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uga application essay prompts

University of Georgia Essay Example by an Accepted Student

uga application essay prompts

The University of Georgia is a large public research institute and one of the top public schools in the nation. If it is one of your school choices, it’s important to write strong essays to help your application stand out. In this post, we’ll share an essay a real student has submitted to the University of Georgia. (Names and identifying information have been changed, but all other details are preserved).

Please note: Looking at examples of real essays students have submitted to colleges can be very beneficial to get inspiration for your essays. You should never copy or plagiarize from these examples when writing your own essays. Colleges can tell when an essay isn’t genuine and will not view students favorably if they plagiarized. 

Read our University of Georgia es say breakdown to get a comprehensive overview of this year’s supplemental prompt.

Essay Example – Humor in Cooking

Prompt: Tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years.

Cooking is one of those activities at which people are either extremely talented or completely inept. Personally, I’ve found that I fall right in the middle, with neither prodigal nor abhorrent talents. After all, it’s just following instructions, right? Unfortunately, one disastrous night in my kitchen has me questioning that logic.

The task was simple enough: cook a turkey stir fry. In theory, it’s an extremely simple dish. However, almost immediately, things went awry. While I was cutting onions, I absentmindedly rubbed at my eyes and smeared my mascara. (Keep this in mind; it’ll come into play later.) I then proceeded to add the raw turkey to the vegetable pot. Now, as any good chef knows, this means that either the vegetables will burn or the turkey will be raw. I am admittedly not a good chef.

After a taste test, I decided to take a page out of the Spice Girls’ book and “spice up my life”, adding some red chili paste. This was my fatal mistake. The bottle spilled everywhere. Pot, counter, floor, I mean everywhere . While trying to clean up the mess, my hands ended up covered in sauce.

Foolishly, I decided to taste my ruined meal anyway. My tongue felt like it was on fire and I sprinted to the bathroom to rinse my mouth. I looked in the mirror and, noticing the raccoon eyes formed by my mascara, grabbed a tissue. What I had neglected to realize was that chili paste had transferred to the tissue—the tissue which I was using to wipe my eyes. I don’t know if you’ve ever put chili paste anywhere near your eyes, but here’s a word of advice: don’t. Seriously, don’t .

I fumbled blindly for the sink handle, mouth still on fire, eyes burning, presumably looking like a character out of a Tim Burton film. After I rinsed my face, I sat down and stared at my bowl of still-too-spicy and probably-somewhat-raw stir fry, wondering what ancient god had decided to take their anger out on me that night, and hoping I would never incur their wrath ever again.

What the Essay Did Well

This is a great essay for the prompt! Don’t assume that the admissions committee wants deep, personal stories with hard-earned lessons in every essay. They are people too, and they want to be engaged with  amusing stories. This essay does a great job of being light, playful, and funny, while still revealing a lot about the student who wrote it.

Starting off with the story the student chose, it works so well because it is so specific. Focusing the essay on a short period of time—making dinner—allows the student to include a lot of details that wouldn’t have fit in an essay that tried to explain their entire history with cooking. This is proof that zeroing in on what might seem like a mundane experience can make for a really strong essay.

Another thing this essay does really well is structure the story in a clear, sequential manner. The essay starts by setting expectations for the student’s cooking abilities, which builds anticipation for the reader. Then, the essay follows the various steps of the cooking process almost like following a recipe. The beginning of each paragraph establishes each new step of the story—”The task was simple enough”; “After a taste test”; “Foolishly, I decided to taste my ruined meal anyway”; “I fumbled blindly for the sink handle”—which creates momentum for the essay that makes reading it quick and easy.

Perhaps what makes this essay so stellar is how much the student’s voice shines through. This student is unapologetically themselves and admits to their shortcomings as a chef. By sharing a funny and embarrassing story, the admissions committee reading the essay gets a much better sense of the student’s character and personality than if they had shared a story about the time they scored the winning goal at the soccer game. The language is casual and informal and it feels much more like the student is telling a story than writing an essay, which should be the goal of any college essay.

Another aspect of this essay that really allows the student’s voice to shine and makes it so enjoyable to read is the humor. Including humor into essays can sometimes be hard, but when it’s done successfully it give the reader a sense of your personality and can brighten their day. Including interjections like “(Keep this in mind; it’ll come into play later.)” and references to pop culture like “I decided to take a page out of the Spice Girls’ book and ‘spice up my life'” gave the audiences little chuckles as they read. Especially for a prompt that wants an amusing story, the humorous tone and inclusion of jokes throughout the essay really made this essay stand out.

What Could Be Improved

There isn’t much this student could do to improve the essay. It’s very well-written and a perfect response to the prompt. However, to really strengthen the essay, the student could remove the first paragraph. The first paragraph isn’t bad, and it starts to introduce some of the humor seen throughout the essay, but it doesn’t directly relate to the story being told. Removing the first paragraph would allow the student to jump right into the action of the story and have more words to add details and more jokes during the rest of the essay.

Where to Get Your University of Georgia Essays Edited

Do you want feedback on your University of Georgia  essays? After rereading your essays countless times, it can be difficult to evaluate your writing objectively. That’s why we created our free Peer Essay Review tool , where you can get a free review of your essay from another student. You can also improve your own writing skills by reviewing other students’ essays. 

If you want a college admissions expert to review your essay, advisors on CollegeVine have helped students refine their writing and submit successful applications to top schools. Find the right advisor for you to improve your chances of getting into your dream school!

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For the Fall 2024 First-Year applicant group, there are three updates the UGA Admissions Office wants to make known when students are preparing to apply to UGA. We will be exclusively using the Common App for our First-Year applicants. We will still use our in-house application for non First-Year applicants such as transfer students, but […]

2023 Application Essays

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For the Fall 2023 class, UGA will be keeping the same essay questions as have had for the past few years. UGA will require two essays, a longer personal essay (250-650 words) and a shorter essay (200-300 words).  In addition, the Fall 2023 application will open up on August 1 in order to align our […]

Fall 2022 Application and Essay Information

  david graves        july 1st, 2021.

For the Fall 2022 class, UGA will be keeping the same essay questions as have had for the past few years. UGA will require two essays, a longer personal essay (250-650 words) and a shorter essay (200-300 words). The Common App has changed one essay in their list, and it is reflected here and on […]

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Big News!! For the UGA Freshman 2021 application, the UGA Admissions Office will accept the Common Application as an option for prospective student applicants. Okay, now that you have recovered from your shock (it only took us 10+ years to choose this option), here are the details for applying for next year. Applying UGA will […]

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2020 Freshman Essay Questions

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For the last few weeks, my shower has suddenly started to drip water, even with the handle set at full off. I could live with a tiny leak, but this was becoming a steady leak, leading to other issues. So this weekend, I took on the task of repairing my shower in my house. I […]

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The Ultimate Guide to the University of Georgia's Supplemental Essays

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Applying to the University of Georgia (UGA)? You're on the right path! UGA's beautiful campus, renowned academic programs, and spirit of community make it a top choice for many students. The college application process often comes with writing supplemental essays, and UGA is no exception. This blog post aims to guide you on how to best approach these UGA supplemental essays for the 2023-2024 admissions cycle.

UGA Supplemental Essay Prompt #1

The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application.

Approach: This prompt invites you to share a unique aspect of your high school life. It could be an anecdote about a memorable event, a surprising hobby, or an unusual skill you have. Keep the tone light and enjoyable to read. Show your personality through this essay; let your sense of humor or interesting perspective shine!

During my sophomore year of high school, I decided to try out for the school's ultimate frisbee team, despite never having touched a frisbee before. In my first practice, my throws looked more like lopsided boomerangs than smooth, flat discs. At the team’s first game, I was given the task of throwing the first "pull," the ultimate frisbee equivalent of a kickoff. My nerves took over, and instead of the frisbee soaring downfield, it flew straight up and then veered right, landing in the nearby tennis court. This sparked a roaring laughter from both teams, and even the referee couldn’t contain his chuckles. I was mortified but joined the laughter because of the absurdity of the situation. That moment of shared laughter taught me the value of not taking myself too seriously and helped me bond with my teammates. By the end of the season, my throws had improved, and while I'll never be an ultimate frisbee champion, I'll always be the champion of good humor on the team.

UGA Supplemental Essay Prompt #2

The University of Georgia community creates, contributes, and applies knowledge in many ways. Describe an example of your leadership and the impact it had on others.

Approach: Here, UGA wants to understand how you lead and contribute to a community. Reflect on moments when you stepped up to take charge—maybe in an academic setting, a club, a sports team, or volunteering. How did your leadership make a difference? Remember, leadership isn't just about being the president of a club. You could have demonstrated leadership through initiative, teamwork, or problem-solving.

In my junior year, I served as the project manager for our school's Robotics Club. Our team was tasked with designing a robot for a local competition, but we hit a snag when our design kept failing during tests. As project manager, I decided to take a new approach. I organized a brainstorming session, where everyone, including the newest members, was encouraged to propose solutions. One of the freshman members suggested a minor adjustment to the weight distribution, which many had overlooked. His solution turned out to be the key to fixing our design! By fostering an environment where every voice was valued, we not only built a successful robot but also strengthened our team cohesion.

UGA Supplemental Essay Prompt #3 (Optional)

In our diverse and interdependent world, please tell us about an experience that demonstrated or gave you the opportunity to understand the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Approach: UGA values diversity and inclusion, and this prompt asks you to share an experience where you came to understand its significance. It could be a personal encounter, an event, or a revelation from a book or film. The key is to convey your ability to learn from diverse perspectives and experiences and to contribute to an inclusive campus culture.

In high school, I volunteered for a local organization that supports refugee resettlement. One of my primary tasks involved tutoring a young girl from Syria. The language barrier and cultural differences made the task challenging at first, but I gradually found ways to connect with her through visuals, storytelling, and games. The experience showed me the value of patience, empathy, and open-mindedness in understanding and appreciating the diverse backgrounds and experiences of others. It also reinforced the importance of equity in access to education, regardless of one's origins.

UGA Supplemental Essay Short Answer Question

UGA’s 2023 First-Year Odyssey Program offers more than 300 seminar courses for new students. Which do you find most appealing and why?

Approach: Research is key here. Explore the First-Year Odyssey program, select a seminar that genuinely interests you, and articulate why. Link it back to your academic interests, career goals, or intellectual curiosity.

Sure, let's dive into example responses for each of the University of Georgia supplemental essays.

UGA Supplemental Essay Prompt #3

I find "Unleashing Creativity Through Visual Storytelling" particularly appealing among UGA's First-Year Odyssey seminars. As a budding filmmaker, this course aligns with my passion for storytelling and my desire to delve deeper into the techniques of visual narration. The opportunity to analyze the work of acclaimed filmmakers and apply those insights to a project of my own is thrilling. Moreover, it would be invaluable in preparing me for my intended major in Film Studies.

Remember, your essays are a chance to showcase your personality, experiences, values, and goals. Be authentic, thoughtful, and concise. Tailor your responses to UGA, showing why you're a good fit for their community.

Related posts

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Demystifying Georgetown University's Supplemental 2023-2024 Essays

uga application essay prompts

The Comprehensive Guide to the University of Georgia

UGA Supplemental Essay 2023-24 – Prompt and Advice

July 14, 2023

uga application essay prompts

Over 43,000 students from around the world applied for a place in the UGA Class of 2027 . Further, the EA round in the 2022-23 cycle broke the previous year’s all-time high mark. This means that the UGA supplemental essay may be even more important in 2023-24 than in previous years.

Last year, the average incoming freshman took 10 AP, IB, or dual enrollment courses in high school. The average student also earned a weighted GPA above a 4.0. The GPA range for admitted freshmen was 1270-1470. The purpose of this information isn’t to engender fear in the hearts of Bulldog hopefuls; rather, we want to make sure that you take the task of presenting yourself in the best possible light very seriously.

 (Want to learn more about How to Get Into the University of Georgia? Visit our blog entitled:  How to Get Into the University of Georgia: Admissions Data and Strategies  for all of the most recent admissions data as well as tips for gaining acceptance.)

Although it only has one (brand new) general essay prompt, UGA’s supplemental section still affords applicants an opportunity to illustrate what makes them uniquely qualified for admission. Below is the University of Georgia’s supplemental prompt for the 2023-24 admissions cycle along with our advice for composing an effective essay.

2023-2024 University of Georgia Essay Question

“The transition from middle to high school is a key time for students as they reach new levels of both academic and personal discovery. Please share a book (novel, non-fiction, etc.) that had a serious impact on you during this time. Please focus more on why this book made an impact on you and less on the plot/theme of the book itself (we are not looking for a book report).”

FYI – We are not restricting you to the exact years of 8th-9th grades, but rather the general timeframe of the middle to high school transition, which can extend somewhat further than one year on each end. Feel free to use your discretion in your choice of the timeline focused on the shift to your high school years.

(200-300 Words)

UGA Supplemental Essays 2023-24 (Continued)

This isn’t your average supplemental essay so make sure you don’t produce an average response. The highly personal nature of this prompt gives you the chance to make a strong impression on a UGA admissions officer. Since you won’t have a chance to interview at this large flagship school, this essay (as well as the main Common App essay) is one of the best chances you’ll have to forge an intimate connection with a member of the admissions committee.

You may have to dig back into your childhood bookshelves for this one. If you are having trouble, referring to the following lists may jog your memory:

Common Middle School-Assigned Texts

  • The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Night by Elie Wiesel
  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • Roll of Thunder , Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
  • The entire Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling
  • Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  • The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  • The Pigman by Paul Zindel
  • Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Common 10th-Grade Assigned Texts

  • Animal Farm by George Orwell
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
  • Hiroshima by John Hersey
  • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
  • The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe
  • Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  • The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  • Walden by Henry David Thoreau
  • Black Boy by Richard Wright

Of course, the book you pick may not have been assigned by a teacher, Additionally, note that the instructions give you the right to move back into 7th grade or forward into 10th grade if you wish. Remember, it can be a fiction or non-fiction text.

Big-picture thoughts on the “middle school book” essay

With a 300-word limit, you have a substantial amount of real estate to play around with here. There is enough space in which to tell a fairly substantial and detailed story. Still, in all likelihood, getting this one precisely right will involve a round or two of revision, ideally with some insight and feedback from a trusted adult or peer in the process. Some tips to keep in mind include:

  • Don’t feel boxed into one particular structure for this essay. You could tell a story in multiple acts or present a slice-of-life vignette that took place in a single afternoon.
  • You can use this opportunity to reveal something deep and meaningful about your personality/character.
  • Make sure the content of this essay doesn’t overlap with your Common App essay. Always remember that an actual human being is going to be reading both documents; they don’t want to read two similar accounts of the same event.

How important is the UGA supplemental essay?

The essays (both the Common App essay and the supplemental one) are “considered” by the UGA admissions committee. This places them on the same tier of importance as recommendations, extracurricular activities, talent/ability, character/personal qualities, first-generation status, volunteer work, and work experience.

At UGA, three factors are “most important” in the admissions process. Those are: rigor of your coursework, GPA, and standardized test scores. However, application components like the supplemental essay can serve as a critical tie-breaker between similarly-credentialed applicants.

Want Personalized Essay Assistance with your UGA Supplemental Essay?

If you are interested in working with one of College Transitions’ experienced and knowledgeable essay coaches as you craft your UGA supplemental essay, we encourage you to get a quote  today.

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A licensed counselor and published researcher, Andrew's experience in the field of college admissions and transition spans two decades. He has previously served as a high school counselor, consultant and author for Kaplan Test Prep, and advisor to U.S. Congress, reporting on issues related to college admissions and financial aid.

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How to Ace the 2023/2024 UGA Supplemental Essays

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Maria Geiger is Director of Content at Scholarships360. She is a former online educational technology instructor and adjunct writing instructor. In addition to education reform, Maria’s interests include viewpoint diversity, blended/flipped learning, digital communication, and integrating media/web tools into the curriculum to better facilitate student engagement. Maria earned both a B.A. and an M.A. in English Literature from Monmouth University, an M. Ed. in Education from Monmouth University, and a Virtual Online Teaching Certificate (VOLT) from the University of Pennsylvania.

How to Ace the 2023/2024 UGA Supplemental Essays

Many colleges’ supplemental essay questions touch on common themes, such as your academic interests or what communities you belong to. The UGA supplemental essays, however, are a different story. The University of Georgia asks students to answer a unique, playful prompt that asks you to share a memorable high school story. 

Let’s explore this unconventional prompt and how to craft an excellent response. 

Also see:  How to write an essay about yourself

“The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application (200-350 words)” 

Try not to roll your eyes at an essay prompt saying it hopes to de-stress the college process. Seriously, embrace this message! There is still expectation to write a nice essay, of course; but trust that admissions wants you to stop putting so much pressure on yourself. Treat this space as an enjoyable opportunity to share a story reflective of your personality. Brainstorming with this more relaxed mindset ensures your voice comes across natural and authentic. 

At the same time, the openness of this response can be overwhelming. After all, high school comes with four years of ‘interesting’ and ‘amusing’ stories–how can you pick just one? Start by making a list of stories that stand out when you reflect on high school. Next, look at what you’ve conveyed about yourself through your personal statement and activities section. Which character traits have you not revealed that are key to who you are? Or, is there a value you emphasize throughout your application that another story can strengthen? 

Sample story ideas

One example could be writing about the time you completely bombed your tenth grade piano recital performance. This anecdote definitely ticks the ‘amusing’ response. Describing a cringe-worthy moment which you now laugh about showcases humility. It also reveals that you have hobbies, took a risk to play on-stage, and handled the embarrassment with composure and perseverance. 

Another route might be related to your intended major, graphic design. You could talk about making a mock-up of an album cover for your favorite artist. After DM’ing it to them on Instagram, the fact that they used your work on their next record is truly remarkable! This definitely qualifies as an ‘interesting’ story. It shows your initiative, talent, and genuine love for your area of study, as well. 

What is awesome about this prompt is the creative freedom it gives your writing. For the first example, you should set the scene by describing the iconic chords of “Bennie and the Jets” struck so egregiously so off-key. Then the panic that set in. Your mind going blank, fingers sweating. Almost throwing in the towel. The awkward applause. For the second example, the inspiration for the album. The hours spent tweaking the message you’d send in your favorite artist’s inbox. Show off your writing and storytelling skills here! 

Also see:  What looks good on college applications?

Questions to consider: 

  • Have you had any interactions with famous people or your role models?
  • What is a stroke of bad luck you’ve experienced? How did you deal with it? 
  • Do you have any impactful stories from traveling? 
  • What is your go-to icebreaker or fun fact? 

Also see:  How to write a 250 word essay

Additional resources

As you’re working on college applications, we’re sure that you’ve juggling a lot of tasks at once. There are many decisions to be made and things to accomplish. Luckily, we can help. Check out our guide on how many colleges to apply to , how to find safety, reach, and match schools , and how to get a college application fee waiver . We can also help you fill out your Common App Activities and Additional Information sections to ensure that you present every aspect of your application as best you can. Finally, check out our insider’s perspective of what happens inside a college admissions office to get an idea of how your application will be reviewed. Good luck!

Other colleges to consider

  • Georgia Tech (Atlanta, GA)
  • Tulane University (New Orleans, LA)
  • University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI)

Next steps for students

We hope you feel ready to rock the UGA supplemental essays after reading our guide. By now, you should have all the tools to take a successful trip down high school memory lane. Have fun with this prompt and your sincerity will be evident! Make sure that you apply for all the scholarships you qualify for too!

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How to write outstanding u georgia essays | guide & examples, 2022-2023, school supplements.

How to Write Outstanding U Georgia Essays | Guide & Examples, 2022-2023

Brad Schiller

We’re so glad you’re here.

That’s because one of the University of Georgia’s two required essays is among the trickiest of any school we know. Here it is: 

The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application.  

Oh, we know. It seems chill. Relaxed, fun, breezy. 

But that’s exactly the trap — it will lull you into telling a funny story that doesn’t actually boost your chances of admission. Or worse, lowers them. 

Join us below if you want a guide to:

  • the traps for the unwary in this UGA question and 
  • step-by-step advice for how to ace both it and the “Common App” personal statement prompt that’s also required.

(For help with all aspects of your college application, head to our College Essay Help Center .)

Think of your best “experiences” before you start answering either of these prompts

College essays are tools that serve a specific purpose — admissions officers use them to see if you’ll be successful at college and beyond . Sometimes, they do it with straightforward essay questions. Sometimes, as with UGA, they do it with a “fun” question. But what they’re actually looking for in the answer doesn’t really change. It’s about your potential.

With “fun” questions, it’s all the more important that you keep the focus of your answers on what you’ve done that shows you can be successful. You don’t want to get distracted. 

As you’ll learn if you walk through our free brainstorming materials in our dashboard (create a free account), Prompt’s method is first to spend time writing down all the experiences you’ve had in high school — think broadly of everything you’ve done academically, extracurricularly, with your family, at a job, over the summer, and independently. 

Your experiences will form the basis of your essays. As you develop your answers, start thinking about which of the 5 Traits you demonstrated in each experience. (The traits are: Drive, Initiative, Intellectual Curiosity, Contribution, and Diversity of Experiences.) 

The more you write with the traits in mind, the more you’ll add details that impress your admissions officers — and stay away from details that don’t add value. By the end of this process, you should have a lot of valuable info to share. 

Next, take the best experiences you’ve come up with — the ones that most exemplify one (or more) of the 5 traits and slate them in your two UGA slots:

  • Common App personal statement prompts (7 choices) — 250-650 words
  • Tell an “amusing story” about yourself — 200-300 words

We’ll tackle each below. 

Don’t take our examples too seriously — there are many “right” ways to answer UGA’s prompts

Quick interruption: at Prompt, we’re on record as being against modeling yourself on influencers , New York Times college essay writers , and, really, anyone who isn’t you.

On the other hand, we know that you want concrete examples of what our brilliant but (we’ll admit it) abstract advice can actually look like in practice. So, we’re illustrating with some made-up examples.

Please read them with a big grain of salt. You can have a different writing style. You can go a million other directions. And if the example sounds too impressive, it just might be — our examples are generally loosely based on real examples, but still fictional. You’re working with reality, and that tends to be harder.

With that caveat out of the way, back to our regularly scheduled programming. 

Q1 — Choose the right Common App prompt and write it fast and well using our proven method

Alright. Prompt has you so, so, so, so covered when it comes to the Common App personal statement.

First, here’s a really fun, quick article on how to choose the best of the 7 prompts (and avoid the trickier ones). 

Second, here’s the most comprehensive article you’ve ever read on how to write a personal essay that’s not only super-strong and acceptance-worthy but also doesn’t take forever to get done!

Yup. That’s it for #1. 

Let’s move on to #2. 

Q2 — Be light-hearted in your “amusing story” essay — but don’t lose sight of the goal to impress!

For the other UGA application essay, all applicants respond to the same prompt:

‍ The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application. (300 words max)

As we see it, there are two parts to acing this:

  • Answer in the spirit the question is asked — be “interesting or amusing,” not serious or pedantic, but also
  • Choose a story that shows off 1 or more of (you guessed it) the 5 traits

First, to be “interesting or amusing:”

  • Don’t aim for funny.
  • Unless it just comes out funny and other grownup people, ideally an essay coach , agree it’s funny.
  • Otherwise, don’t aim for funny. Funny is a lot harder than it seems. Just read any comedian’s memoirs , and you’ll know what we’re trying to say. 
  • “Interesting” is a better target to shoot for than “amusing.” “Quirky” or “unusual” could also be better guideposts than “amusing” to get you in the right spirit. 

True story: UGA has gone on record as lamenting the large number of recent essays that touched on “bodily functions.” Steer clear! Admissions officers aren’t into “gross-out” moments.

Second, to show off your traits: 

  • Ignore the prompt, and go to your brainstormed list of experiences.
  • Choose the best one that can reasonably fit this question.  
  • Feel good knowing you’re giving the admissions team exactly what they want.
  • And, we can’t say this too many times: what they want isn’t gross-out humor. 

Every morning, I make toast for my little sister before school. My parents are constantly worried: “Did Isabel eat this morning?” my mom will ask (she works an early shift, and can’t be home for breakfast). But I always make sure my sister eats. “You fed Isabel, right?” my dad will ask on the phone (he travels for work, and is rarely home on weekdays). But I never forget to feed Isabel.

Sometimes, Isabel says she’s not hungry, so we negotiate. Sometimes, she sleeps in, so I make it to-go. But always I make sure it happens. It’s a small, but deeply satisfying win for me — a way to set up larger wins for the day. 

Reflecting on how much I love these daily moments made me realize that they’re at the heart of what I want to build my life around: helping others. 

It’s why I re-started the Tutoring Club, which currently has 32 members who help younger students with homework 2 or more times per week. It’s why I tutor 3 students myself — and why I’m more proud of helping to raise their GPAs from an average of 3.1 to an average of 3.6. It’s why I survey tutors and tutored students every semester, to keep making the Club better — we now play soft music that everyone loves (I would never have thought of that!); we raised enough money for after-school snacks (good for concentration), and it’s why I had to “fire” a tutor once — a really hard thing to do, but a necessary one.

I want my life to be about helping people as tangibly and concretely as I do every morning when I make toast for my little sister: sometimes it’s a joy, sometimes it’s a challenge, but it’s never not meaningful. 

  • This essay focuses on contribution , one of the 5 traits.
  • The first part focuses on a small, intimate moment — you don’t need to be flashy.
  • The essay moves on to action steps the student took, with lots of specifics about Tutoring Club, showing more of the 5 traits ( drive to keep it successful; initiative to get it going). 

Helpful info on all the “other” stuff you’ll consider as you apply to U Georgia (and other schools)

Here are some additional resources that can help you ace every aspect of your U Georgia application:

  • Activities list: here’s how to write your activity list descriptions so they really impress. 
  • Common App : UGA allows you to use the Common App, Coalition App, or their own system. If you choose the first of those, we have a guide for acing everything to do with writing your Common App application . 
  • Applying early or regular : UGA offers “Early Action” as well as “Regular Decision.” Read our guide to early/regular decisions — it's a great overview of this decision at any school.  
  • Note: UGA is not test-optional . 

BTW, here’s our guidance for approaching any college supplement + here’s where you can find our guides for almost every college’s supplements . 

Feeling inspired? A great place to start is at our College Essay Help Center . 

More articles on Prompt.com’s admissions-boosting methods:

  • Work with a college essay coach
  • Strong essays increase your chance of admission by up to 10x
  • Don’t let influencers influence your college essays
  • Should I apply test-optional?
  • Early admissions: Everything you need to know
  • College Essay Help Center

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College Admissions , College Essays

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When talking about college essays, we tend to focus on the Common Application prompts , and it's true that many students will need to write a Common App essay. However, there are actually quite a few schools, including both public and private universities, that don't use the Common App and instead ask applicants to respond to their own college essay prompts.

Luckily, college essay prompts tend to be pretty similar to each other. In this guide, I'll list all the college essay questions for popular schools in the US (and a few abroad) and then break down the patterns to help you brainstorm topics and plan how to approach multiple essays efficiently. After reading this guide, you'll be able to strategize which essays you'll write for which colleges.

Feature image: Mayr /Flickr

Why Do Colleges Ask For an Essay?

The short answer: the essay gives admissions committees a sense of your personality beyond the statistics on the rest of your application. The essay is your chance to show the committee your unique perspective and impress them with your maturity and insight.

College application essay prompts are written with this goal in mind. Admissions officers want to give you the chance to share your interests, aspirations, and views on the world, so most prompts ask about how your experiences have shaped you or what you're excited about studying or doing in college. I've collected a ton of examples below and provided some analysis to help you begin planning and crafting your own essays.

Keep in mind that the personal statement alone won't be enough to get you in— your grades and test scores are still the most important factors in your application . That being said, a stellar essay can help bring a borderline applicant over the top or give an excellent but not extraordinary student the opportunity to stand out in a competitive applicant pool.

As such, the essay tends to matter most for very competitive schools. Non-competitive schools generally don't ask you to submit an essay.

Complete List of College Essay Prompts

This list collects the 2022 college essay prompts for major state universities, top-50 schools, and other popular schools which have their own unique questions. They're divided by region, with all optional essays listed at the end.

I left off the Common App supplements, as those often require a substantially different approach. I also stuck to four-year schools, meaning I didn't include special two-year programs, such as Deep Springs College or Miami Dade College's Honors Program (both of which require essays).

Finally, note that these prompts are for freshman applicants, so the requirements might be different for transfer students .

General Applications

There are three general applications you can use to apply to many different schools at once:

Common Application

Universal college application, coalition application.

Each application has its own personal statement requirement. Some schools will ask for additional supplemental essays.

Many more schools accept the Common App than they do the UCA or Coalition Application , though some will accept more than one of these applications.

For the Common App essay, you pick one of the prompts and write 250-650 words about it. Here are the prompts for the 2022-2023 school year:

Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?

Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.

Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?

Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

The UCA essay prompt is completely open ended and has a 650-word limit. Here is the 2022-2023 prompt:

Please write an essay that demonstrates your ability to develop and communicate your thoughts. Some ideas include: a person you admire; a life-changing experience; or your viewpoint on a particular current event.

For the Coalition Application, you'll pick one of five prompts listed below. While there is no hard word limit, the range guidelines are 500-650 words. Here are the prompts for 2022-2023:

What interests or excites you? How does it shape who you are now or who you might become in the future?

Describe a time when you had a positive impact on others. What were the challenges? What were the rewards?

Has there been a time when an idea or belief of yours was questioned? How did you respond? What did you learn?

What success have you achieved or obstacle have you faced? What advice would you give a sibling or friend going through a similar experience?

Now that you know the essay requirements for the three general applications, let’s look at the application essays for specific schools . To keep things organized, we’ve grouped schools based on the region of the US in which they’re located.

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic

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The Great Dome at MIT

Georgetown University

Georgetown asks applicants to write one short essay (about half a single-spaced page) and two longer essays (approximately one single-spaced page each). Each applicant must respond to the first two prompts and can choose among the other four based on the specific program she's interested in.

Short Essay: Briefly (approximately one-half page, single-spaced) discuss the significance to you of the school or summer activity in which you have been most involved.

All Applicants: As Georgetown is a diverse community, the Admissions Committee would like to know more about you in your own words. Please submit a brief essay, either personal or creative, which you feel best describes you.

Applicants to Georgetown College: What does it mean to you to be educated? How might Georgetown College help you achieve this aim? (Applicants to the Sciences and Mathematics or the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics should address their chosen course of study).

Applicants to the School of Nursing & Health Studies: Describe the factors that have influenced your interest in studying health care. Please specifically address your intended major (Global Health, Health Care Management & Policy, Human Science, or Nursing).

Applicants to the Walsh School of Foreign Service: The Walsh School of Foreign Service was founded more than a century ago to prepare generations of leaders to solve global problems. What is motivating you to dedicate your undergraduate studies to a future in service to the world?

Applicants to the McDonough School of Business: The McDonough School of Business is a national and global leader in providing graduates with essential ethical, analytical, financial and global perspectives. Please discuss your motivations for studying business at Georgetown.

For more Georgetown application tips, check out our articles on the Georgetown essays and how to get into Georgetown .

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT doesn't ask for a single personal statement but rather asks applicants to respond to a series of questions with just a paragraph or two of about 200 words each .

We know you lead a busy life, full of activities, many of which are required of you. Tell us about something you do simply for the pleasure of it.

Describe the world you come from (for example, your family, clubs, school, community, city, or town). How has that world shaped your dreams and aspirations?

MIT brings people with diverse backgrounds and experiences together to better the lives of others. Our students work to improve their communities in different ways, from tackling the world’s biggest challenges to being a good friend. Describe one way you have collaborated with people who are different from you to contribute to your community.

Tell us about a significant challenge you've faced (that you feel comfortable sharing) or something that didn't go according to plan. How did you manage the situation?

For more details on how to get into MIT , read our other articles on the MIT application process , tips for MIT essays , and an example of a real MIT acceptance letter !

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University of Wisconsin, Madison

Indiana University Bloomington

IU asks for 200-400 words on your plans and interests.

Describe your academic and career plans and any special interest (for example, undergraduate research, academic interests, leadership opportunities, etc.) that you are eager to pursue as an undergraduate at Indiana University. If you encountered any unusual circumstances, challenges, or obstacles in pursuit of your education, share those experiences and how you overcame them. Please note that this essay may be used in scholarship consideration.

University of Illinois

The University of Illinois asks for two essays (or three only if you selected a second-choice major other than what's noted on your application). All responses should be approximately 150 words.

You'll answer two to three prompts as part of your application. The questions you'll answer will depend on whether you're applying to a major or to our undeclared program, and if you've selected a second choice. Each response should be approximately 150 words. If You're Applying to a Major: 1.  Explain, in detail, an experience you've had in the past 3 to 4 years related to your first-choice major. This can be an experience from an extracurricular activity, in a class you’ve taken, or through something else. 2.  Describe your personal and/or career goals after graduating from UIUC and how your selected first-choice major will help you achieve them. If You're Applying to Our Undeclared Program in the Division of General Studies: 1.  What are your academic interests and strengths? You may also include any majors you are considering. 2.  What are your future academic or career goals? If You've Selected a Second-Choice Major (Including Undeclared): Please explain your interest in your second-choice major or your overall academic or career goals.

If you're applying to UIUC, check out our UIUC essay tips article as well!

University of Wisconsin–Madison

All applicants must complete two essays for UW–Madison. The essays should be 250-650 words in length and may be used for scholarship and campus program review.

If you apply through the Common Application, you’ll be asked to reply to one of the freshman Common Application essays in lieu of the first essay prompt below, but you’ll be required to respond to the second prompt below. 

If you apply through the UW System Application, the following two essays are required:

This part is all about you. Tell us about something you've done — academically or personally — and what you've learned from it. Was it a success or a challenge? Did it represent a turning point in your life? How did this particular moment in your life influence you, and how will it continue to influence you as you pursue your college education?

Tell us why you would like to attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major(s) you have selected. If you selected undecided please describe your areas of possible academic interest.

Want to write the perfect college application essay?   We can help.   Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will help you craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step. At the end, you'll have a unique essay to proudly submit to colleges.   Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now:

Kyle Field at Texas A&M ( Ed Schipul /Flickr)

The ApplyTexas application is used by all Texas public universities and some private colleges. There are four ApplyTexas essay prompts. Which ones you need to respond to will depend on where you're applying. UT Austin, for example, requires applicants to submit at least one essay responding to Topic A on the ApplyTexas application. .

While there's no set word limit, the online application will cut off each essay at 120 lines (~1000 words).

Topic A: Tell us your story. What unique opportunities or challenges have you experienced throughout your high school career that have shaped who you are today?

Topic B: Most students have an identity, an interest, or a talent that defines them in an essential way. Tell us about yourself.

Topic C: You've got a ticket in your hand – Where will you go? What will you do? What will happen when you get there?

Topic D: Please Note: The essay in this section is specific to certain college majors and is not required by all colleges/universities that accept the Apply Texas Application. If you are not applying for a major in Architecture, Art, Art History, Design, Studio Art, Visual Art Studies/Art Education , you are not required to write this essay.

Personal interaction with objects, images and spaces can be so powerful as to change the way one thinks about particular issues or topics. For your intended area of study (architecture, art history, design, studio art, visual art studies/art education), describe an experience where instruction in that area or your personal interaction with an object, image or space effected this type of change in your thinking. What did you do to act upon your new thinking and what have you done to prepare yourself for further study in this area?

We go into all the ApplyTexas prompts in detail here !

University of Georgia

For UGA, applicants must write two essays, one 200-300 words and one 250-650 words . Both essays are required for all applicants. The longer personal essay uses the Common Application prompts for 2023 ; the prompt for the shorter essay is as follows:

The c ollege admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application.

For a more detailed discussion of the UGA essays, read this article .

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The Campanile at UC Berkeley

University of California

Students applying to the UC system must respond to four out of eight short personal insight questions. The maximum word count for each response is 350 words.

  • Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time.
  • Every person has a creative side, and it can be expressed in many ways: problem solving, original and innovative thinking, and artistically, to name a few. Describe how you express your creative side.
  • What would you say is your greatest talent or skill? How have you developed and demonstrated that talent over time?
  • Describe how you have taken advantage of a significant educational opportunity or worked to overcome an educational barrier you have faced.
  • Describe the most significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement?
  • Think about an academic subject that inspires you. Describe how you have furthered this interest inside and/or outside of the classroom.
  • What have you done to make your school or your community a better place?
  • Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you stand out as a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California?

Learn more about the UC essays , the UC application , and how to choose which UC schools to apply to with our complete guides .

University of Oregon

Applicants to the University of Oregon are required to submit one essay of 650 words or fewer. You also have the option to write a second essay (maximum of 500 words), but it’s not required.

The essay prompts are as follows:

The UO is interested in learning more about you. Write an essay of 650 words or less that shares information that we cannot find elsewhere on your application. Any topic you choose is welcome. Some ideas you might consider include your future ambitions and goals, a special talent, extracurricular activity, or unusual interest that sets you apart from your peers, or a significant experience that influenced your life. If you are applying to the UO's Robert D. Clark Honors College, feel free to resubmit your honors college application essay.

Optional second essay: As you've looked into what it will be like to attend Oregon, you've hopefully learned what makes Ducks Ducks. No two are alike, though, so tell us what makes you you, and how that connects to our campus community. We are interested in your thoughts and experiences recognizing difference and supporting equity and inclusion, and choosing one of these two options will guide you in sharing those thoughts. You can learn more about equity and inclusion at Oregon by visiting the Equity and Inclusion website . Maximum statement length is 500 words. This statement is not required.

University of Washington

In addition to its specific prompts, the University of Washington gives specific advice about what its admissions officers consider to be good writing before the prompts:

"At the UW, we consider the college essay as our opportunity to see the person behind the transcripts and the numbers. Some of the best statements are written as personal stories. In general, concise, straightforward writing is best, and good essays are often 300-400 words in length.

Essay Prompt (Required): Tell a story from your life, describing an experience that either demonstrates your character or helped shape it. Maximum length: 650 words.

Short Response (Required): Our families and our communities often define us and our individual worlds. Community might refer to your cultural group, extended family, religious group, neighborhood or school, sports team or club, co-workers, etc. Describe the world you come from and how you, as a product of it, might add to the diversity of the UW. Maximum length: 300 words

You can also find more tips on the University of Washington essays in this blog article .

International

Generally speaking, international schools are less likely to ask for an essay, since admission tends to be heavily focused on grades and test results. However, a few popular international schools do ask for a personal statement as part of their application.

Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UK Schools)

UCAS is a general application for UK schools (similar to the Common App in the US). There's no specific prompt for the personal statement—instead, applicants are required to write an essay describing what they want to study, why they want to study it, and what they bring to the table. There is a 4,000-character/47-line limit.

University of British Columbia

UBC asks applicants to fill out a personal profile consisting of five to seven short-answer questions that vary depending on the program you're applying to. Answers should be 50-200 words.

Depending on which degree program you apply to, you’ll be asked to answer some or all of the following questions on the UBC application:

  • Tell us about who you are. How would your family, friends, and/or members of your community describe you? If possible, please include something about yourself that you are most proud of and why.
  • What is important to you? And why?
  • Family/community responsibilities
  • Creative or performing arts
  • Work/employment
  • Service to others
  • Tell us more about one or two activities listed above that are most important to you. Please explain the role you played and what you learned in the process. You will be asked for a reference who can speak to your response.
  • Additional information: You may wish to use the space below to provide UBC with more information on your academic history to date and/or your future academic plans. For example: How did you choose your courses in secondary school? Are there life circumstances that have affected your academic decisions to date? What have you done to prepare yourself specifically for your intended area of study at UBC?
  • Please submit the names of two referees who know you well and can comment on your preparedness for study at UBC. Examples of referees include an employer, a community member, a coach, a teacher/instructor, or anyone who knows you well. One of the referees you select must be able to speak to one of the activities/experiences described in one of your long-answer responses above. For applicants who are currently attending a high school, one of your referees must be a school official (e.g., Grade 12 or senior year counsellor, teacher, or IB coordinator). Neither referee should be a friend, family member, or paid agent.

Some programs of study may ask applicants to respond to the questions above and some additional, program-specific questions when completing the personal profile.

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University of Cambridge

Optional Essays

Some schools don't require an essay from all applicants but do recommend or require an essay for certain programs. I've listed a selection of those prompts below.

Arizona State University

Students applying to the Barrett Honors College at ASU must submit one essay of 300 to 500 words in response to one of the following prompts (your response may be critical or creative):

Prompt 1 Discuss how a specific piece of art (painting, literature, photograph, etc.) or popular culture (song, comic book, etc.) helped you realize something new about yourself or the world. What was that realization, and how did the piece of art or pop culture bring about this change in your thinking? Do not simply describe the piece of art or pop culture; instead, focus on its effect on you and how it makes you a good fit for the Barrett Honors College experience. Prompt 2 Tell us about a habit or way of thinking that others would recognize as “uniquely you.” This is something you value and would hesitate to give up because it is a distinct part of who you are or what makes you different - why is it so? Be sure to share how this aspect of your identity makes you a good fit for the Barrett Honors College experience.

City University of New York

Applicants to Macaulay Honors College must write two essays: an “about you” essay, and an essay describing your plans for college. Each response should be around 500 words, give or take a few within reason.

Essay 1: About you. (Select one of the options below.) Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. OR Tell us about an area or activity, outside of academics, in which you have invested a lot of time and effort. Tell us why. What did you learn? How was it meaningful?

Essay 2: About your plans for college. Please discuss all points below. Why do you want to go to an honors college ? There are many benefits of being a Macaulay student, such as the Macaulay community, special courses, Honors advisement, cultural passport, opportunities funds, and other financial benefits. Please describe how these features will shape you and your college experience, including, what you expect to bring to the college community and what you expect to get out of your college experience.

Florida International University

Only applicants who don't meet the criteria for automatic admissions and whose applications undergo holistic review will need to submit a 500-word essay:

Students requesting appeal or additional review of their admission status must submit a written statement including:

Your goals and educational or professional objectives

A summary/explanation of past academic performance

Information and/or circumstances that may have affected past academic performance

  • Any other information the student wishes to have considered

Ohio University

For the Ohio University application, students who've been out of school for more than a year must submit an essay explaining what they've done in their time off from school.

Applicants who have been out of high school for more than one year must submit an essay detailing activities since graduation.

Additionally, applicants to the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism are encouraged, though not required, to submit an essay detailing how they want to help shape the future of journalism.

For all other applicants, submitting an essay here is optional; however, if you do wish to write an essay, the application suggests that you describe any academic challenges you’ve faced, academic and career objectives, or involvement in community affairs (recommended length is 250-500 words).

Those interested in Ohio University's OHIO Honors Program (including the Cutler Scholars Program) are required to answer the following essay prompt (limit 250 words):

Students in the OHIO Honors Program represent all majors on campus and take engaging honors courses while applying what they learn outside of the classroom. Students choose from classes and experiences across three pathways: community engagement, research and creative activity, and leadership . Students in OHP can move among the three pathways as their interests evolve and they develop their goals. What pathway is most exciting to you right now, and why?

Finally, those interested in the Honors Tutorial College are must answer the following two essay prompts (in about 500 words each):

HTC Question 1: Please explain why you have chosen your particular program(s) of study.

HTC Question 2: We expect that one reason you seek a tutorial education is for the one-on-one interaction with faculty, but other than that, what interests you about pursuing a tutorial-based undergraduate education? What aspects of your education and life experience have prepared you for a tutorial education with its emphasis on research and creative activity?

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Type 1: Questions About a Meaningful Experience

This type of college essay question is the most common. The exact focus of these prompts can vary quite a bit, but they all ask you to reflect on an important experience. Some questions specify a type of experience whereas others don't, simply opting to have applicants write about whatever matters to them.

There are three basic sub-types that you'll see when dealing with these prompts. Let's look at an example of each.

#1: Overcoming a Challenge

These prompts ask about how you dealt with a particular challenge or solved a problem. Below is a typical example of this question type from the MIT application:

Tell us about the most significant challenge you've faced or something important that didn't go according to plan. How did you manage the situation?

To address a question like this, you need a topic that has real stakes —that is, something that you genuinely struggled with. Even though it can seem as though you should only discuss positive experiences and feelings in your college essay (you want to impress your readers with how awesome you are!), unwavering positivity actually hurts your essay because it makes you seem fake.

Instead, be honest : if you're writing about a negative experience, acknowledge that it was unpleasant or hard and explain why. Doing so will just make your overcoming it that much more impressive.

#2: Engaging With Diversity

Questions about diversity ask how you interact with those who are different from you . See an example below from the Common Application:

When approaching this type of question, you need to show that you're thoughtful about new ideas and perspectives. Colleges are full of students from all kinds of backgrounds, and admissions officers want to know that you'll be accepting of the diversity of other students, even if you don't necessarily agree with them.

Also, make sure to pick a specific instance to focus on. Writing a general essay about how you accept others won't impress admissions officers—you need to show them an example of a time that you did so.

#3: Growing Up

Finally, this type of prompt asks about a transitional experience or rite of passage that made you feel like an adult. I've reprinted another example from the Common App:

For these types of prompts, you want to show personal growth. Explain to the reader not just who you are but also how you've changed . (Really, this is a good idea no matter which prompt you're addressing!)

College can be challenging, so admissions officers want to know that you have the maturity to deal with (likely) living on your own, managing your own life, and planning for your future.

Regardless of the exact prompt, the key to this type of college essay is to show what you've learned from the experience. Admissions officers don't care that much about what happened to you—they care about what you think and feel about that event. That's what will give them a sense of who you are and what kind of college student you'll make.

body_graduation-2

Once you write a first draft, put it in a drawer for a week. Taking some time away from it will allow you to come back to it with fresh eyes. Then, try to read your essay from the perspective of someone who knows nothing about you. Would they be able to understand the story? Do you explain clearly what you learned? Does your intro grab the reader's attention?

It can also be helpful to ask someone you trust, such as a parent, teacher, or peer, to read your essay and give you feedback. Really listen to what they say and think about how you can improve your writing.

Finally, try reading your essay aloud. This will help you catch any weird or awkward phrasings.

What's Next?

If you're struggling with how to approach your personal statement, consider looking at some college essay examples .

The essay is just one part of the college application process. Check out our guide to applying to college for a step-by-step breakdown of what you'll need to do.

Finally, if you're planning to take the SAT or ACT , consider taking a look at our expert test-prep guides for some helpful advice on whatever you might be struggling with.

Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points or your ACT score by 4 points?   We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download them for free now:

Alex is an experienced tutor and writer. Over the past five years, she has worked with almost a hundred students and written about pop culture for a wide range of publications. She graduated with honors from University of Chicago, receiving a BA in English and Anthropology, and then went on to earn an MA at NYU in Cultural Reporting and Criticism. In high school, she was a National Merit Scholar, took 12 AP tests and scored 99 percentile scores on the SAT and ACT.

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University of Georgia 2023-24 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

Regular Decision Deadline: Jan 1

You Have: 

University of Georgia 2023-24 Application Essay Question Explanations 

The Requirements: 1 essays of 200-300 words

Supplemental Essay Type(s): Oddball

T he transition from middle to high school is a key time for students as they reach new levels of both academic and personal discovery. Please share a book (novel, non-fiction, etc.) that had a serious impact on you during this time. Please focus more on why this book made an impact on you and less on the plot/theme of the book itself (we are not looking for a book report).” (200-300 words)

This prompt asks you to discuss a book that made a big impression on you as you navigated the transition from middle to high school. At CEA, we always recommend that you choose an unexpected work in order to stand out from the pack, but ultimately, you should aim for authenticity rather than uniqueness. If Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone was the book you turned to in the beginning of freshman year, where you found not only fantastical escape, but also an accurate reflection of the struggles of fitting in (even if you weren’t the “chosen one”), then write about that! But a word of warning if you choose a more commonly read book such as those from the Wizarding World: your essay has to go above and beyond if it has any chance of making an impression on the admissions department at UGA. 

If, however, there is another less-mainstream book that struck a chord with you, we encourage you to select that one to elaborate upon. No matter your choice, as you contemplate the prompt, ask yourself: Which characters have inspired you? Which plotlines have stayed with you long after you closed the book? How did you apply what you took from the story to your own life?

Regardless of the book you choose, try to give yourself as much time as possible to reflect on its impact and the role it played in helping you navigate your introduction to high school. As always, it’s your job to tell admissions a story, one that reveals information about who you are, what you care about, and/or what inspires you.

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BSEd in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Explore human communication through speech, language, hearing, and their related disorders with a B.S.Ed. in Communication Sciences and Disorders. This undergraduate program provides an excellent foundation for students wishing to pursue the advanced degrees required to work as a speech-language pathologist, audiologist, or other private practitioner.

Admittance to this high-demand major is limited. Apply by the January before your junior year.

  • High-demand major, with applications due in January for the following Fall
  • Follows a cohort model, in which groups of students progress together
  • Most graduates continue on to master’s or doctoral studies

This undergraduate program teaches the foundations of human speech, language, hearing, and the disorders related to them. While some graduates go directly into the workforce, this program is best suited for those who want to pursue further studies to become certified or licensed as a speech-language pathologist, audiologist, or another professional practitioner.

Before applying to the major, you should work with your advisor to take prerequisite coursework in such areas as physics, linguistics, and statistics. If you are accepted to the major, you will take at least 36 hours of required courses that address

  • Anatomy, physiology, and neurology of speech, language, and hearing
  • Speech, voice, and hearing science
  • Children’s communication development
  • Diversity, differences, and disorders in speech, language, and hearing
  • Critical thinking; scientific thinking; and professional and clinical issues for speech-language pathology, audiology, and related fields

Students in this program must maintain an overall grade point average of 2.75. If the overall GPA drops below 2.75, the student will not be allowed to take further communication sciences and disorders courses until the GPA is raised to 2.75. A grade of C or better is required for all communication sciences and disorders major courses; any grade of C- or lower in a major course will prevent the student from registering for subsequent courses and will delay the student’s completion of the major. A grade of B or better is required in EDSE 2000/2000E.

  • Download Four-Year Plan (PDF)

In typical cohort years, the maximum number of students admitted to this program is 60-80. Many more students apply than the program can admit, so admission is highly competitive. Most applicants’ credentials greatly exceed the minimum eligibility criteria.

Prior to application, you should consult with the Office of Undergraduate Advising . They can advise you on how to arrange your program of study prior to application, so you are well-positioned for enrollment if accepted.

Minimum Eligibility Criteria

Please Note: Meeting the minimum eligibility criteria does not guarantee acceptance to the program.

  • Overall minimum GPA of 3.2 or higher (GPA of 3.7 preferred) at the end of the Fall semester (including Fall semester grades) prior to the year for which admittance is sought (typically the middle of the second year to begin the major in the Fall of the third year)
  • Completion of the following courses or their equivalents with a minimum grade of B or higher prior to application: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1101, and BIOL 1103/L
  • Completion of (1) Federal and Georgia Constitution and (2) U.S. and Georgia History University requirements by the end of the semester of application ( Note : You may only take the exemption exams for these subjects a certain number of times. Please consult with the UGA Testing Center to ensure your timeline works. )

How to Apply

Part 1: apply to uga.

If you are not a UGA student already, you must apply to the university. See the requirements and deadlines provided by the University of Georgia Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

Start UGA Application

Part 2: Apply to the B.S.Ed. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

You are ready to apply to the major when you have met the minimum eligibility requirements. If you are in the process of completing any required core coursework during the Spring semester, you may be provisionally accepted contingent upon satisfactory completion of the required courses while maintaining the required minimum 3.2 GPA for admission.

Fall Major Admissions Timeline

  • Application Opens – December 20th
  • Application Deadline – January 26th at 11:59 p.m.
  • Decisions Released – March 1st

Application Materials

To apply to the Communication Sciences and Disorders program, use the College’s Major application. In your application, you’ll submit the following materials:

  • Download Essay Prompts (PDF)
  • Additional items Please upload unofficial transcripts from all institutions attended as a PDF. You should adhere to the following file naming format: Last Name_First Name_Transcript (example: Smith_Jane_Transcript.pdf ).
  • B.S.Ed. Program Application FAQs

Apply to the Program

Selection Process

Applications are evaluated by a committee of faculty and staff in the communication sciences and disorders program. The rubric-based evaluation process examines all applicant materials, including your GPA, performance in the required prerequisite courses, and quality of essay responses. Candidates in the application pool are ranked according to rubric scores.

Simply meeting the minimum eligibility criteria does not guarantee acceptance to the program. Applicants who are not accepted may apply again in the following application cycle.

Admission decisions will be made by March 1. You will be notified via email of the admission decision by the program coordinator or other program contact.

Special Requirements Upon Admission

A grade of C or better is required for all communication sciences and disorders major courses. This requirement may preclude taking further courses in a prerequisite sequence.

Admission Contact

Jeannine Parry

Additional Resources

Please use our online form if you have any questions for the department. Please be as specific as possible so that we may quickly assist you.

The College’s programs are taught by dedicated faculty who are experts in a range of areas and are passionate about helping students succeed both in their programs and professionally.

Meet Faculty

All undergraduate students at UGA meet with an academic advisor each semester. This meeting is critical to student success and provides a chance to discuss courses and electives, certification criteria, and general graduation requirements.

Find Your Advisor

Almost all in-state students begin their studies at UGA paying limited tuition or fees. Please note that these amounts are subject to change and are meant to give prospective students an idea of the costs associated with a degree at the University of Georgia College of Education.

Students may qualify for a variety of assistantships, scholarships, and other financial awards to help offset the cost of tuition, housing, and other expenses.

Tuition Rates   Browse Financial Aid

Held primarily in the same building as the Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education and the UGA Speech and Hearing Clinic, our centralized classes provide plenty of opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to interact and work together.

You will take most of your classes with your fellow students as a cohort. By progressing through the program together, you will support and learn from each other and develop lasting relationships.

Extend your interest in speech and hearing by volunteering as a “reading buddy” to local schoolchildren, distributing earplugs and pamphlets at Athens’ famous music festivals, or joining the campus chapter of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association.

See for yourself how much UGA College of Education has to offer! Schedule a tour of campus to learn more about the UGA student experience.

Schedule A Visit

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uga application essay prompts

2023-2024 UGA MBA Essays: Tips for Terry College of Business

The C. Herman and Mary Virginia Terry College of Business - University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia.

Lucky for MBA applicants, UGA Terry College of Business tends to stick to the same prompts year-on-year, which means it’s never too early to get started! Most MBA programs will highly value the personal statement in your application. So don’t slack on it! Writing a unique essay that captures your individuality while responding to the prompt is a challenging task, but here at Menlo Coaching, we have a comprehensive guide to perfect it.

The University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business is looking for students with a well-rounded background and lots of experience that can be translated into a succinct and compelling statement. One of the essential tips for an impactful essay is asking yourself why you chose to highlight a particular experience for the Admissions Committee. Did it show significant professional development? Did it show how you overcame a personal struggle? Making sure your essay connects to the prompt, especially that it shows why you are pursuing an MBA, will make your essay stand out.

No matter what the essay prompt is, these tips are broadly applicable. The two types of essays you will see on Terry College of Business’s application are career goals and behavioral—although UGA also has an optional essay section. 

The Career Goals Essay

The career goals essay is the space to describe your post-MBA plans to the Admissions Committee. The University of Georgia MBA program wants to accept students who have concrete, achievable career plans and a roadmap to success.

MBA programs want a glowing post-grad report that proves they produce successful graduates with many job prospects (and who will donate money in the future)! The University of Georgia also wants students to promote their MBA program to friends, co-workers, and prospective applicants. Let’s have a look at their recent essay prompts.

The career goals essay combines your hard statistics (eg: GMAT score) with your interpersonal skills (eg: recommendations) to formulate the case for getting an MBA. Make sure to state your achievable short-term and long-term goals explicitly, explain why an MBA would help you achieve these goals, and detail how the University of Georgia MBA program essential to your plan. Also, research what fields the graduates of Terry College of Business enter, and emphasize your findings in the essay to show you’re genuinely interested. A recent career goals prompt for UGA was: How will the Georgia MBA help you achieve your short- and long-term career goals?

  • Career Goals How will the Georgia MBA help you achieve your short- and long-term career goals? (400 words or less)

The Behavioral Essay

The behavioral essay asks you to reflect on your professional leadership skills. This could mean recalling a time when you’ve led a team to success or recovered after a failure and what you learned.

Be honest with this essay, and don’t downplay the story; the Admissions Committee can tell if you’re being disingenuous. Showing growth is essential to a constructive essay and shows development that you can easily apply to on-campus activities.

Say what mistakes you made and how you remedied them; if there is a situation where you used the lessons you learned from the failures, be sure to include that. Having the bravery to express your failures shows the Admissions Committee that you are willing to admit your mistakes. Here’s a recent UGA Terry behavioral essay prompt: Tell us about a time you created a positive impact, either personally or professionally. Describe the impact. Why was it significant to you or others? OR Describe a time when you contributed to making a work environment or organization more welcoming, inclusive, and diverse.

For the UGA MBA essay, you will have a choice between the following two options:

Behavioral Essay Option A : Tell us about a time you created a positive impact, either personally or professionally. Describe the impact. Why was it significant to you or others? (250 words or less) Option B : Describe a time when you contributed to making a work environment or organization more welcoming, inclusive, and diverse. (250 words or less)

Optional Essays

The Terry MBA program also offers applicants the opportunity to submit an additional optional essay to supplement their application. While this is not a required essay, it is a useful space to explain, if necessary, your test scores, undergraduate GPA, non-traditional background, or anything else you have not had the opportunity to address within your application.

  • Please use this optional essay to share relevant information that isn’t revealed anywhere else in your application materials. The committee wants to understand you as a whole person, so use this essay to “fill any holes” in your application. (400 words or less)

Filling in the gaps of your MBA application can be a difficult task. It’s tough to discern whether an element of your application needs to be addressed.

If you feel there are any glaring faults in your MBA application, which you can justify, you should absolutely shed some light on this here. If you are addressing a low GPA or sub-standard test scores, it is important to prove that these results are not indicative of your future performance in your MBA program.

For example, if you have a below average GMAT score, you will want to make reference to your academic achievements elsewhere and point to a valid reason why your scores aren’t as high as your peers’.

Equally, if there is something that you believe will strengthen your application that you haven’t had the chance to write about, this is the place to include that information. Maybe you run a successful blog, you’ve spent a lot of time travelling internationally, or you are an accomplished musician.

Excellence in one area can often translate to excellence in another, so any accomplishments or achievements you’re proud of should certainly be mentioned here. Make sure that you use this essay to highlight the transferable skills you developed as a result of pursuing this accomplishment.

Early Birds Toolkit

Learn 3 Steps You Should Take NOW to Improve Your Profile for R1 2024

In MBA admissions, starting early can significantly boost your chances. 

But there are no shortcuts, and while R1 2024 deadlines might seem far off, building your profile takes time.

Our Early Birds Toolkit has everything you need to get started right now —leave your name and email, and we’ll send you three actionable steps to elevate your profile, plus time-saving tools for faster progress.

Optional Video Essay

Although this is entirely optional essay, some applicants might find that they have not had the opportunity to express their personality and enthusiasm for the Terry College in their MBA application. If you’re confident on camera, this is a great opportunity to make a positive, lasting impression on the AdCom.

Regarding the video essay, the University of Georgia MBA program had the following to say:

  • This is another way for you to show parts of yourself and your personality that are not seen elsewhere in your application. Details and prompts are available in the application.

Overall, honesty and growth are the most important parts of a successful MBA application essay. In addition, applying the lessons you learned shows improvement in your interpersonal and professional skills, making you a more attractive candidate for MBA admissions.

At Menlo Coaching, we are prepared to help you take the next step and perfect your essays—along with the rest of your application materials. Visit our process page to understand how Menlo Coaching can help you!

Related Articles

  • MBA Essay Tips From 3 Top Admissions Consultant
  • Taking the Stress out of the MBA Essay Writing Process
  • How to Get Into MBA Programs at Top Business Schools

Ultimate Guide to Writing Your College Essay

Tips for writing an effective college essay.

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uga application essay prompts

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uga application essay prompts

2024 – 2025 Common Application Personal Essay Prompts

uga application essay prompts

The personal essay is the main writing portion of a student’s application, and it is sent to each school a student applies to within the Common Application . While the Common App itself won’t be available for rising seniors until August 1st, 2024, students may begin working on their personal essays at any time. It is important to start working on this essay early. It is what gives an applicant the opportunity to express themselves, to offer context to the hard data points in the application, and to show off their writing skills.

The Common App confirmed that the 2024-2025 application cycle will use the same prompts as last year, reporting high satisfaction rates from students, counselors, teachers, and member colleges . The prompts are wide in scope, and there is something for everyone to write about.

2024-2025 Common Application Personal Essay Prompts

In 650 words or less, please respond to one of the following prompts:

  • Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  • The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?
  • Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?
  • Reflect on something that someone has done for you that has made you happy or thankful in a surprising way. How has this gratitude affected or motivated you?
  • Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.
  • Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?
  • Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

Students will also, once more, have an opportunity to explain how Covid-19 has impacted their lives, family, and learning environment.

Aristotle Circle is here to assist with your college applications. Our services include essay assistance provided by writing professionals and Ivy League graduates who can help you plan and execute an excellent personal essay.

Looking for more? Our College Admissions Counseling Package offers unlimited access to a NACAC – certified college counselor matched to your student’s interests and goals. Our team helps families with every step of the college admissions process, from selecting courses in high school all the way through wait list strategy.

Call 212-360-2301 or email us at [email protected] for more information.

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IMAGES

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VIDEO

  1. How to Write Fantastic Application Essays for the University of Georgia

  2. How to Answer the 2023-2024 UChicago Essay Prompts Explained by a University of Chicago Student

  3. Georgia Tech Supplemental Essays (THAT GET ACCEPTED!!)

  4. Guide to the 2024-25 Common App Essays: Writing about Your Background (Prompt 1)

  5. Guide to the 2024-25 Common App Essays: Writing about Personal Growth (Prompt 5)

  6. In-Depth How To Get Into UGA 2021

COMMENTS

  1. New Information for 2024 First Year Applicants

    For the Fall 2024 First-Year applicant group, there are three updates the UGA Admissions Office wants to make known when students are preparing to apply to UGA. ... UGA will keep the same longer personal essay (250-650 words) as before, using the essay prompts from the Common App. The shorter UGA specific essay (200-300 words suggested) ...

  2. 2023 Application Essays

    UGA will require two essays, a longer personal essay (250-650 words) and a shorter essay (200-300 words). In addition, the Fall 2023 application will open up on August 1 in order to align our opening with other institutions using the Common Application. The longer Personal essay will use the Common Application prompts for 2023. I have listed ...

  3. Fall 2022 Application and Essay Information

    For the Fall 2022 class, UGA will be keeping the same essay questions as have had for the past few years. UGA will require two essays, a longer personal essay (250-650 words) and a shorter essay (200-300 words). ... I have listed the Common Application prompts for the Personal Essay below for your knowledge. Some students have a background ...

  4. 4 Tips for Writing Stellar UGA Essays

    What Are the UGA Essay Prompts? The UGA application, which you can submit via the Common Application or the Coalition Application, requires all first-year applicants to submit two essays. The first essay is the personal essay that's part of the Common App or Coalition App.

  5. How to Write the University of Georgia Essay 2023-2024

    Although you are framing your development through the lens of a book, the real core of your essay is about the challenges you faced and how you handled them. As you start brainstorming your essay, there are two routes you can take. Pick a book first and tie it back to your life. Pick a challenge in your life and find a book that relates to it.

  6. 2020 Freshman Essay Questions

    These two essays should be between 200-300 words and remember to focus on substance and not word count. Before submitting your application and essays, always remember to proofread and edit! The First Year application will be available on September 1, but we thought that some people would want to know the essay prompts earlier than that date.

  7. University of Georgia Essay Example by an Accepted Student

    This is a great essay for the prompt! Don't assume that the admissions committee wants deep, personal stories with hard-earned lessons in every essay. They are people too, and they want to be engaged with amusing stories. This essay does a great job of being light, playful, and funny, while still revealing a lot about the student who wrote it.

  8. Information on the UGA 2021 Application

    The Freshman Application will open up on September 1. Essays. UGA will require two essays, a longer personal essay (250-650 words) and a shorter essay (200-300 words). The longer Personal essay will use the Common Application prompts or Coalition Application prompts for 2021. I have listed the Common Application prompts for the Personal Essay ...

  9. 2019 Freshman Essay Topics

    We require. one short essay that all applicants must complete, and four additional short. essay topics with the applicant selecting to respond to one of these. These two. essays should be between 200-300 words and remember to focus on substance and. not word count. Before submitting your application and essays, always.

  10. essays Archives

    Fall 2022 Application and Essay Information. David Graves July 1st, 2021. For the Fall 2022 class, UGA will be keeping the same essay questions as have had for the past few years. UGA will require two essays, a longer personal essay (250-650 words) and a shorter essay (200-300 words).

  11. University of Georgia's 2023-24 Essay Prompts

    Impactful Book Short Response. Required. 350 Words. The transition from middle to high school is a key time for students as they reach new levels of both academic and personal discovery. Please share a book (novel, non-fiction, etc.) that had a serious impact on you during this time. Please focus more on why this book made an impact on you and ...

  12. The Ultimate Guide to the University of Georgia's Supplemental Essays

    The college application process often comes with writing supplemental essays, and UGA is no exception. This blog post aims to guide you on how to best approach these UGA supplemental essays for the 2023-2024 admissions cycle. UGA Supplemental Essay Prompt #1. The college admissions process can create anxiety.

  13. Thoughts on UGA essay prompts for 2023?

    Also remember that CollegeVine offers both free peer essay reviews and paid reviews by expert college admissions advisors, if you get to a stage with your draft where you think getting a second set of eyes on it would be beneficial. Good luck with your application to UGA!

  14. UGA Supplemental Essay Prompts 2023-24

    Although it only has one (brand new) general essay prompt, UGA's supplemental section still affords applicants an opportunity to illustrate what makes them uniquely qualified for admission. Below is the University of Georgia's supplemental prompt for the 2023-24 admissions cycle along with our advice for composing an effective essay. 2023 ...

  15. University of Georgia 2019-20 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

    The Requirements: 2 essays of 200-300 words. Supplemental Essay Type (s): Oddball. The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application. (200-300 words) *Required.

  16. How to Ace the 2023/2024 UGA Supplemental Essays

    Prompt #1. "The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application (200-350 words)". Try not to roll your eyes at an essay prompt saying it hopes to de-stress the ...

  17. How to Write Outstanding U Georgia College Essays

    For the other UGA application essay, all applicants respond to the same prompt: ‍The college admissions process can create anxiety. In an attempt to make it less stressful, please tell us an interesting or amusing story about yourself from your high school years that you have not already shared in your application. (300 words max)

  18. UGA Application and Status Page

    Inquiries concerning this policy should be directed to the University's Equal Opportunity Office at (706) 542-7912. If you have a disability and need assistance to obtain this publication in an alternative format, please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (762) 400-8800. Click here to review the full application deadline page.

  19. College Essay Prompts: Complete List, Analysis, and Advice

    College application essay prompts are written with this goal in mind. Admissions officers want to give you the chance to share your interests, ... For UGA, applicants must write two essays, one 200-300 words and one 250-650 words. Both essays are required for all applicants.

  20. University of Georgia 2023-24 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

    University of Georgia 2023-24 Application Essay Question Explanations The Requirements: 1 essays of 200-300 words Supplemental Essay Type(s): Oddball T he transition from middle to high school is a key time for students as they reach new levels of both academic and personal discovery. Please share a book (novel, non-fiction, etc.) that had a serious impact on you during this time.

  21. BSEd in Elementary Education

    Download Essay Prompts (PDF) B.S.Ed. Program Application FAQs. Apply to the Program. Selection Process. Applications are evaluated by a committee consisting of program faculty members. The rubric-based evaluation process holistically examines applicant materials, including consideration of GPA, essay, résumé, and the minimum eligibility criteria.

  22. BSEd in Communication Sciences and Disorders

    Application Materials. To apply to the Communication Sciences and Disorders program, use the College's Major application. In your application, you'll submit the following materials: Essays. In the application, you will be asked to upload written responses to several questions. Artificial Intelligence tools may not be used when writing your ...

  23. 2023-2024 UGA MBA Essays: Tips for Terry College of Business

    2023-2024 UGA MBA Essays: Tips for Terry College of Business. Lucky for MBA applicants, UGA Terry College of Business tends to stick to the same prompts year-on-year, which means it's never too early to get started! Most MBA programs will highly value the personal statement in your application. So don't slack on it!

  24. Ultimate Guide to Writing Your College Essay

    Sample College Essay 2 with Feedback. This content is licensed by Khan Academy and is available for free at www.khanacademy.org. College essays are an important part of your college application and give you the chance to show colleges and universities your personality. This guide will give you tips on how to write an effective college essay.

  25. 2024

    The Common App confirmed that the 2024-2025 application cycle will use the same prompts as last year, reporting high satisfaction rates from students, counselors, teachers, and member colleges. The prompts are wide in scope, and there is something for everyone to write about. 2024-2025 Common Application Personal Essay Prompts