Linking Words – Full List, Examples & Worksheet

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| Candace Osmond

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Candace Osmond

Candace Osmond studied Advanced Writing & Editing Essentials at MHC. She’s been an International and USA TODAY Bestselling Author for over a decade. And she’s worked as an Editor for several mid-sized publications. Candace has a keen eye for content editing and a high degree of expertise in Fiction.

Worried that your essay lacks structure and coherence? Perhaps you should use linking words, transition words, or connectors to give it a boost.

Linking words join separate sentences to improve writing flow. You can also find them mid-sentence to connect clauses.

Read on as I show you the definition and types of linking words in English. I also list examples of linking words under every category, and I whipped up a helpful worksheet to test your skills.

What Are Linking Words?

Grammarist Article Graphic V4 77

Linking words, transition words, or connecting words in the English language help connect ideas and sentences when speaking or writing.

Linking words and phrases are connectors or transitional phrases. They are also part of formal language, so you’ll find them in academic writing, opinion writing, critical essays, dialectic essays , journalism, and business documents.

Some linking verbs link clauses within a sentence, such as although, in case, and whatever. That means you can find them in the middle of sentences from time to time. Others link two complete sentences, such as besides, as a result, and however.

List of Transition Words

Now that you know the meaning of transition words, let’s look at the usage of transition words in sentences and clauses. Don’t worry, I’ll break it all down for you!

Below, I’ve got a list of linking words and phrases to serve as alternative choices for connecting ideas in writing. Note that there are several types of transition words which we will discuss later.

Agreement/Addition/Similarity

Linking words may help the reader understand additional comments or ideas in a statement. They may also express agreement or similarities. These words are also called additive transition words, commonly found in expository essays and narrative essays.

  • In the first place
  • As a matter of fact
  • In like manner
  • In addition
  • Not only, but also
  • Coupled with
  • In the same way
  • In the same manner
  • First, second, third
  • Not to mention
  • In the light of
  • By the same token
  • Additionally
  • Correspondingly
  • Furthermore
  • Comparatively
  • At the same time
  • Together with
  • Identically

Here are some examples of additive linking words in a sentence.

  • The group found that a constructivist approach leads to higher test scores. Moreover, essay examinations show higher levels of learning.
  • The resort has tennis courts. Furthermore, it has an Olympic pool.

Negative Ideas

Some linking words come in pairs to join negative ideas.

  • Not, neither
  • Neither, nor

Here are sentence examples of linking words showing negative ideas.

  • I haven’t seen Lory, neither have I talked to her friend.
  • I neither drink nor smoke.

Opposition/Limitation/Contradiction

Whereas some linking words show an extra idea, these transition phrases and words express contrasting ideas in writing.

  • Although this may be true
  • In contrast
  • (and) still
  • Notwithstanding
  • Different from
  • Of course…, but
  • On the other hand
  • On the contrary
  • Be that as it may
  • Nonetheless
  • Even so/though
  • Nevertheless
  • In spite of

Here are some sentences with linking words of opposition.

  • The short story can be analyzed using a functionalist lens. However, its historical theme is better understood with a critical perspective.
  • As much as I want to go, I must take care of my sister.

Some linking words show relationships between ideas by accepting an idea with reservation instead of showing complete opposition. Here are some examples.

  • All the same
  • Regardless of this
  • Up to a point

Here are some sentence examples.

  • Many citizens opposed this unfair policy, which the president nevertheless enacted.
  • I like him even if we have different views in life.

Cause/Condition/Purpose

You may also use linking words in your writing piece to show conditions and purpose for a logical flow of ideas. Words like reason get the reader ready to understand why. These words are commonly found in hypothesis essays.

  • In the event that
  • Granted (that)
  • Provided that
  • On (the) condition (that)
  • For the purpose of
  • With this intention
  • With this in mind
  • In the hope that
  • Inasmuch as
  • To the end that
  • For fear that
  • In order to
  • Seeing/being that
  • The researchers used this method so that the results would be valid, reliable, and aligned with the objectives.
  • I will not be attending the seminar due to a high fever.

Examples/Support/Emphasis

You can also use transition words in your piece of writing that show examples or support of an idea.

  • In other words
  • To put it differently
  • For one thing
  • In particular
  • As an illustration
  • In this case
  • For example
  • For instance
  • For this reason
  • To put it another way
  • To demonstrate
  • That is to say
  • With attention to
  • By all means
  • To emphasize
  • To enumerate
  • Particularly
  • Significantly
  • Specifically
  • Surprisingly
  • Important to realize
  • Another key point
  • On the negative side
  • First thing to remember
  • Must be remembered
  • To point out
  • Point often overlooked
  • She visited several cities, namely Portland, Jacksonville, Charleston, and Hartford.
  • Transition words improve writing flow. For instance, we use further to add extra ideas related to the previous statement.

Effect/Consequence/Result

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You might also spot transitional devices for essays that show consequences, results, and effects.

  • As a result
  • In that case
  • Under those circumstances
  • Accordingly
  • Consequently

Consider the examples below.

  • We watered the plant for seven days. In effect, it grew three inches taller.
  • Because she didn’t study for the test, Anna failed and had to retake it.

Conclusion/Summary/Restatement

These words and phrases show transitions between sentences to show conclusions. You’ll find these words in essay conclusions of different essay types.

  • In simple language
  • In explanation
  • In lay terms
  • In a nutshell
  • As can be seen
  • In simple terms
  • Generally speaking
  • All things considered
  • As shown above
  • In the final analysis
  • In the long run
  • In either case
  • Given these points
  • As has been noted
  • In any event
  • On the whole
  • By and large
  • For the most part
  • In conclusion
  • To summarize

Note that in lay terms and in explanation are formal alternative choices to “ in a nutshell.”

Here are some examples.

  • Matter is a material that occupies space and has mass. In simple language, it is any physical substance.
  • I don’t want to climb the corporate ladder. After all, money isn’t everything.

Time/Chronology/Sequence

Linking words’ other role in writing is to show sequence or chronology. Under the time category, these phrases add a meaning of time. You can find these words in an essay introduction when the writer explains how the paper is structured.

  • In due time
  • From time to time
  • At the present time
  • Sooner or later
  • Up to the present time
  • To begin with
  • Straightaway
  • In the meantime
  • In a moment
  • Without delay
  • All of a sudden
  • At this instant
  • First, second
  • By the time
  • Immediately
  • Occasionally
  • I watched the movie on television. Eventually, I fell asleep.
  • First, fill the pan with water. Then, bring it to a boil.

Space/Location/Place

The following transition words are famous adverbial expressions that limit or modify space. Some of these words and phrases are also transition words of time.

  • In the middle of
  • To the left/right
  • In front of
  • On this side
  • In the distance
  • In the foreground
  • In the background
  • In the center of
  • Adjacent to
  • Opposite to

Below are sentence examples using transition words of space.

  • My house is located behind the building.
  • To the left of the supermarket is a flower shop.

Common Mistakes With Transition Words

Transition words help you create a flow of arguments for readers to understand what you’re saying. But misused transition words and phrases will make your writing unclear. Avoid these mistakes to give your readers a better experience.

Starting a Sentence With So, And, and Also

Both so and and are coordinating conjunctions, which means they can start independent clauses that stand on their own. But it’s not recommended to use these words and also as sentence starters in formal writing. For example:

  • Incorrect: Also, there are unauthorized charges on my credit card account.
  • Correct: Furthermore, there are unauthorized charges on my credit card account.

Combination of Transition Words And/Or

When writing an essay, avoid English transition words and/or because it makes your paper look messy. Instead, consider whether you need both connectors or only one of them. If you need them both, try this alternative.

  • Incorrect: boat and/or plane.
  • Correct: boat, plane, or both.

Using As Well As as Alternative to And

As well as has a different meaning from the transition word and. And means you’re listing something of equal importance. Meanwhile, as well as is for additional, less essential information. Here’s an example.

  • Incorrect: In this paper, I discuss my movie analysis as well as provide recommendations for improvement.
  • Correct: In this paper, I discuss my movie analysis and provide recommendations for improvement.

Archaic Words

Your writing may not make any sense to readers if you overuse archaic transition words like therewith .

For example, hereby means as a result. We can replace it with more modern and explicit phrasing expressing how the current statement is connected to the previous statement.

Linking Words Summary

A linking word is a term that connects different ideas in your text, whether they are contrasting, supporting, or adding. They can improve your writing and help it flow better, I promise!

Regardless of the style of writing, every piece of writing contains linking words to show perfect transitions. I hope my guide on the definition and list of transitions helps you use these words and phrases correctly. Memorize each category, and don’t overuse them in essays.

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Linking/transition words: Things you need to know...

All assignments are written in formal language.   You need to ensure that you demonstrate your knowledge and understanding alongside your ability to answer the question/solve the problem. 

Below are some ideas to help you to develop your structure and flow.

  • Linking / transition words and phrases join ideas, sentences and paragraphs together. They should be used within sentences and to move from one idea to another (between sentences).   

These words and phrases indicate the direction, order and flow of ideas. Significantly, they strengthen the quality and structure of your work.

  • Redundant Words - less is more.  P articularly when trying to reduce the word count, it is important to look for phrases which can be replaced with a single word.

Linking/Transition Words

Transitions link one main idea to another separated by a semi-colon or full-stop.  When the transition word is at the beginning of the sentence, it should be followed by a comma:

Among other functions, they can signal cause and effect or sequencing (see examples in the table below).

Linking words: conjunctions

Linking words within a sentence  are referred to as coordinating conjunctions.  Do not worry about the term: think about the function.

Conciseness / redundant words

Microsoft Word now has an additional feature within the Edito r - it is called conciseness or wordiness.  

  • If you cannot see the Editor menu a quick tip is to hold down the function (fn key at the bottom left of the keyboard) + F7 (top line of keys).
  • From the Refinements section - select Conciseness - if there are any suggestions a number will appear in the box alongside this option
  • A dotted line will appear under any groups of groups
  • Either select the identified text by clicking with your right mouse button OR click on the down down next to the Conciseness menu.
  • MS Word will display any alternative words which you can either select and they will be replaced in your text or reject if you want to keep the original phrases.

Examples:  try to replace phrases with a single words which mean the same.

Need to know more...

  • Related pages
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  • Academic writing Illustrates the main features of academic writing so that you are aware of what it is and what it involves
  • Critical Thinking Academic work involves thinking, not just accepting what you read or are told.
  • Terms and Definitions Important words appear in your assignments and examinations. The aim of this factsheet is to help you to fully understand what they mean.

Additional resources to help you to improve your confidence and grades:-

  • Writing Effectively  demonstrates the importance of: clarity, structure, relevance, argument and precision.
  • Writing Mechanics  gives further examples and resources on areas including: sentence structure, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Linking/Transition words - Scribbr  https://www.scribbr.co.uk/syntax/transition-words-examples/ [Accessed 10 February 2023]

There are many books concerning academic writing, look around Dewey number  808

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Transition Sentences | Tips & Examples for Clear Writing

Published on June 9, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections.

… In this case, the researchers concluded that the method was unreliable.

However , evidence from a more recent study points to a different conclusion . …

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Table of contents

Transitioning between paragraphs, transitioning to a new section, transitions within a paragraph, other interesting articles.

When you start a new paragraph , the first sentence should clearly express:

  • What this paragraph will discuss
  • How it relates to the previous paragraph

The examples below show some examples of transition sentences between paragraphs and what they express.

Placement of transition sentences

The beginning of a new paragraph is generally the right place for a transition sentence. Each paragraph should focus on one topic, so avoid spending time at the end of a paragraph explaining the theme of the next one.

The first dissenter to consider is …

However, several scholars dissent from this consensus. The first one to consider is …

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While transitions between paragraphs are generally a single sentence, when you start a new section in a longer text, you may need an entire transition paragraph. Transitioning to a new section involves summarizing the content of the previous section and expressing how the new one will build upon or depart from it.

For example, the following sentences might be an effective transition for a new section in a literary analysis essay.

Having established that the subjective experience of time is one of Mann’s key concerns in The Magic Mountain , it is now possible to explore how this theme facilitates the novel’s connection with World War I. The war itself is not narrated in the book, but rather hinted at as something awaiting Castorp beyond the final pages. In this way, Mann links his protagonist’s subjective experience of time to more than just his illness; it is also used to explore the period leading up to the outbreak of war.

As in academic writing generally, aim to be as concise as you can while maintaining clarity: If you can transition to a new section clearly with a single sentence, do so, but use more when necessary.

It’s also important to use effective transitions within each paragraph you write, leading the reader through your arguments efficiently and avoiding ambiguity.

The known-new contract

The order of information within each of your sentences is important to the cohesion of your text. The known-new contract , a useful writing concept, states that a new sentence should generally begin with some reference to information from the previous sentence, and then go on to connect it to new information.

In the following example, the second sentence doesn’t follow very clearly from the first. The connection only becomes clear when we reach the end.

By reordering the information in the second sentence so that it begins with a reference to the first, we can help the reader follow our argument more smoothly.

Note that the known-new contract is just a general guideline. Not every sentence needs to be structured this way, but it’s a useful technique if you’re struggling to make your sentences cohere.

Transition words and phrases

Using appropriate transition words helps show your reader connections within and between sentences. Transition words and phrases come in four main types:

  • Additive transitions, which introduce new information or examples
  • Adversative transitions, which signal a contrast or departure from the previous text
  • Causal transitions, which are used to describe cause and effect
  • Sequential transitions, which indicate a sequence

The table below gives a few examples for each type:

Grouping similar information

While transition words and phrases are essential, and every essay will contain at least some of them, it’s also important to avoid overusing them. One way to do this is by grouping similar information together so that fewer transitions are needed.

For example, the following text uses three transition words and jumps back and forth between ideas. This makes it repetitive and difficult to follow.

Rewriting it to group similar information allows us to use just one transition, making the text more concise and readable.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

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Transitional Words and Phrases

One of your primary goals as a writer is to present ideas in a clear and understandable way. To help readers move through your complex ideas, you want to be intentional about how you structure your paper as a whole as well as how you form the individual paragraphs that comprise it. In order to think through the challenges of presenting your ideas articulately, logically, and in ways that seem natural to your readers, check out some of these resources: Developing a Thesis Statement , Paragraphing , and Developing Strategic Transitions: Writing that Establishes Relationships and Connections Between Ideas.

While clear writing is mostly achieved through the deliberate sequencing of your ideas across your entire paper, you can guide readers through the connections you’re making by using transitional words in individual sentences. Transitional words and phrases can create powerful links between your ideas and can help your reader understand your paper’s logic.

In what follows, we’ve included a list of frequently used transitional words and phrases that can help you establish how your various ideas relate to each other. We’ve divided these words and phrases into categories based on the common kinds of relationships writers establish between ideas.

Two recommendations: Use these transitions strategically by making sure that the word or phrase you’re choosing matches the logic of the relationship you’re emphasizing or the connection you’re making. All of these words and phrases have different meanings, nuances, and connotations, so before using a particular transitional word in your paper, be sure you understand its meaning and usage completely, and be sure that it’s the right match for your paper’s logic. Use these transitional words and phrases sparingly because if you use too many of them, your readers might feel like you are overexplaining connections that are already clear.

Categories of Transition Words and Phrases

Causation Chronology Combinations Contrast Example

Importance Location Similarity Clarification Concession

Conclusion Intensification Purpose Summary

Transitions to help establish some of the most common kinds of relationships

Causation– Connecting instigator(s) to consequence(s).

accordingly as a result and so because

consequently for that reason hence on account of

since therefore thus

Chronology– Connecting what issues in regard to when they occur.

after afterwards always at length during earlier following immediately in the meantime

later never next now once simultaneously so far sometimes

soon subsequently then this time until now when whenever while

Combinations Lists– Connecting numerous events. Part/Whole– Connecting numerous elements that make up something bigger.

additionally again also and, or, not as a result besides even more

finally first, firstly further furthermore in addition in the first place in the second place

last, lastly moreover next second, secondly, etc. too

Contrast– Connecting two things by focusing on their differences.

after all although and yet at the same time but

despite however in contrast nevertheless nonetheless notwithstanding

on the contrary on the other hand otherwise though yet

Example– Connecting a general idea to a particular instance of this idea.

as an illustration e.g., (from a Latin abbreviation for “for example”)

for example for instance specifically that is

to demonstrate to illustrate

Importance– Connecting what is critical to what is more inconsequential.

chiefly critically

foundationally most importantly

of less importance primarily

Location– Connecting elements according to where they are placed in relationship to each other.

above adjacent to below beyond

centrally here nearby neighboring on

opposite to peripherally there wherever

Similarity– Connecting to things by suggesting that they are in some way alike.

by the same token in like manner

in similar fashion here in the same way

likewise wherever

Other kinds of transitional words and phrases Clarification

i.e., (from a Latin abbreviation for “that is”) in other words

that is that is to say to clarify to explain

to put it another way to rephrase it

granted it is true

naturally of course

finally lastly

in conclusion in the end

to conclude

Intensification

in fact indeed no

of course surely to repeat

undoubtedly without doubt yes

for this purpose in order that

so that to that end

to this end

in brief in sum

in summary in short

to sum up to summarize

linking words to end an essay

Improving Your Writing Style

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Clear, Concise Sentences

Use the active voice

Put the action in the verb

Tidy up wordy phrases

Reduce wordy verbs

Reduce prepositional phrases

Reduce expletive constructions

Avoid using vague nouns

Avoid unneccessarily inflated words

Avoid noun strings

Connecting Ideas Through Transitions

Using Transitional Words and Phrases

One of the most common questions we receive at the Writing Center is “what am I supposed to do in my conclusion?” This is a difficult question to answer because there’s no one right answer to what belongs in a conclusion. How you conclude your paper will depend on where you started—and where you traveled. It will also depend on the conventions and expectations of the discipline in which you are writing. For example, while the conclusion to a STEM paper could focus on questions for further study, the conclusion of a literature paper could include a quotation from your central text that can now be understood differently in light of what has been discussed in the paper. You should consult your instructor about expectations for conclusions in a particular discipline.

With that in mind, here are some general guidelines you might find helpful to use as you think about your conclusion.  

Begin with the “what”  

In a short paper—even a research paper—you don’t need to provide an exhaustive summary as part of your conclusion. But you do need to make some kind of transition between your final body paragraph and your concluding paragraph. This may come in the form of a few sentences of summary. Or it may come in the form of a sentence that brings your readers back to your thesis or main idea and reminds your readers where you began and how far you have traveled.

So, for example, in a paper about the relationship between ADHD and rejection sensitivity, Vanessa Roser begins by introducing readers to the fact that researchers have studied the relationship between the two conditions and then provides her explanation of that relationship. Here’s her thesis: “While socialization may indeed be an important factor in RS, I argue that individuals with ADHD may also possess a neurological predisposition to RS that is exacerbated by the differing executive and emotional regulation characteristic of ADHD.”

In her final paragraph, Roser reminds us of where she started by echoing her thesis: “This literature demonstrates that, as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Highlight the “so what”  

At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what’s at stake—why they should care about the argument you’re making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or broader context.

In the conclusion to her paper about ADHD and RS, Roser echoes the stakes she established in her introduction—that research into connections between ADHD and RS has led to contradictory results, raising questions about the “behavioral mediation hypothesis.”

She writes, “as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Leave your readers with the “now what”  

After the “what” and the “so what,” you should leave your reader with some final thoughts. If you have written a strong introduction, your readers will know why you have been arguing what you have been arguing—and why they should care. And if you’ve made a good case for your thesis, then your readers should be in a position to see things in a new way, understand new questions, or be ready for something that they weren’t ready for before they read your paper.

In her conclusion, Roser offers two “now what” statements. First, she explains that it is important to recognize that the flawed behavioral mediation hypothesis “seems to place a degree of fault on the individual. It implies that individuals with ADHD must have elicited such frequent or intense rejection by virtue of their inadequate social skills, erasing the possibility that they may simply possess a natural sensitivity to emotion.” She then highlights the broader implications for treatment of people with ADHD, noting that recognizing the actual connection between rejection sensitivity and ADHD “has profound implications for understanding how individuals with ADHD might best be treated in educational settings, by counselors, family, peers, or even society as a whole.”

To find your own “now what” for your essay’s conclusion, try asking yourself these questions:

  • What can my readers now understand, see in a new light, or grapple with that they would not have understood in the same way before reading my paper? Are we a step closer to understanding a larger phenomenon or to understanding why what was at stake is so important?  
  • What questions can I now raise that would not have made sense at the beginning of my paper? Questions for further research? Other ways that this topic could be approached?  
  • Are there other applications for my research? Could my questions be asked about different data in a different context? Could I use my methods to answer a different question?  
  • What action should be taken in light of this argument? What action do I predict will be taken or could lead to a solution?  
  • What larger context might my argument be a part of?  

What to avoid in your conclusion  

  • a complete restatement of all that you have said in your paper.  
  • a substantial counterargument that you do not have space to refute; you should introduce counterarguments before your conclusion.  
  • an apology for what you have not said. If you need to explain the scope of your paper, you should do this sooner—but don’t apologize for what you have not discussed in your paper.  
  • fake transitions like “in conclusion” that are followed by sentences that aren’t actually conclusions. (“In conclusion, I have now demonstrated that my thesis is correct.”)
  • picture_as_pdf Conclusions

Improving Your English

Conclusion transition words: Phrases for summarizing and ending

linking words to end an essay

Transition words help us structure our thoughts and guide the reader or listener through what we are saying. When it’s time to summarize your message or end a paragraph, conclusion transition words let you signal this closing.

It’s good to know some synonyms for ‘in conclusion’ and ‘to conclude’, because although these are good examples of concluding words, they can get repetitive.

Our comprehensive list of transition words for conclusion and summary should give you all the inspiration you need, whether you are writing an essay or speech, or just want to become more confident forming an argument. These signal words can also be helpful for restating ideas, drawing attention to key points as you conclude.

We have included plenty of examples of how you can use these transition words for concluding paragraphs or sentences, so by the end of this article, you should be clear on how to use them properly.

linking words to end an essay

Conclusion transition words with examples

We have grouped these summarizing and concluding transition words according to how and where they can be used. For example, some should only be used when forming a final conclusion, whereas others can be used to summarize sections mid-way through your speech or writing.

First, let’s be clear about the difference between a summary and a conclusion .

Summary vs conclusion

A conclusion comes at the end of a speech, chapter, or piece of text, and it brings together all of the points mentioned. A summary, however, can be placed anywhere (even at the beginning). A summary gives a brief outline of the main points but is not as in-depth as a conclusion.

If you are giving a presentation or writing a blog, you may wish to summarize the main points in your introduction so that people know what you are going to cover. You could also summarize a section part-way through before moving on to another angle or topic.

In contrast, the conclusion always comes at the end, and you should only use specific conclusion transition words as you are drawing to a close.

Transition words for conclusion paragraphs

Let’s begin with some discourse markers that signal you are moving to the concluding paragraph in your presentation, speech, essay, or paper. These can all be used to start a conclusion paragraph.

  • In conclusion
  • To conclude
  • We can conclude that
  • Given these points
  • In the final analysis
  • As can be seen
  • In the long run
  • When all is said and done
  • I’ll end by
  • As we draw to a close

The last three on this list, the ‘closing’ transition words, would generally only be used in spoken discourse.

Some transition words for order and sequencing should also help with structuring what you want to say, including the ending.

Example conclusion sentences

The following sentences show how to use conclusion words correctly:

  • In conclusion , we can say that plan A will be of greater benefit to the company.
  • When all is said and done , it’s clear that we should steer clear of this investment strategy.
  • Given these points , I believe the trial was a great success.
  • I’ll end by reminding you all that this experiment was just the beginning of a much larger project.
  • To wrap up , let’s look at how this learning can be applied.
  • In the long run , we will make more profit by investing heavily in new machinery.
  • Having analyzed seven of our competitors in detail, we can conclude that our content marketing strategy should be updated.

Transition words for summary

The following summary transition words may be used as part of a conclusion paragraph, but they are especially helpful for concisely drawing together several points.

  • To summarize
  • On the whole
  • Generally speaking
  • All things considered
  • In a nutshell (informal)
  • In any case

Note that although you can insert summary transition words anywhere, the specific phrases ‘In summary’, ‘To summarize’ and ‘To sum up’ are generally only used at the end, similar to conclusion phrases.

Example summary sentences

  • In brief , this presentation is going to cover the pros and cons of the device and how we can apply this to our own product development.
  • This new technology is, in a word , revolutionary.
  • All things considered , we found that Berlin was a great city for a weekend break.
  • To summarize , we can say that Shakespeare’s writing continues to have a global influence.
  • We can say that the combustion engine was, on the whole , a good invention.
  • In any case , we should put the necessary precautions in place.
  • Generally speaking , girls are more thoughtful than boys.

Transition words to end a paragraph

You may wish to add ending transition words in the final sentence of a paragraph to conclude the ideas in that section of text, before moving on to another point.

Here are some transition words to conclude a paragraph:

  • This means that
  • With this in mind
  • By and large
  • For the most part

Note that some of these could equally be used to begin a new paragraph, so long as that paragraph is summarizing the points previously mentioned.

Cause and effect transition words could also be helpful in this context.

Examples of transition words for the end of a paragraph

  • Jamie is a vegan and Sheryl has a lot of allergies. This means that we should be careful which restaurant we choose.
  • The weather forecast said it would rain this afternoon. With this in mind , should we postpone our hike?
  • Each of the students has their own opinion about where to go for the field trip. Ultimately , though, it’s the teacher who will decide.

Restating points as you conclude

Conclusion transition words can also signal that you are restating a point you mentioned earlier. This is common practice in both writing and speaking as it draws the reader or listener’s attention back to something you want them to keep in mind. These are, therefore, also examples of transition words for emphasizing a point .

Here are some helpful transition words for concluding or summarizing by restating points:

  • As mentioned previously
  • As stated earlier
  • As has been noted
  • As shown above
  • As I have said
  • As I have mentioned
  • As we have seen
  • As has been demonstrated

You may switch most of these between the passive and active voice, depending on which is most appropriate. For example, ‘As has been demonstrated’ could become ‘As I have demonstrated’ and ‘As shown above’ could become ‘As I have shown’.

Example sentences to restate a point in conclusion or summary

  • As I stated earlier , the only way we can get meaningful results from this survey is by including at least a thousand people.
  • As has been demonstrated throughout this conference, there are exciting things happening in the world of neuroscience.
  • As shown by this study, the trials have been promising.

If you were researching these transition words for concluding an essay, you might find it helpful to read this guide to strong essay conclusions . Of course, there are many ways to use summary transition words beyond essays. They may be a little formal for casual conversation, but they certainly can be used in speech as part of a presentation, debate, or argument.

Can you think of any other concluding words or phrases that should be on this list? Leave a comment below to share them!

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Linking Words To Use In An Essay

linking words to end an essay

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Concerned that your essay isn’t logical or has enough structure? You can include linking words, or transition words to make it stronger.

An essay is a crucial type of academic paper. It needs to have a clear flow so that the readability is perfect. Precisely stated, the sentences you create should naturally flow into one another. However, using linking words helps ensure that the sentences in your essay make sense. The words serve as the perfect linkers and overpasses to break up sentence segmentation. Additionally, these words can be used to present a conclusion, provide details, summarise, highlight a point, arrange material, compare and contrast ideas, and give illustrations. You might not be aware of these words and how to use them in your essay writing. Don’t worry. We are here to help you! This blog of All Assignment Help will let you know all about linking words and how you can use them in your essay writing to make it more effective and readable.

What are Linking Words?

Linking words are those words that showcase a connection between sentences. They help in forming the uniformity in the essay. Often referred to as transition words, these words serve to establish a connection between paragraphs or other essay sections. Linking words serves as a means of connecting the ideas or thoughts expressed in essays.

Moreover, the use of linking words makes your writing look more logical. Thus, you should use proper linking words to reduce the reading efforts of the readers. Your essay shouldn’t cause readers mental strain to understand it. Therefore, it is essential to make things simple for them.

Essays commonly use linking words in the following places:

  • The beginning of a paragraph
  • Beginning of a statement that expands on an argument or presents something new
  • At the start of a concluding statement

However, you need to use the right to link it from one another sentences or paragraphs. For example, when you are writing an argumentative essay , you need to make sure the flow of linking words is correct and logical so that the argument you are presenting sounds accurate.

Read Here: Words You May Find Confusing

The Reasons Behind Using Linking Words in Essays

Essay sentences that link is a crucial component of academic writing. To put it another way, you cannot write a paper without using them. Otherwise, readers will not understand what you have written. Linking words in the essay are used to:

  • Link concepts in your writing
  • Organize your ideas and arguments so that readers can follow along and grasp what you are trying to communicate.
  • Lead readers from one concept to the next while highlighting their connections.
  • Draw readers in and encourage them to continue reading the following sentence or paragraph
  • Provide more details
  • Strengthen or disprove an argument
  • Show the outcome, draw a conclusion, and illustrate how this or that point is affected

Every phrase and paragraph in an essay must lead the reader to the next one using essay maker and connecting words. The purpose of these transitional words is to help readers move from one idea or point to the next.

Three Main Types of Linking Words

There are three main types of linking words i.e. coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions, and correlative conjunctions. Let’s discuss these three more briefly.

Coordinating Conjunctions

Coordinating conjunctions are utilized to join two or more equally important items. Another name for them is FANBOYS, which is a shorthand for For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, and So.

For example, she is putting a lot of effort into her studies to gain admission to a reputable university.

Subordinating Conjunctions

A subordinate clause is joined to a main clause by a subordinating conjunction. However, the supporting clause cannot stand alone as a sentence and is of lesser significance than the main clause.

For example, she stayed home from work because she felt sick.

Correlative Conjunctions

Correlative conjunctions are utilized in pairs to connect two things of equal value. They are used to illustrate the connection between two concepts.

For example, not only did she finish her work, but she also helped her colleagues.

You can learn about the types of linking words by taking an online course. You can also hire someone to take your online class for you to get professional assistance which will help you in acing your online course with great credits.

Useful Linking Words for Essay Writing

It is not an easy task to compose a compelling essay. If you want to make your essay more appealing and expressive, focus on research, presentation, and persuasion. However, if you don’t have a knack for writing, then you will fail miserably in forming a logical essay with judicial use of linking words.

There are various categories of linking words one can use while writing an essay. Here, you will share the main categories and word lists to be used while framing an essay.

linking words

Linking Words List for Agreement/Addition/Similarity

Using linking words can help the reader understand further remarks or concepts in a statement. They might also convey agreement or similarities. These words are also known as additive transition words, which are often utilized in narrative and explanatory essay writings. The words used to link in such context are:

  • In the first place
  • As a matter of fact
  • In like manner
  • In addition
  • Not only, but also
  • In the same manner
  • First, second, third
  • Not to mention
  • In the light of
  • Furthermore
  • Comparatively
  • At the same time
  • Together with
  • Identically

List Of Linking Words for Sequence/Order

Any kind of essay needs to have flow. Your essay will lose its brilliance if there is a lack of consistency or logical flow of ideas. Here is a linking word list that helps by showing a sequence order in the essay.

  • First/ Second/ Third or Firstly/ secondly/ Thirdly
  • Primary/ Secondary
  • At this point of time
  • Concurrently
  • First of all
  • Following this
  • The next step
  • In the beginning
  • It all started when
  • Once upon a time
  • To begin with/ To start with

Linking Word List for Opposition/Limitation/Contradiction

However, certain linking words provide additional information, these transitional words and phrases convey opposing concepts in writing. These are:

  • Although this may be true
  • In contrast
  • Different from
  • On the other hand
  • On the contrary
  • Nonetheless
  • Even so/though
  • Nevertheless

List Of Words for The Conclusion

An essay with a strong conclusion is considered to be excellent. Unfortunately, most students conclude their essays with nearly the same words, but you have the opportunity to do so here. Look at the linking words list for an excellent conclusion:

  • To conclude
  • In conclusion
  • On the whole
  • Summarising
  • By and large
  • All things considered
  • In the long run
  • For the most part
  • By the large
  • Consequently
  • As a result

Linking Word List to Give Place/Location/Geographical Area

They can be used alone or in combination with words from other categories. They are almost often used together with other terms from the aforementioned groups. They are used to define, limit, or restrict space like the time ones. However, students often face difficulties when using linking words to write about a place and location, which ultimately leads them to buy online essay writing help from professionals. Here is your list of words that you can use to give a location or place.

  • in the background
  • in the center of
  • adjacent to
  • opposite to
  • to the left/right
  • on this site

List of Linking Words for Examples/Support/Emphasis

Transition words that provide examples or strengthen an idea might be used in your essay writing. Here is a list of words that can be used to improvise such contexts:

  • In other words
  • To put it differently
  • For one thing
  • In particular
  • As an illustration
  • In this case
  • For example
  • For instance
  • For this reason
  • To put it another way
  • To demonstrate
  • That is to say
  • With attention to
  • By all means
  • To emphasize

Words for Reason/Reference

You can use these linking words to explain connections between concepts and give explanations for what has started or happened.

  • for the purpose of
  • seeing that
  • with this in mind
  • as applied to
  • the fact that
  • granted that
  • in order to
  • with this purpose
  • considering
  • in connection to
  • with regards to
  • provided that

Linking Words for Time/Chronology/Sequence

Another function of linking words in literature is to illustrate chronology or sequence. These expressions give time a meaning that is included in the time category. These are the types of words that appear in the introduction of an essay when a writer outlines the structure of the work.

  • Sooner or later
  • Up to the present time
  • To begin with
  • Straightaway
  • In the meantime
  • In a moment
  • Without delay

Linking Words for Outcomes/Impacts/Repercussions

These particular words are used to demonstrate how one item affected another, to illustrate the outcomes of an action, or to demonstrate how something affected something else. A short list of transitions that work well for this specific category is shown below.

  • consequently
  • for this reason
  • in that case
  • as a result

Also Read: Your Guide Towards Writing An Outstanding Short Essay!

Final Thoughts!

The importance of linking words in essay writing cannot be overstated. These words are crucial for connecting concepts and making your essay read as a cohesive whole. Your essay will flow more naturally the more well-organized your thoughts are. Additionally, your writing will have a logical framework and an engaging read when you make use of linking words correctly.

However, to learn more about these words, you can choose to sign up for an online English class. An online English class will help you boost your knowledge about linking words and how you can use them in your writing. Furthermore, whenever you find yourself struggling with your English class and want to pay someone to take my online English class for me, you can hire an online class helper who will be there to take your worries aside.

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What are transition signals?

Transition signals are linking words or phrases that connect your ideas and add cohesion to your writing. They signpost or indicate to the reader the relationships between sentences and between paragraphs, making it easier for the reader to understand your ideas. We use a variety of transition signals to fulfil a number of functions. Some of these functions include: to show the order or sequence of events; to indicate that a new idea or an example will follow; to show that a contrasting idea will be presented, or to signal a summary or a conclusion.

How are transition signals useful?

Transition signals will:

•     make it easier for the reader to follow your ideas.

•     create powerful links between sentences and paragraphs to improve the flow of information across the whole text. The result is that the writing is smoother.

•     help to carry over a thought from one sentence to another, from one idea to another or from one paragraph to another.

How are transition signals used?

•     Transition signals are usually placed at the start of sentences; however, they may also appear in the middle or end of sentences.

•     A transition signal, or the clause introduced by a transition signal, is usually separated from the rest of the sentence by commas.

•     You DO NOT need to use transition signals in every sentence in a paragraph; however, good use of transition words will help to make the relationship between the ideas in your writing clear and logical.

Which transition signals can I use?

Before choosing a particular transition signal to use, be sure you understand its meaning and usage completely and be sure that it's the right match for the logic in your paper. Transition signals all have different meanings, nuances, and connotations.

•     To introduce an example:

•     To introduce an opposite idea or show exception:

•     To show agreement:

•     To introduce an additional idea:

•     To indicate sequence or order, or logically divide an idea:

•     To indicate time:

•     To compare:

•     To contrast:

•     To show cause and effect:

•     To summarise or conclude:

The example below illustrates how transition signals can be used to improve the quality of a piece of writing. Note how the ideas flow more smoothly and the logical relationships between the ideas are expressed clearly.

At HELPS, we endeavour to support UTS students in a number of ways. First , we offer 15-minute ‘drop in’ sessions with a HELPS Advisor. Making an appointment for these sessions is not necessary. Here , students can gain assistance with their academic writing and presentation skills. Specifically , students may ask for assistance with: understanding an assignment question; understanding assessment criteria; clarifying an assignment type (e.g. what’s a literature review?); planning for an assignment; strategies for effective reading/note-taking skills; and obtaining information from self-study resources. During this time , the HELPS Advisor may refer students for a longer, 40-minute consultation. Students cannot, however , book one-to-one advice sessions online; only a HELPS Advisor can do that.

Getting one-to-one advice is an opportunity for an in-depth discussion with a HELPS Advisor in relation to your specific needs on an assessment. For example , you may require assistance preparing for an oral presentation. Alternatively , you may ask a HELPS Advisor to discuss a draft of an assignment to ensure that you have addressed the assessment criteria. While HELPS Advisors cannot edit your work, they can point out persistent errors in your text and show you how to correct these. In other words , they can help you to edit your own work. 

In brief , there are many ways that HELPS can support UTS students. Students are encouraged to drop by the HELPS office which is situated in Building 1, level 5, room 25.

The Learning Centre 2013, Transition signals in writing , UNSW, viewed 20 September 2013, < https://student.unsw.edu.au/transition-signals-writing >.

Unilearning 2000, Transition signals , UOW, viewed 20 September 2013, <The UniLearning website is no longer available>.

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5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

4-minute read

  • 19th September 2022

If you’re a student writing an essay or research paper, it’s important to make sure your points flow together well. You’ll want to use connecting words (known formally as transition signals) to do this. Transition signals like thus , also , and furthermore link different ideas, and when you get to the end of your work, you need to use these to mark your conclusion. Read on to learn more about transition signals and how to use them to conclude your essays.

Transition Signals

Transition signals link sentences together cohesively, enabling easy reading and comprehension. They are usually placed at the beginning of a sentence and separated from the remaining words with a comma. There are several types of transition signals, including those to:

●  show the order of a sequence of events (e.g., first, then, next)

●  introduce an example (e.g., specifically, for instance)

●  indicate a contrasting idea (e.g., but, however, although)

●  present an additional idea (e.g., also, in addition, plus)

●  indicate time (e.g., beforehand, meanwhile, later)

●  compare (e.g., likewise, similarly)

●  show cause and effect (e.g., thus, as a result)

●  mark the conclusion – which we’ll focus on in this guide.

When you reach the end of an essay, you should start the concluding paragraph with a transition signal that acts as a bridge to the summary of your key points. Check out some concluding transition signals below and learn how you can use them in your writing.

To Conclude…

This is a particularly versatile closing statement that can be used for almost any kind of essay, including both formal and informal academic writing. It signals to the reader that you will briefly restate the main idea. As an alternative, you can begin the summary with “to close” or “in conclusion.” In an argumentative piece, you can use this phrase to indicate a call to action or opinion:

To conclude, Abraham Lincoln was the best president because he abolished slavery.

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As Has Been Demonstrated…

To describe how the evidence presented in your essay supports your argument or main idea, begin the concluding paragraph with “as has been demonstrated.” This phrase is best used for research papers or articles with heavy empirical or statistical evidence.

As has been demonstrated by the study presented above, human activities are negatively altering the climate system.

The Above Points Illustrate…

As another transitional phrase for formal or academic work, “the above points illustrate” indicates that you are reiterating your argument and that the conclusion will include an assessment of the evidence you’ve presented.

The above points illustrate that children prefer chocolate over broccoli.

In a Nutshell…

A simple and informal metaphor to begin a conclusion, “in a nutshell” prepares the reader for a summary of your paper. It can work in narratives and speeches but should be avoided in formal situations.

In a nutshell, the Beatles had an impact on musicians for generations to come.

Overall, It Can Be Said…

To recap an idea at the end of a critical or descriptive essay, you can use this phrase at the beginning of the concluding paragraph. “Overall” means “taking everything into account,” and it sums up your essay in a formal way. You can use “overall” on its own as a transition signal, or you can use it as part of a phrase.

Overall, it can be said that art has had a positive impact on humanity.

Proofreading and Editing

Transition signals are crucial to crafting a well-written and cohesive essay. For your next writing assignment, make sure you include plenty of transition signals, and check out this post for more tips on how to improve your writing. And before you turn in your paper, don’t forget to have someone proofread your work. Our expert editors will make sure your essay includes all the transition signals necessary for your writing to flow seamlessly. Send in a free 500-word sample today!

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50 Transitional Phrases for Conclusions(+ Examples You Can Use)

When writing a conclusion, you want to ensure that your final thoughts are clear and concise. Using transitional phrases can help you achieve this by linking your ideas together and making your writing flow smoothly.

Transitional phrases are words or phrases that connect one idea to another, whether it be within a sentence, paragraph, or the entire text. They signal to the reader that you are moving on to a new point or summarizing the previous one.

There are various types of transitional phrases that can be used in a conclusion. Some examples include:

  • Conclusion phrases: These phrases signal that you are wrapping up your thoughts and ending your discussion. Examples include “in conclusion,” “to sum up,” and “finally.”
  • Summary phrases: These phrases are used to summarize the main points discussed in the text. Examples include “in summary,” “to summarize,” and “overall.”
  • Transition words: These are words that connect two ideas together. Examples include “however,” “therefore,” and “moreover.”

It is important to use transitional phrases appropriately and sparingly. Overusing them can make your writing appear choppy and disjointed. Additionally, not all conclusions require the use of transitional phrases. If your ideas flow naturally from one to the next, you may not need to use them at all.

Transitional Phrases for Conclusions

When writing an essay or a speech, it is important to use transitional phrases to signal that you are reaching the end of your argument or presentation. These phrases help to summarize your main points and prepare your audience for the conclusion.

Here are some transitional phrases that you can use for conclusions:

  • In conclusion
  • To conclude
  • As a result
  • Consequently

These phrases can be used to signal that you are about to wrap up your argument or presentation. They help to guide your audience to your final thoughts and summarize the main points you have made throughout your work.

It’s important to note that these phrases should be used sparingly and appropriately. Overusing them can make your writing or speech sound repetitive and amateurish. Use them only when necessary to signal that you are reaching the end of your argument or presentation.

In addition to these phrases, you can also use other techniques to signal the end of your work. For example, you can use a rhetorical question to provoke thought or a call to action to encourage your audience to take action based on your argument.

50  Transition Phrases for Conclusions(+Examples)

  • In short, the program has been a huge success.
  • In short, we face challenges, but we’re equipped to overcome them.
  • In brief, the study covers several key points about environmental impacts.
  • In brief, the team has made remarkable progress this quarter.
  • To summarize, our findings suggest new approaches are necessary.
  • To summarize, the market trends indicate a shift towards sustainability.
  • So, we must take immediate action to address these concerns.
  • So, this evidence clearly points to the need for reform.
  • In conclusion, the evidence overwhelmingly supports the theory of climate change.
  • In conclusion, this study demonstrates the need for more research in this area.
  • To sum up, both arguments have their merits, but the benefits outweigh the drawbacks.
  • To sum up, our team’s success was due to hard work and dedication.
  • In summary, the findings suggest a significant correlation between diet and health.
  • In summary, this project has shown promising results for future development.
  • All in all, the festival was a fantastic experience, despite the minor setbacks.
  • All in all, the company’s performance this quarter has been remarkable.
  • Ultimately, the decision rests on what is best for the community.
  • Ultimately, our goal is to achieve a sustainable future.
  • Therefore, it is essential to adopt new policies to address these issues.
  • Therefore, we recommend implementing these strategies immediately.
  • Hence, the study concludes that more targeted interventions are necessary.
  • Hence, the team decided to change its approach.
  • Consequently, the species’ population has shown a significant increase.
  • Consequently, there has been a noticeable improvement in air quality.
  • Thus, the experiment successfully proves our hypothesis.
  • Thus, it’s evident that early intervention is key to success.
  • This essay’s final analysis is that social factors significantly impact learning.
  • This essay’s final analysis is that technological advancements have both pros and cons.
  • On the whole, the new policy has been beneficial to the majority.
  • On the whole, the conference provided valuable insights into the industry.
  • To conclude, further research in this field is absolutely crucial.
  • To conclude, our findings support the need for more comprehensive regulations.
  • To recap, the main points discussed highlight the need for change.
  • To recap, we have covered the historical background and current trends.
  • In essence, the theory simplifies a complex set of phenomena.
  • In essence, our mission is to empower the community.
  • In retrospect, the decision made was the best under those circumstances.
  • In retrospect, the project taught us valuable lessons about teamwork.
  • Overall, the campaign was a resounding success.
  • Overall, the results exceeded our initial expectations.
  • Finally, we would like to thank everyone who contributed to this project.
  • Finally, after much deliberation, the committee reached a consensus.
  • Accordingly, the plan was adjusted to better meet our goals.
  • Accordingly, resources will be reallocated to prioritize this initiative.
  • As a result, there has been a significant decrease in reported issues.
  • As a result, customer satisfaction has improved dramatically.
  • Clearly, the data shows a trend that cannot be ignored.
  • Clearly, our efforts have had a positive impact on the community.
  • After all, the most important thing is the wellbeing of our staff.
  • After all, our hard work has led to these remarkable results.
  • As mentioned earlier, the strategy needs to align with our objectives.
  • As mentioned earlier, these issues have been persistent for some time.
  • As has been noted, there are several limitations to this study.
  • As has been noted, the company has made significant strides in innovation.
  • As has been shown, the new approach yielded positive outcomes.
  • As has been shown, community engagement is crucial for success.
  • As we have seen, the historical context is essential for understanding this issue.
  • As we have seen, technological advancements are rapidly changing the industry.
  • Given the above points, it’s clear that a new strategy is needed.
  • Given the above points, the benefits of the proposed plan are evident.
  • By and large, the feedback on the project has been overwhelmingly positive.
  • By and large, trends indicate a growing interest in sustainable practices.
  • For the most part, the team’s efforts have been successful.
  • For the most part, the data supports our initial hypothesis.
  • As has been demonstrated, effective communication is key to success.
  • As has been demonstrated, the model accurately predicts market trends.
  • With this in mind, we must carefully plan our next steps.
  • With this in mind, the focus will be on increasing efficiency.
  • Taking everything into account, the decision was not an easy one.
  • Taking everything into account, we are confident in our future direction.
  • Considering all of these points, the committee decided to revise its approach.
  • Considering all of these points, it is evident that our strategy is working.
  • Reflecting on these facts, it’s clear that our efforts are having an impact.
  • Reflecting on these facts, we see that continuous improvement is necessary.
  • Given this evidence, we must reconsider our current policies.
  • Given this evidence, it’s apparent that the program is effective.
  • Bearing this in mind, our focus should shift towards customer satisfaction.
  • Bearing this in mind, we need to adjust our expectations accordingly.
  • Considering this, it’s imperative that we act quickly to implement changes.
  • Considering this, our plan must be flexible enough to accommodate new data.
  • With regard to these points, the data suggests a need for a new approach.
  • With regard to these points, our team’s strategy has been largely successful.
  • Upon reflecting, it’s evident that teamwork played a crucial role in our success.
  • Upon reflecting, the challenges faced were significant but surmountable.
  • Taking this into consideration, our next steps should be carefully planned.
  • Taking this into consideration, the project’s scope may need to be expanded.
  • Drawing from these conclusions, it’s clear that more research is needed.
  • Drawing from these conclusions, our approach has proven effective.
  • From this perspective, the long-term benefits of the project are clear.
  • From this perspective, we can see the importance of continuous innovation.
  • Looking back on this, the progress we’ve made is substantial.
  • Looking back on this, lessons learned will inform our future strategies.
  • Upon examination, the results support the need for more targeted efforts.
  • Upon examination, our strategies have been effective in several key areas.
  • In light of these facts, a revision of our strategy is advisable.
  • In light of these facts, the success of the initiative is undeniable.
  • After considering all these factors, the decision was unanimous.
  • After considering all these factors, our path forward is clear.
  • Having discussed all these points, it’s time to make a decision.
  • Having discussed all these points, the direction for the future is set.

Transitional Phrases for Adding Information

When writing a conclusion, it is important to add information that supports your thesis statement. Transitional phrases can help you do this by linking your ideas together and making your writing more coherent. Here are some transitional phrases that you can use to add information to your conclusion:

  • First: Use this phrase to introduce the first point that supports your thesis statement. For example, “First, it is important to consider the impact of climate change on our planet.”
  • Second: Use this phrase to introduce the second point that supports your thesis statement. For example, “Second, we need to take action to reduce our carbon footprint.”
  • Third: Use this phrase to introduce the third point that supports your thesis statement. For example, “Third, we must work together to create a sustainable future for generations to come.”
  • Addition: Use this phrase to add more information to support your previous point. For example, “In addition, recent studies have shown that global temperatures are rising at an alarming rate.”
  • In addition: Use this phrase to add more information to your previous point. For example, “In addition, we need to invest in renewable energy sources to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.”
  • Moreover: Use this phrase to add more information that strengthens your argument. For example, “Moreover, the use of electric cars can help reduce air pollution in our cities.”
  • Furthermore: Use this phrase to add more information that supports your argument. For example, “Furthermore, investing in public transportation can help reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality.”
  • Also: Use this phrase to add more information that supports your argument. For example, “Also, we need to educate people about the importance of recycling and reducing waste.”
  • Too: Use this phrase to add more information that supports your argument. For example, “We need to reduce our carbon footprint, and we can do so by using energy-efficient appliances and light bulbs, too.”
  • Another: Use this phrase to add another point that supports your thesis statement. For example, “Another way to reduce our carbon footprint is by planting more trees, which absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.”
  • For example: Use this phrase to provide an example that supports your argument. For example, “For example, the city of Copenhagen has set a goal to become carbon-neutral by 2025.”
  • For instance: Use this phrase to provide an example that supports your argument. For example, “For instance, the use of solar panels can help reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.”
  • Especially: Use this phrase to emphasize a point that supports your argument. For example, “Especially in urban areas, we need to invest in green spaces to improve air quality and reduce the urban heat island effect.”
  • Particularly: Use this phrase to emphasize a point that supports your argument. For example, “Particularly in developing countries, we need to promote sustainable agriculture practices to reduce deforestation and soil degradation.”
  • Indeed: Use this phrase to emphasize a point that supports your argument. For example, “Indeed, the evidence shows that climate change is a real and urgent threat to our planet.”
  • In fact: Use this phrase to provide a fact that supports your argument. For example, “In fact, the burning of fossil fuels is the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.”

Transitional Phrases for Comparing and Contrasting

When writing an essay or article, it is important to compare and contrast different ideas or concepts. Transitional phrases can help you do this effectively by guiding the reader through your thought process. Here are some transitional phrases that you can use to compare and contrast different ideas:

  • Contrast: If you want to highlight the differences between two ideas, you can use transitional phrases such as “on the other hand” or “however”. For example, “The new product is cheaper than the old one. However, it is not as durable.”
  • Like/Likewise/Similarly: If you want to show that two ideas are similar, you can use transitional phrases such as “like”, “likewise”, or “similarly”. For example, “Both products are made from organic materials. Likewise, they are both environmentally friendly.”
  • On the contrary: If you want to show that two ideas are opposite, you can use transitional phrases such as “on the contrary”. For example, “Some people believe that technology will save the world. On the contrary, others believe that technology is destroying the planet.”
  • Despite/Nevertheless: If you want to show that two ideas are contradictory, you can use transitional phrases such as “despite” or “nevertheless”. For example, “Despite the fact that the new product is more expensive, it is still selling well.”
  • While/Equally: If you want to show that two ideas are of equal importance, you can use transitional phrases such as “while” or “equally”. For example, “While the new product is more expensive, it is also more durable.”

Using transitional phrases can help you compare and contrast different ideas in a clear and concise manner. By using these phrases, you can guide the reader through your thought process and make your writing more engaging and informative.

Transitional Phrases for Cause and Effect

When writing an article or essay, it is important to use transitional phrases to link ideas and concepts. One of the most commonly used types of transitional phrases is the cause-and-effect transitional phrase. These phrases help to connect two events or actions and describe how one event or action led to another.

Some of the most commonly used transitional phrases for cause and effect include “cause,” “result,” “because,” “as a result,” “consequently,” “hence,” “thus,” and “cause and effect.” These phrases can be used at the beginning of a sentence to indicate the cause of an event or action, or at the end of a sentence to indicate the effect of an event or action.

For example, you can use the transitional phrase “because” to indicate the cause of an event or action. For instance, “Because of the heavy rain, the streets were flooded.” Here, the cause of the flooded streets is heavy rain.

Another commonly used transitional phrase for cause and effect is “as a result.” For example, “The company experienced a loss of profits this quarter. As a result, they are considering cutting back on expenses.” Here, the effect of the loss of profits is the company’s decision to cut back on expenses.

In addition to “cause” and “result,” other transitional phrases that can be used to indicate cause and effect include “consequently,” “hence,” and “thus.” These transitional phrases are useful for indicating the relationship between two events or actions.

Transitional Phrases for Time and Sequence

When you are writing about a sequence of events, transitional words and phrases can help you order things chronologically. Without these time order words, it can be difficult for your reader to logically follow what you are saying. Here are some transitional phrases for time and sequence that you can use in your writing:

  • Subsequently

Using these transitional phrases for time and sequence can help you structure your writing in a clear and organized way. For example, if you are writing a process essay, you can use these phrases to describe each step of the process in a logical order.

In addition to using transitional phrases, it’s important to make sure that your writing is clear and concise. Avoid using overly complex sentences or jargon that might confuse your reader. Instead, use simple language that is easy to understand.

Transitional Phrases for Concluding Thoughts

When writing an essay or a speech, it is essential to conclude your thoughts in a clear and concise manner. Transitional phrases can help you achieve this by linking your ideas together and providing a smooth transition to your conclusion. Here are some transitional phrases that you can use for concluding thoughts:

  • To conclude: This phrase is a straightforward way to signal that you are about to summarize your main points and reach a conclusion. It is a great transitional phrase to use when you want to wrap up your thoughts.
  • To summarize: Similar to “to conclude,” this phrase is an excellent way to signal that you are about to summarize your main points. It is a slightly more formal way to conclude your thoughts.
  • In summary: This phrase is a concise way to summarize the main points of your essay or speech. It is a great transitional phrase to use when you want to wrap up your thoughts quickly.
  • To sum up: This phrase is another concise way to summarize your main points. It is a great transitional phrase to use when you want to emphasize the most important points of your essay or speech.
  • Overall: This phrase is a great way to signal that you are about to provide a general overview of your essay or speech. It is a great transitional phrase to use when you want to emphasize the most important points of your thoughts.
  • Finally: This phrase is a great way to signal that you are about to reach a conclusion. It is a great transitional phrase to use when you want to emphasize the finality of your thoughts.
  • Hence, thus, therefore: These phrases are all great ways to signal a cause-and-effect relationship between your ideas. They are great transitional phrases to use when you want to emphasize the logical progression of your thoughts. .

Practical Examples of Transitional Phrases

When it comes to writing conclusions, transitional phrases can help you effectively summarize your main points and leave a lasting impression on your reader. Here are some practical examples of transitional phrases that you can use to make your writing more cohesive and engaging:

  • In conclusion: This is a classic transitional phrase that signals the end of your discussion. It helps to summarize your main points and leave a lasting impression on your reader. For example, “In conclusion, it is clear that climate change is a pressing issue that requires immediate action from policymakers and individuals alike.”
  • To sum up: This transitional phrase is similar to “in conclusion” and can be used to restate your main points. For example, “To sum up, the evidence suggests that regular exercise can have a positive impact on mental health.”
  • In summary: This phrase is useful for providing a brief overview of your main points. For example, “In summary, the research indicates that social media use can have both positive and negative effects on mental health.”
  • To illustrate: Use this phrase to provide examples that support your main points. For example, “To illustrate, studies have shown that meditation can help reduce stress and anxiety.”
  • In other words: This phrase is useful for restating your ideas in a different way. For example, “In other words, the study suggests that there is a strong correlation between sleep deprivation and poor academic performance.”
  • As a result: This phrase is useful for discussing the consequences of your main points. For example, “As a result, it is important for individuals to make a conscious effort to reduce their carbon footprint.”

By incorporating these transitional phrases into your writing, you can effectively summarize your main points and leave a lasting impression on your reader. Whether you are writing an essay, paper, or discussion post, these practical examples can help you elevate your writing and make it more cohesive and engaging.

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CONCLUSION Transition Words: Useful List & Examples

Posted on Last updated: March 7, 2023

CONCLUSION Transition Words: Useful List & Examples

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CONCLUSION Transition Words! Following is a list of 40+ transition words of conclusion with example sentences in English. They’re really helpful for you to master your writing and speaking skills .

Table of Contents

Conclusion Transition Words

List of conclusion transitions.

  • generally speaking
  • in the final analysis
  • all things considered
  • as shown above
  • in the long run
  • given these points
  • as has been noted
  • for the most part
  • in conclusion
  • to summarize
  • by and large
  • on the whole
  • in any event
  • in either case
  • as a result
  • consequently
  • to conclude
  • taking everything into account
  • in light of these facts
  • without a doubt

Conclusion Transition Words with Examples

Learn useful conclusion transition words with example sentences in English.

Generally speaking, it’s quite a good school.

In the final analysis, the only people who will benefit are property owners.

She took it very well, all things considered.

It’s possible, as shown above, to write a rename rule that converts case-sensitive files into lowercase file names, thereby causing clashes among previously unique file names.

In the long run, it works out more expensive to rent a television than to buy one.

Given these points, it’s clearly time to consider some changes. In the long run, these recommendations will benefit our company.

But there was much evidence of divided counsels on both the Labour and Conservative sides, as has been noted above.

In a word, the whole plan fell through.

He was, for the most part, quite helpful.

The world is but a little place, after all.

Experience is not interesting till it begins to repeat itself, in fact, till it does that, it hardly is experience.

In summary, this was a disappointing performance.

In conclusion, I would like to say how much I have enjoyed myself today.

Try tennis, badminton or windsurfing. In short, anything challenging.

In brief, I have made up my mind to quit the job.

In essence, all computers are the same.

To summarize, the organic compounds found in cells are built up and broken down by enzymes.

On balance, the company has had a successful year.

Altogether, our achievements are very great.

Overall, the tone of the book is satirical/the book is satirical in tone.

Ordinarily, he didn’t like to go to the movies.

Usually when Opposition MPs question Ministers they are just playing party politics.

By and large, I enjoyed my time at school.

To sum up, there are three main ways of tackling the problem

On the whole, I’m happy with the way I look.

In any event, the worst that she can do is say ‘no’.

In either case, public spending should increase by the income elasticity of demand.

All in all, I love the summer very much! You should start practising your English from now on.

Obviously, television has both advantages and disadvantages.

Ultimately, the war had to end; it cost too much in both lives and dollars.

Ending a relationship is always hard but in this case, it’s definitely for the best.

  • as can be seen

As can be seen from the picture the background is the Muda Dam.

Conclusion Transitions | Infographic

CONCLUSION Transition Words

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Useful Linking Words and Phrases to Use in Your Essays

By: Author Sophia

Posted on Last updated: October 26, 2023

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Linking words and phrases are used to show relationships between ideas. They can be used to join two or more sentences or clauses.

We can use linking words to give a result , add information , summarize , give illustrations , emphasize a point , sequence information , compare or to contrast idea .

Useful Linking Words and Phrases

In this article, you will learn about the most common linking words and phrases:

Useful Linking Words and Phrases

Giving a Result

Usage : To provide the result of what has been stated or has occurred

Linking W ords :

  • As a result
  • As a consequence
  • Consequently
  • For this reason
  • His wife left him.  As a result , he became very depressed.
  • She has lived in France, and  as a consequence  she speaks French fluently.
  • We do not have enough money.  T herefore  we cannot afford to buy the new car.
  • We do not own the building.  Thus , it would be impossible for us to make any major changes to it.
  • There has been a great deal of rain and  consequently  the reservoirs are full.
  • The customer was displeased with her meal,  hence  the chef prepared a replacement.
  • For this reason , they are not a good choice for exterior use.
  • Due to  a broken wing, this bird can’t fly.

Useful Linking Words and Phrases

Adding Information

Usage : To add to what has been previously stated

Linking Words:

  • Additionally / an additional
  • Furthermore
  • As well as that
  • In addition
  • In addition to this
  • Apart from this
  • Additionally , the bus service will run on Sundays, every two hours.
  • He said he had not discussed the matter with her.  Furthermore , he had not even contacted her.
  • We are unable to repair this watch.  Also , this is the fourth time this has happened.
  • I love wearing earrings. I design and make them  too .
  • We went to the park today.  As well as that , we did some shopping.
  • Along with  parties and parliaments, elections have lost their charm.
  • I can’t afford to go to the concert.  Besides , I don’t really like classical music.
  • You haven’t paid the rent yet.   In addition , you owe me money.
  • The report is badly presented.  Moreover , it contains inaccuracies.
  • John’s grades are terrible because he has been so lazy these days.  In addition to this , his relationship to his parents got worse.
  • Apart from this  paragraph, the report contains a number of sensible initiatives.

Adding information

Summarizing

Usage : To sump up what has been previously stated

Linking words :

  • In conclusion
  • To summarize
  • To conclude
  • In conclusion , walking is a cheap, safe, enjoyable and readily available form of exercise.
  • To summarize , this is a clever approach to a common problem.
  • The food was good and we loved the music.  Altogether  it was a great evening.
  • His novels belong to a great but vanished age. They are,  in short , old-fashioned.
  • To sum up , there are three main ways of tackling the problem…
  • In summary , this was a disappointing performance.
  • Briefly , our team is now one of the best in the world.
  • To conclude , I want to wish you all a very happy holiday season.

Giving Examples

Usage : To provide examples

Linking words:

  • For example/ For instance
  • In this case
  • Proof of this
  • There are many interesting places to visit in the city,  for example / for instance , the botanical garden or the art museum.
  • I prefer to wear casual clothes,  such as  jeans and a sweatshirt.
  • Including  Christmas Day and Boxing Day, I’ve got a week off work.
  • We need to concentrate on our target audience,  namely  women aged between 20 and 30.
  • I think I would have made a difference  in this case .
  • This building are a living  proof of this  existence, so we must preserve it.
  • I also make other jewellery  like  rings and bracelets.

Emphasizing a Point

Usage : To put forward a point or idea more forcefully

  • Undoubtedly
  • Particularly / in particular
  • Importantly
  • Without a doubt
  • It should be noted
  • Unquestionably
  • Undoubtedly , the story itself is one of the main attractions.
  • I don’t mind at all.  Indeed , I would be delighted to help.
  • Obviously , we don’t want to spend too much money.
  • I love silver earrings,  in particular  ones from Mexico
  • The car is quite small,  especially  if you have children.
  • Clearly , this will cost a lot more than we realized.
  • More importantly , can he be trusted?
  • He’s an  absolutely  brilliant cook.
  • I  definitely  remember sending the letter.
  • We still believe we can win this series  without a doubt .
  • I’m  neve r  surprised at what I do.
  • It should be noted  that   if you have something to note, then note it
  • Unquestionably , teaching has been a paramount part of his career.
  • Above all , this forest is designed for wear and tear.
  • This is  positively  the worst thing that I can even imagine.

Useful Linking Words and Phrases

Sequencing Ideas

Usage : To indicate the order of what is being said

  • First/ firstly (Second/ secondly, Third/ thirdly, Finally)
  • At this time
  • Subsequently
  • Lastly and most importantly
  • Last but not least
  • First and foremost
  • Firstly , I prefer the train because I can see the landscape.
  • At this time , the young man leapt into the air and flew off towards sunset.
  • They arrived on Monday evening and we got there the  following  day.
  • I had visited them three days  previously .
  • Your name is  before  mine on the list.
  • Subsequently , new guidelines were issued to all employees.
  • Above all , keep in touch.
  • Lastly, and most importantly , you should be optimistic.
  • Last but not least , I find I seriously cannot relate to women.
  • We will continue to focus on our players  first and foremost .

Sequencing Ideas

Comparing Ideas

Usage:  To show how things are similar

  • Compare / compare(d) to(with)
  • By the same token
  • In the same way
  • Correspondingly
  • Similarly , the basketball and hockey games draw nearly full attendance.
  • Equally , not all customers are honest.
  • Her second marriage was  likewise  unhappy.
  • She’s  just as  smart as her sister.
  • Working with housecats is  just like  working with lions or tigers.
  • Some people say I have a running style  similar to  him.
  • Having a power is not  the same as  using the power.
  • He gets the ball off quickly  compared to  two years ago.
  • Teenagers should be more respectful;  by the same token , parents should be more understanding.
  • Alex enjoys telling jokes;  in the same way/similarly/likewise ,his son adores funny stories.
  • Correspondingly , the roles each of them played were soon different.

Contrasting Ideas

Usage : To show how things are different

  • Nevertheless
  • On the other hand
  • Nonetheless
  • Despite / in spite of
  • In contrast (to)
  • Alternatively
  • Differing from
  • Contrary to
  • Unlike  most systems, this one is very easy to install.
  • There is little chance that we will succeed in changing the law.  Nevertheless , it is important that we try.
  • Laptops are convenient;  O n the other hand , they can be expensive.
  • The problems are not serious.  Nonetheless , we shall need to tackle them soon.
  • Despite/ In spite of  the rain, I went for a walk.
  • In contrast to  the diligent bee, the butterfly flies hither and yon with no apparent purpose.
  • The agency will make travel arrangements for you.  Alternatively , you can organize your own transport.
  • Northern European countries had a great summer.  On the contrary/conversely , Southern Europe had poor weather.
  • Even so , many old friends were shocked at the announcement.
  • Differing from  his white colleagues, he preferred instructing his scholars to the ambition of acquiring personal renown.
  • The situation in Ireland is quite  contrary to  this principle.

Useful Linking Words and Phrases

Linking Words for Essays | Images

Below is a handy list of words that are both useful and appropriate to academic language:

Linking Words for Essays

Other linking words to give an example or an illustration:

  • In  this  case,
  • In  another  case
  • Take  the  case  of
  • To  illustrate
  • As  an
  • Illustration
  • To  take  another  example
  • That  is
  • As  shown  by
  • As  illustrated  by
  • As expressed by

Linking Words for Essays

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Essay Writing Guide

Transition Words For Essays

Last updated on: Dec 19, 2023

220 Best Transition Words for Essays

By: Nova A.

15 min read

Reviewed By: Jacklyn H.

Published on: Jul 9, 2019

Transition Words for Essays

Writing essays can be hard, and making sure your transitions are smooth is even harder. 

You've probably heard that good essays need good transitions, but what are they? How do you use them in your writing? Also, your essays are assessed according to particular criteria and it is your responsibility to ensure that it is being met.

But don't worry, we are here to help. This blog will give you transition words for essays, including how to choose the right ones and where to place them for maximum impact. Essay writing is a technical process that requires much more effort than simply pouring your thoughts on paper.

If you are new to the concept of transition words and phrases, deep dive into this article in order to find out the secret to improving your essays.

Transition Words for Essays

On this Page

What Are Transition Words 

Transition words are essential elements in essay writing that create smooth transitions between ideas. 

Think of a transition as a conjunction or a joining word. It helps create strong relationships between ideas, paragraphs, or sentences and assists the readers to understand the word phrases and sentences easily.

As writers, our goal is to communicate our thoughts and ideas in the most clear and logical manner. Especially when presenting complex ideas, we must ensure that they are being conveyed in the most understandable way.

To ensure that your paper is easy to understand, you can work on the sequencing of ideas. Break down your ideas into different sentences and paragraphs then use a transition word or phrase to guide them through these ideas.

Why Should You Use Transitions

The purpose of transition words goes beyond just connectivity. They create a cohesive narrative , allowing your ideas to flow seamlessly from one point to another. These words and phrases act as signposts and indicate relationships. 

These relations could include:

  • Cause and Effect
  • Comparison and Contrast
  • Addition and Emphasis
  • Sequence and Order
  • Illustration and Example
  • Concession and Contradiction
  • Summary and Conclusion

They form a bridge and tie sentences together, creating a logical connection. In addition to tying the entire paper together, they help demonstrate the writer’s agreement, disagreement, conclusion, or contrast.

However, keep in mind that just using or including transitional words isn’t enough to highlight relationships between ideas. The content of your paragraphs must support the relationship as well. So, you should avoid overusing them in a paper.

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Types of Transitions

Transitions in essays can be classified into different types based on the relationships they indicate between ideas. Each type serves a specific purpose in guiding readers through your arguments. 

Let's explore some common types of transitions and their examples:

Additive Transitions 

These transitions are used to add information or ideas. They help you expand on your points or provide additional supporting evidence. Examples:

  • In addition
  • Furthermore
  • Additionally
  • Not only... but also
  • Coupled with

Adversative Transitions

Adversative transitions show contrast or contradiction between ideas. They are used to present opposing viewpoints or highlight differences. Examples:

  • Nevertheless
  • On the other hand
  • In contrast

Causal Transitions

Causal transitions explain cause-and-effect relationships. They help you establish the reasons behind certain outcomes or actions. Examples:

  • As a result
  • Consequently
  • Resulting in
  • For this reason

Sequential Transitions

Sequential transitions indicate the order or sequence of events or ideas. They help you present your thoughts in a logical and organized manner. Examples: 

  • Subsequently
  • In the meantime
  • Simultaneously

Comparative Transitions

Comparative transitions highlight similarities or comparisons between ideas. They help you draw connections and illustrate relationships. Here are some transition words for essays examples: 

  • In the same way
  • Compared to
  • In comparison
  • Correspondingly
  • By the same token
  • Equally important
  • Analogous to

Getting started on your essay? Check out this insightful read on essay writing to make sure you ace it!

List of Good Transition Words for Essays

As mentioned above, there are different categories of transitions that serve a unique purpose. Understanding these different types will help you pick the most suitable word or phrase to communicate your message.

Here we have categorized the best transition words for essays so you can use them appropriately!

Transition Words for Argumentative Essays

In argumentative essays , the effective use of transition words is essential for presenting a well-structured and coherent argument. 

Transition Words for Compare and Contrast Essays

In compare and contrast essays , transition words play a crucial role in highlighting the similarities and differences between the subjects being compared. 

Here are a few transition words that are particularly useful in compare and contrast essays:

Transition Words for Cause and Effect Essays

In cause and effect essays , transition words help illustrate the relationships between causes and their corresponding effects. 

Here are a few transition words that are particularly useful in cause-and-effect essays:

Transition Words for Different Parts of Essays

Transition words are valuable tools that can be used throughout different parts of an essay to create a smooth and coherent flow. By understanding the appropriate transition words for each section, you can logically connect your ideas. 

Introduction Transition Words for Essays

Introductions are one of the most impactful parts of the essay. It's important that it connects logically with the rest of the essay. To do this, you can utilize different transition words for essays to start. Here are some starting transition words for essays:

Transition Words for Essays Body Paragraph

In an essay, body paragraphs play a crucial role in presenting and developing your ideas. To ensure a logical flow within each body paragraph, the strategic use of transition words is essential.

Here are lists of transitions for essays for different body paragraphs:

Transition Words for Essays for First Body Paragraph

Here is a list of transition words that you can use for the first body paragraph of an essay:

Transition Words for Essays Second Body Paragraph

Here is a list of transition words for the second body paragraph of an essay:

Transition Words for Essays Third Body Paragraph

Transition words for essays last body paragraph, transition words for essays conclusion .

Here is a list of ending transition words for essays:

Do’s and Don’ts of Using Essay Transitions

When it comes to using transitions in your essay, there are certain do's and don'ts that can help you effectively enhance the flow of your writing. Here are some key guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Add transitions only when introducing new ideas.
  • Go through the paper to make sure they make sense.
  • Start by creating an outline, so you know what ideas to share and how.
  • Use different transitions for each idea.
  • Don’t overuse them.
  • Don’t keep adding transitions in the same paragraph.
  • Don’t completely rely on transitions to signal relationships.
  • Don’t incorporate it into your content without understanding its usage.

By now, you have probably understood how transition words can save you from disjointed and directionless paragraphs. They are the missing piece that indicates how ideas are related to one another. You can also generate more essays with our AI powered essay writer to learn the art of transitioning smoothly from one paragraph to another. 

If you are still unable to distinguish transitions to open or conclude your essays, don’t be upset - these things require time and practice.

If you are looking for the perfect essay-writing service, get in touch with the expert writers at 5StarEssays.com. We will include the right transitions according to the type of paper, ensuring a coherent flow of ideas.

Just say ‘ write my essay ’ now and let our essay writer create quality content at the most pocket-friendly rates available.

Nova A.

As a Digital Content Strategist, Nova Allison has eight years of experience in writing both technical and scientific content. With a focus on developing online content plans that engage audiences, Nova strives to write pieces that are not only informative but captivating as well.

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EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence in the EU will be regulated by the AI Act, the world’s first comprehensive AI law. Find out how it will protect you.

A man faces a computer generated figure with programming language in the background

As part of its digital strategy , the EU wants to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure better conditions for the development and use of this innovative technology. AI can create many benefits , such as better healthcare; safer and cleaner transport; more efficient manufacturing; and cheaper and more sustainable energy.

In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU regulatory framework for AI. It says that AI systems that can be used in different applications are analysed and classified according to the risk they pose to users. The different risk levels will mean more or less regulation. Once approved, these will be the world’s first rules on AI.

Learn more about what artificial intelligence is and how it is used

What Parliament wants in AI legislation

Parliament’s priority is to make sure that AI systems used in the EU are safe, transparent, traceable, non-discriminatory and environmentally friendly. AI systems should be overseen by people, rather than by automation, to prevent harmful outcomes.

Parliament also wants to establish a technology-neutral, uniform definition for AI that could be applied to future AI systems.

Learn more about Parliament’s work on AI and its vision for AI’s future

AI Act: different rules for different risk levels

The new rules establish obligations for providers and users depending on the level of risk from artificial intelligence. While many AI systems pose minimal risk, they need to be assessed.

Unacceptable risk

Unacceptable risk AI systems are systems considered a threat to people and will be banned. They include:

  • Cognitive behavioural manipulation of people or specific vulnerable groups: for example voice-activated toys that encourage dangerous behaviour in children
  • Social scoring: classifying people based on behaviour, socio-economic status or personal characteristics
  • Biometric identification and categorisation of people
  • Real-time and remote biometric identification systems, such as facial recognition

Some exceptions may be allowed for law enforcement purposes. “Real-time” remote biometric identification systems will be allowed in a limited number of serious cases, while “post” remote biometric identification systems, where identification occurs after a significant delay, will be allowed to prosecute serious crimes and only after court approval.

AI systems that negatively affect safety or fundamental rights will be considered high risk and will be divided into two categories:

1) AI systems that are used in products falling under the EU’s product safety legislation . This includes toys, aviation, cars, medical devices and lifts.

2) AI systems falling into specific areas that will have to be registered in an EU database:

  • Management and operation of critical infrastructure
  • Education and vocational training
  • Employment, worker management and access to self-employment
  • Access to and enjoyment of essential private services and public services and benefits
  • Law enforcement
  • Migration, asylum and border control management
  • Assistance in legal interpretation and application of the law.

All high-risk AI systems will be assessed before being put on the market and also throughout their lifecycle.

General purpose and generative AI

Generative AI, like ChatGPT, would have to comply with transparency requirements:

  • Disclosing that the content was generated by AI
  • Designing the model to prevent it from generating illegal content
  • Publishing summaries of copyrighted data used for training

High-impact general-purpose AI models that might pose systemic risk, such as the more advanced AI model GPT-4, would have to undergo thorough evaluations and any serious incidents would have to be reported to the European Commission.

Limited risk

Limited risk AI systems should comply with minimal transparency requirements that would allow users to make informed decisions. After interacting with the applications, the user can then decide whether they want to continue using it. Users should be made aware when they are interacting with AI. This includes AI systems that generate or manipulate image, audio or video content, for example deepfakes.

On December 9 2023, Parliament reached a provisional agreement with the Council on the AI act . The agreed text will now have to be formally adopted by both Parliament and Council to become EU law. Before all MEPs have their say on the agreement, Parliament’s internal market and civil liberties committees will vote on it.

More on the EU’s digital measures

  • Cryptocurrency dangers and the benefits of EU legislation
  • Fighting cybercrime: new EU cybersecurity laws explained
  • Boosting data sharing in the EU: what are the benefits?
  • EU Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act
  • Five ways the European Parliament wants to protect online gamers
  • Artificial Intelligence Act

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  1. Transition Words & Phrases

    Transition words and phrases (also called linking words, connecting words, or transitional words) are used to link together different ideas in your text. They help the reader to follow your arguments by expressing the relationships between different sentences or parts of a sentence. Transition words example

  2. Linking Words

    | Candace Osmond | Grammar Worried that your essay lacks structure and coherence? Perhaps you should use linking words, transition words, or connectors to give it a boost. Linking words join separate sentences to improve writing flow. You can also find them mid-sentence to connect clauses.

  3. Ending the Essay: Conclusions

    Conclude by linking the last paragraph to the first, perhaps by reiterating a word or phrase you used at the beginning. Conclude with a sentence composed mainly of one-syllable words. Simple language can help create an effect of understated drama. ... Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay: Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief ...

  4. Linking/transition words

    When the transition word is at the beginning of the sentence, it should be followed by a comma: Among other functions, they can signal cause and effect or sequencing (see examples in the table below). Linking words: conjunctions Linking words within a sentence are referred to as coordinating conjunctions.

  5. All About Linking Words, With Examples

    Updated on April 19, 2023 Grammar Linking words, also known as transition words, are words and phrases like however or on the other hand that connect clauses, sentences, paragraphs, or other words.

  6. 5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

    19th September 2022 5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays If you're a student writing an essay or research paper, it's important to make sure your points flow together well. You'll want to use connecting words (known formally as transition signals) to do this.

  7. Transition Words and Phrases Examples

    One transition phrase you were probably taught in school is in conclusion, a common way to begin an essay's final paragraph. As you moved further in your academic career, you were probably taught to move away from these transition phrases and use subtler ones in your writing. Here's a tip: Want to make sure your writing shines?

  8. Transition Sentences

    Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections. Example of a transition sentence for a new paragraph. …. In this case, the researchers concluded that the ...

  9. Transitional Words and Phrases

    Transitional words and phrases can create powerful links between ideas in your paper and can help your reader understand the logic of your paper. However, these words all have different meanings, nuances, and connotations. Before using a particular transitional word in your paper, be sure you understand its meaning and usage completely and be sure…

  10. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    When you write an essay for a course you are taking, you are being asked not only to create a product (the essay) but, more importantly, to go through a process of thinking more deeply about a question or problem related to the course. By writing about a source or collection of sources, you will have the chance to wrestle with some of the

  11. Conclusions

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  12. 92 Essay Transition Words to Know, With Examples

    What are essay transition words? In general, transition words and phrases bridge the gap between two topics whose connection isn't obvious. Transition words and phrases like however, although, likewise, and on the contrary cue the reader that a change is coming so they know to expect it.

  13. Linking Words for Essays: How to Link Those Paragraphs and Sentences

    Linking Words for Essays: How to Link Those Paragraphs and Sentences Udemy Editor Share this article What you write about is only part of what makes up a great essay. Without good flow, your writers will end up lost or bored, so be sure your writing flows.

  14. Conclusion Transition Words: Definition, List and Helpful Examples

    We are now going to look at a list of conclusion transition words to expand your vocabulary and give you the opportunity to make your conclusion sound pulled together and complete. Overall. All in all. All things considered. To sum up. To conclude. Ultimately. In short. Finally.

  15. 42 Summary & conclusion transition words (with examples)

    A conclusion comes at the end of a speech, chapter, or piece of text, and it brings together all of the points mentioned. A summary, however, can be placed anywhere (even at the beginning). A summary gives a brief outline of the main points but is not as in-depth as a conclusion.

  16. Linking Words To Use In An Essay

    Linking words serves as a means of connecting the ideas or thoughts expressed in essays. Moreover, the use of linking words makes your writing look more logical. Thus, you should use proper linking words to reduce the reading efforts of the readers. Your essay shouldn't cause readers mental strain to understand it.

  17. Transition signals

    Transition signals are linking words or phrases that connect your ideas and add cohesion to your writing. They signpost or indicate to the reader the relationships between sentences and between paragraphs, making it easier for the reader to understand your ideas. We use a variety of transition signals to fulfil a number of functions.

  18. 50 linking words to use in academic writing

    50 linking words to use in academic writing academic writing linkers essay writing thesis ESL English It's very common for students to use long words they don't understand very well in their essays and theses because they have a certain idea of what academic writing should be.

  19. 5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

    There are several types of transition signals, including those to: show the order of a sequence of events (e.g., first, then, next) indicate a contrasting idea (e.g., but, however, although) present an additional idea (e.g., also, in addition, plus) mark the conclusion - which we'll focus on in this guide.

  20. 50 Transitional Phrases for Conclusions (+ Examples You Can Use)

    Examples include "in summary," "to summarize," and "overall." Transition words: These are words that connect two ideas together. Examples include "however," "therefore," and "moreover." It is important to use transitional phrases appropriately and sparingly. Overusing them can make your writing appear choppy and disjointed.

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    UR MOM. Tuesday 1st of November 2022. SLAY. gug. Thursday 12th of January 2023. bro dont say that man\. CONCLUSION Transition Words! Following is a list of 31 transition words of conclusion with example sentences in English. They're really helpful for you to master your writing and speaking skills.

  22. Useful Linking Words and Phrases to Use in Your Essays

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    Transition Words for Essays for First Body Paragraph. Here is a list of transition words that you can use for the first body paragraph of an essay: Firstly. To start off. Primarily. Another important factor is. To begin with. In the beginning. Above all.

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  26. EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

    In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU regulatory framework for AI. It says that AI systems that can be used in different applications are analysed and classified according to the risk they pose to users. The different risk levels will mean more or less regulation. Once approved, these will be the world's first rules on ...