, such as "Make it more formal," "Make it shorter," or "Make it more casual."

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Alter the draft.

6. Review the different versions

If you opt to regenerate the draft, you can switch between the different versions by clicking the left or right arrow next to the number. You can then choose to keep the draft you prefer.

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7. Revise existing text

Copilot will also help you fine-tune existing text. Select the text you want to revise. Click the Copilot icon in the left margin and select "Rewrite with Copilot."

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Revise existing text.

8. Review the different versions

Copilot creates a few different versions of the text. Click the arrow keys to view each version.

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Review the different versions.

9. Replace or Insert

If you find one you like, click "Replace" to replace the text you selected. 

Also: ChatGPT vs. Microsoft Copilot vs. Gemini: Which is the best AI chatbot?

Click "Insert below" to insert the new draft below the existing words so you can compare the two.

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Replace or Insert.

10. Adjust the tone

Click "Regenerate" to ask Copilot to try again. Click the "Adjust Tone" button and select a different tone to generate another draft.

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Adjust the tone.

11. Turn text into a table

Sometimes you have text that would look and work better as a table. Copilot can help. Select the text you wish to turn into a table. Click the Copilot icon and select "Visualize as a Table."

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Turn text into a table.

12. Respond to the table

In response, click "Keep it" to retain the table. Click "Regenerate" to try again. Click the trash can icon to delete it. Otherwise, type a request in the text field, such as "remove the second row" or "make the last column wider."

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Respond to the table.

13. Summarize a document

Copilot Pro can provide a summary of a document with its key points. To try this, open the document you want to summarize and then click the Copilot icon on the Ribbon. 

Also: The best AI chatbots

The right sidebar displays several prompts you can use to start your question. Click the one for "Summarize this doc."

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Summarize a document.

14. Review the summary

View the generated summary in the sidebar. If you like it as is, click the "Copy" button to copy the summary and paste it elsewhere.

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Review the summary.

15. Revise the summary

Otherwise, choose one of the suggested questions or ask your own question to revise the summary. For example, you could tell Copilot to make the summary longer, shorter, more formal, or less formal. 

Also: The best AI image generators

You could also ask it to expand on one of the points in the summary or provide more details on a certain point. A specific response is then generated based on your request.

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Revise the summary.

16. Ask questions about a document

Next, you can ask specific questions about any of the content in a document. Again, click the Copilot icon to display the sidebar. In the prompt area, type and submit your question. Copilot displays the response in the sidebar. You can then ask follow-up questions as needed.

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Ask questions about a document.

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The Risky Words That Might Make School Admissions Suspect AI Wrote Your Essay

W hen the ChatGPT-mania kicked off last year, the first uproar emerged from the academia. Teachers were worried that students now had a potent tool to cheat on their assignments, and like clockwork, multiple AI plagiarism detectors popped up with variable degrees of accuracy. Students were worried that these AI plagiarism detectors could get them in trouble even if the error rate were low. Experts, on the other hand, opined that one needs to rely on intuition and natural language skills to detect signs of AI by looking for signatures such as repetitive phrases, an out-of-character use of words, a uniformly monotonous flow, and being more verbose than is needed in a regular human conversation.

No method is infallible, but the risk avenues keep spiraling out of control while the underlying large language models get even more nuanced in their word regurgitation skill. Among those avenues is the all-too-important essay required for college applications. According to a Forbes report, students are using AI tools to write their school and college essays, but academics and people on the admission committee have developed a knack for spotting AI word signatures. For example, one of the words that seems to pop up frequently in essays is "tapestry," which, honestly, is rarely ever used or heard in a conversation or even text-based material, save for poetry or works of English literature.

"I no longer believe there's a way to innocently use the word 'tapestry' in an essay; if the word 'tapestry' appears, it was generated by ChatGPT," one of the experts who edit college essays told Forbes. Unfortunately, he also warns that in the rare scenarios where an applicant inadvertently, and with good intentions, ends up using the word, they might face rejection by the admission committee over perceived plagiarism.

Read more: Major PC Monitor Brands Ranked Worst To Best

What To Avoid?

The Forbes report compiles responses from over 20 educational institutions, including top-tier names like Harvard and Princeton, about how exactly they are factoring AI while handling applications. While the institutions didn't provide any concrete answers in terms of a proper policy, members handling the task hinted that spotting AI usage in essays is pretty easy, both in terms of specific word selection, which they described as "thin, hollow, and flat," as well as the tone. Some independent editors have created an entire glossary of words and phrases that she often sees in essays and which she tweaks to give "human vibes" to the essays.

Some of the code-red AI signatures, which don't even require AI detection tools to spot them, include:

  • "leadership prowess"
  • "stems from a deep-seated passion"
  • "aligns seamlessly with my aspirations"
  • "commitment to continuous improvement and innovation"
  • "entrepreneurial/educational journey"

These are just a few giveaways of AI involvement. Moreover, they can change and may not even be relevant soon as more sophisticated models with better natural language capabilities arrive on the scene. Plus, people from non-academic domains appear to have established their own framework to detect AI-generated work. "If you have enough text, a really easy cue is the word 'the' occurs too many times," Google Brain scientist Daphne Ippolito said to MIT Technology Review . 

Ippolito also pointed out that generative AI models rarely make typos, which is a reverse-engineered way to assess if a piece of writing is the result of some AI tool. "A typo in the text is actually a really good indicator that it was human written," she notes. But it takes practice to be good at identifying the pattern, especially at reading aspects like unerring fluency and the lack of spontaneity.

It's All Still A Big Mess

An AI text generator is essentially a glorified parrot, which is exceptional at echoing but not so much at delivering surprises. Indeed, drafting an invitation email or shooting a message to your pals might seem like you're following a script, yet there's a whimsical flair to our human way of chatting that's quite the trick to nail down for an AI. Despite all the advancements that Google has made with its PaLM 2 or whatever it is that Meta or OpenAI continue to achieve with Llama 2 or GPT-4, it is simply not worth the risk to be using AI for college, work, or any other high-stakes task. 

One of the biggest reasons to avoid relying squarely on AI chatbots is their tendency to hallucinate, which is essentially an AI model cooking up an imaginary scenario and serving it as fact. Next, there is always a risk that the work can be flagged down the road, either by a keen human mind or the makers of these AI tools using some proprietary AI fingerprinting tool. There are already tools out there, such as GPTZero, that can spot AI plagiarism. However, those tools are also far from infallible , so there's a tangible risk that even an original work can be flagged as AI-generated garbage.

To avoid such a scenario, the best way is to enable a progress history feature , one that tracks how a piece of work moved ahead, one small at a time. For example, if you are into writing, products like Google Docs and Microsoft Word offer a version history system that essentially saves different versions of an ongoing work every time some change is made. The progress is saved, essentially creating a time-stamped proof of each stage. 

Read the original article on SlashGear .

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