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Standard format for citation

Conference paper in print proceedings:

Conference paper fom the internet:

DOI available:

No DOI available:

Conference proceedings:

Conference paper in print proceedings

Author full first name provided

Singh, Kamal, and Gary Best. 2004. "Film Induced Tourism: Motivations of Visitors to the Hobbiton Movie Set as Featured in 'The Lord of the Rings'." In Proceedings of the 1st International Tourism and Media Conference, Melbourne, 2004 , 98-111. Melbourne: Tourism Research Unit, Monash University.

Conference paper from the internet

Author first names' initials only provided

Beckermann, M. 2010. "Regeneration Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Signals, Signposts and Scaffolds." Paper presented at the  Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference (BSEC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, May 25-26, 2010 . https://doi.org/10.1109/BSEC.2010.5510841.

Conference proceedings

Hall, Kira, Michael Meacham, and Richard Shapiro, ed. 1989. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society: General Session and Parasession on Theoretical Issues in Language Reconstruction, February 18-20, 1989 . Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Linguistics Society.

See the  All Examples  page for examples of in-text and reference list entries for specific resources such as articles, books, conference papers and web pages.

Reference list entries.

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Home / Guides / Citation Guides / Chicago Style / How to Cite a Conference Paper in Chicago/Turabian

How to Cite a Conference Paper in Chicago/Turabian

Titles of unpublished works appear in quotes, not italics. If the paper has been published in the conference proceedings, treat it like the chapter of a book ; if it was published in a journal, treat it as a journal article .

1. Author First Name Last Name, “Title of the Paper” (paper presentation, Name of Conference, Location of Conference, Month Day, Year of conference).

Bibliography:

Last name, First name. “Title of the Paper.” Paper presented at the Name of Conference, Location of Conference, Month and year of conference.

1. Allison Cloyd, “A Examination of the Citation Habits of College Students” (paper presentation, EasyBib Information Literacy Conference, New York, NY, July 30, 2014).

Cloyd, Allison. “A Examination of the Citation Habits of College Students.” Paper presented at the EasyBib Information Literacy Conference, New York, NY, July 2014.

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Chicago Referencing – Citing a Conference Paper (Footnotes)

Chicago Referencing – Citing a Conference Paper (Footnotes)

  • 2-minute read
  • 22nd August 2018

Conference proceedings are a great resource for students. And since academics attend conferences to discuss cutting-edge research , proceedings often include exciting new ideas.

But how do you cite a conference paper? In this post, we explain this using Chicago footnote referencing.

Footnote Citations

In Chicago referencing, always give full publication information in the first footnote citation . For a published conference paper, this includes:

n. Author’s Name, “Paper Title,” in Title of Proceedings , ed. Editor Name(s) (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page number(s) for cited section.

In practice, then, the first citation of a conference paper would look like this:

1. Bill Riker, “Innovations in Seating,” in Proceedings of the Third Annual Behavioral Adaptations for Interstellar Travel Conference , ed. Jonathan Frakes (Santa Monica, CA: TNG Inc., 1987), 184.

The format differs slightly for an unpublished paper (e.g., one that you saw presented in person). This is quite rare, but if you need to cite one, you need to include the following information in the first footnote:

n. Author’s Name, “Paper Title” (paper presented at Name, Location and Date of Conference), page numbers (if relevant).

An unpublished paper would therefore be presented like this:

2. Deanna Troi, “Feeling Change: Design Guided by Empathy” (paper presented at The International Conference of Feeling, UCLA, Los Angeles, California, June 20-22 1992, 21.

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For repeat citations of a paper, you can use a shortened footnote format .

Bibliography

The information to include in your bibliography for a conference paper is roughly the same as in the first footnote. However, there are a few differences. For a published paper, the format is:

Surname, First Name. “Paper Title.” In Title of Proceedings , edited by Editor Name(s), page range. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year.

For an unpublished conference paper, meanwhile, the format is:

Surname, First Name. “Paper Title.” Paper presented at Name, Location and Date of Conference.

In practice, then, we would list a published and an unpublished conference paper as follows:

Riker, Bill. “Innovations in Seating.” In Proceedings of the Third Annual Behavioral Adaptations for Interstellar Travel Conference , edited by Jonathan Frakes, 180-201. Santa Monica, CA: TNG Inc., 1987.

Troi, Deanna. “Feeling Change: Design Guided by Empathy.” Paper presented at The International Conference of Feeling, UCLA, Los Angeles, California, June 20-22 1992.

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Cite A Conference proceedings in Chicago Manual of Style citation style

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  • Archive material
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Use the following template or our Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) Citation Generator to cite a conference proceedings. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator .

Notes-Bibliography Format

Reference list.

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Author-Date Format

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Chicago Style Guide 17th Edition: Conferences

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Reference:  

Author(s) Last name, First name, and remaining authors’ First names Last names. "Title of Paper." Paper presented at Conference name, Location, Month Year of conference. URL.   

Balado, Félix. "On the Shannon Capacity of DNA Data Embedding." Paper presented at 2010 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Dallas, TX, March 2010. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.2010.5495437 .

In-Text Citation:  Use a superscript number (like this: ¹) in the text at the place where you are indicating that you are citing from a source.

Felix Balado, at the 2010 Conference of the IEEE, suggested that the Shannon capacity of DNA data embedding has been greatly underestimated.³

# Author(s) First Name, Last name, and remaining authors’ First names Last names, "Title of Paper" (Conference paper/lecture, Conference name, Location, Month Day, Year of conference/lecture/paper). URL.

3. Félix Balado, "On the Shannon Capacity of DNA Data Embedding" (Conference paper, 2010 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Dallas, TX, March 14, 2010). http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICASSP.2010.5495437 .

Still unsure what in-text citation and referencing mean? Check here . 

Still unsure why you need to reference all this information? Check here . 

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Chicago A: Notes and Bibliography Style:  Conferences

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Conference papers

General rules:.

The exact format of references to conference papers is dependent upon whether the conference paper is published or unpublished, if it has a DOI, and how it is available (via a database, freely available on the internet, or in print). A paper included in the published conference proceedings is treated like a chapter in a book. If published in a journal, it is treated as an article.

The elements common to all references to a conference paper are:

Author Name

  • Use full author name as the first element in the reference.
  • Capitalise the title of the conference paper in headline style in quotation marks—not in italics.

Type of Paper

  • The type of paper (paper, poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc.) is included after the title of the paper.

Conference Details

  • The sponsorship, location, and date of the meeting is included after the type of paper.
  • This information is put in parentheses in a note but not in a bibliography. 

DOI or URL or Database Name

  • If the conference paper was consulted online, include the DOI if available, or a URL.
  • For conference papers retrieved from a commercial database, include the database name instead of URL.

Conference papers - online

The following is the general format of a reference to an online conference paper. Include the DOI if available, or a URL. For conference papers retrieved from a commercial database, include the database name instead of URL.

See the  general rules for conference papers  for more details. 

Footnote: Format and example

Note Number.  Author's First and Last Names,  "Title: Subtitle "   (type of paper presented at  Conference Name, Location, Date),   page(s) cited,  DOI or URL or Database Name.

1. Hannah Rohde, Roger Levy, and Andrew Kehler, “Implicit Causality Biases Influence Relative Clause Attachment” (poster presented at the 21st CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Chapel Hill, NC, March 13-15, 2008), http://idiom.ucsd.edu/~rlevy/papers/cuny2008/rohde-levy-kehler-2008-cuny.pdf.

Shortened /  Subsequent Footnote

Note Number.    Author's Last Names,  "Shortened Title ,"    page(s) cited.

2. Rohde , Levy, and Kehler , “Implicit Causality Biases. "  

First Author's Last Names, First Name, Other Authors' First Name, Last Name.  " Title : Subtitle ."   Type of paper presented at  Conference Name, Location, Date. DOI or URL or Database Name.

Rohde, Hannah, Roger Levy, and Andrew Kehler. “Implicit Causality Biases Influence Relative Clause Attachment.” Poster presented at the 21st CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Chapel Hill, NC, March 13-15, 2008. http://idiom.ucsd.edu/~rlevy/papers/cuny2008/rohde-levy-kehler-2008-cuny.pdf.

Conference papers - printed

The following is the general format of a reference to a conference paper in print. 

Note Number.  Author's First and Last Names,  "Title: Subtitle "   (Type of Paper presented at  Conference Name, Location, Date),   page(s) cited.

1. Linda A. Teplin et al., “Early Violent Death in Delinquent Youth: A Prospective Longitudinal Study” (paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society, La Jolla, CA, March 2005), 3.

2. Teplin  et al. ,  “Early Violent Death, "  4.

First Author's Last Names, First Name, Other Authors' First Name, Last Name.  " Title : Subtitle ."   Type of paper presented  at  Conference Name, Location, Date. 

Teplin, Linda A., Gary M. McClelland, Karen M. Abram, and Jason J. Washburn. “Early Violent Death in Delinquent Youth: A Prospective Longitudinal Study.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychology-Law Society, La Jolla, CA, March 2005.

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Citing a Conference Paper in APA Style | Format & Examples

Published on November 6, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on December 4, 2023.

The format for citing conference papers in APA Style depends on whether the paper has been published, and if so, in what format. Note that a separate format exists for citing dissertations . You can cite a conference paper easily by using our free APA Citation Generator .

To cite a paper that has been presented at a conference but not published, include the author’s name, the date of the conference, the title of the paper (italicized), “Paper presentation” in square brackets, the name and location of the conference, and a URL or DOI if available.

Cite a conference paper in APA Style now:

Table of contents, citing a conference paper published in a journal, citing a conference paper published in a book, frequently asked questions about apa style citations.

Conference papers are sometimes published in journals. To cite one of these, use the same format as you would for any journal article .

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cite conference paper chicago

Conference papers may also be collected in book form. In this case, you can cite one in the same way as you would cite a chapter from a book .

Include the DOI at the very end of the APA reference entry . If you’re using the 6th edition APA guidelines, the DOI is preceded by the label “doi:”. In the 7th edition , the DOI is preceded by ‘https://doi.org/’.

  • 6th edition: doi: 10.1177/0894439316660340
  • 7th edition: https://doi.org/ 10.1177/0894439316660340

APA citation example (7th edition)

Hawi, N. S., & Samaha, M. (2016). The relations among social media addiction, self-esteem, and life satisfaction in university students. Social Science Computer Review , 35 (5), 576–586. https://doi.org/10.1177/0894439316660340

In an APA journal citation , if a DOI (digital object identifier) is available for an article, always include it.

If an article has no DOI, and you accessed it through a database or in print, just omit the DOI.

If an article has no DOI, and you accessed it through a website other than a database (for example, the journal’s own website), include a URL linking to the article.

The abbreviation “ et al. ” (meaning “and others”) is used to shorten APA in-text citations with three or more authors . Here’s how it works:

Only include the first author’s last name, followed by “et al.”, a comma and the year of publication, for example (Taylor et al., 2018).

You may include up to 20 authors in a reference list entry .

When an article has more than 20 authors, replace the names prior to the final listed author with an ellipsis, but do not omit the final author:

Davis, Y., Smith, J., Caulfield, F., Pullman, H., Carlisle, J., Donahue, S. D., James, F., O’Donnell, K., Singh, J., Johnson, L., Streefkerk, R., McCombes, S., Corrieri, L., Valck, X., Baldwin, F. M., Lorde, J., Wardell, K., Lao, W., Yang, P., . . . O’Brien, T. (2012).

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If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2023, December 04). Citing a Conference Paper in APA Style | Format & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 19, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/apa-examples/conference-paper/

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Chicago Referencing – Citing a Conference Paper

Chicago Referencing – Citing a Conference Paper

4-minute read

  • 16th February 2017

Academic conferences are a great way to engage with cutting-edge research. But how should you cite a conference paper in your own work ?

(Photo: crystal710)

That depends on the system you’re using and whether the paper has been published. And in the case of Chicago referencing, it also depends on the version of the system used.

Author-Date Referencing (In-Text Citations)

The in-text citations for a conference paper are the same whether or not it has been published. This simply requires giving the surname of the author and the year of publication/presentation:

Airflows in urban environments are linked to architecture (West 2010).

The one difference between published and unpublished conference papers is that you should give page numbers when quoting a published paper:

One argument is that ‘tall buildings channel airflows in cities’ (West 2010, 187).

Citing an unpublished paper might sound unusual, but it can be handy if you’ve seen a presentation which hasn’t been published in conference proceedings .

Author-Date Referencing (Reference List)

When using author-date Chicago referencing, all cited conference papers should be included in a reference list at the end of your document. The format to use here for a published paper is:

Surname, First Name. Year of Publication. ‘Title of Paper’. In Title of Published Proceedings , edited by Editor Name(s), page numbers. City of Publication: Publisher.

In practice, this would look something like the following:

West, Kevin. 2010. ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’. In Proceedings of the 10th Annual Conference of Windy Cities , edited by Oliva Winsome, 185-192. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

If the proceedings were only published online, meanwhile, you’d give a DOI or URL in place of the place of publication/publisher.

For an unpublished paper, the format is slightly different:

Surname, First Name. Year of Presentation. ‘Title of Paper’. Presented at Name of Conference, location and date of conference.

Consequently, an unpublished paper would appear in the reference list as follows:

West, Kevin. 2010. ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’. Presented at The 10th Annual Conference of Windy Cities, Illinois, Chicago, October 18-21.

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Note that the name of the conference here is not italicised because it isn’t a published work.

Footnote Referencing (Footnote Citations)

With published conference papers, Chicago footnote referencing treats them as chapters in an edited book . As such, the first footnote citation for a paper would use the following format:

n. Author’s Name, ‘Paper Title’, in Title of Proceedings , ed. Editor Name(s) (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page number(s) for cited section.

You can then shorten non-consecutive citations of the same paper to just the author’s surname, paper title and page numbers:

1. Kevin West, ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’, in Proceedings of the 10th Annual Conference of Windy Cities , ed. Oliva Winsome (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2010), 190. 2. Shirley Church, Landscape and Architecture (New York: Penguin Books), 288. 3. West, ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’, 191-192.

For unpublished papers, the format to use is:

n. Author’s Name, ‘Paper Title’ (paper presented at Name of Conference, location and date of conference).

This would therefore appear as follows:

1. Kevin West, ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’ (paper presented at The 10th Annual Conference of Windy Cities, Illinois, Chicago, October 18-21, 2010).

Similar to published papers, you can shorten non-consecutive repeat citations to just the author’s surname and the title of the paper.

Footnote Referencing (Bibliography)

The formats in the bibliography for conference papers with footnote referencing are similar to those above, but with a few differences in the punctuation and position of the year.

A published conference paper would therefore appear in the bibliography as follows:

West, Kevin. ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’. In Proceedings of the 10th Annual Conference of Windy Cities , edited by Oliva Winsome, 185-192. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2010.

Meanwhile, you would list an unpublished version of the same paper as:

West, Kevin. ‘Understanding Urban Airflows’. Paper presented at The 10th Annual Conference of Windy Cities, Illinois, Chicago, October 18-21, 2010.

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Chicago 17th edition author-date

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Citing conference papers

Conference papers.

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As there are no directions given in Chicago author-date for conference papers, these instructions have been adapted from the notes-bibliography style.

A paper included in the published proceedings of a meeting may be treated like a book chapter. If published in a journal, it is treated as an article.

Details of the sponsorship, location, and date of the meeting at which a speech was given or a paper, slides, or poster presented follow the title. This information is put in parentheses in a note but not in a bibliography. If the information is available online, include a URL.

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Referencing style - Chicago: Conference Papers and Lectures

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How to reference conference papers

If you are referencing a conference paper which has been printed in a book as part of a collection of papers you can reference it like a chapter in a book.

The details below are for conference papers presented at a conference which have never been formally published.

1st citation 

First name Surname, “Title of conference paper,” (paper presented at Name of Conference, Place of Conference, Month Year), page number(s).

Gary Templin, “Creation stories of the Middle East,” (paper presented at Northwestern Annual Conference, Evanston, IL, April 26 2000), 17.

Subsequent citations

Surname, “Title of conference paper,” page number (s).

Templin, “Creation stories of the Middle East,” 21.

Bibliography

Surname, First name. “Title of conference paper.” Paper presented at Name of Conference, Place of Conference, Month Year.

Templin, Gary. “Creation stories of the Middle East.” Paper presented at Northwestern Annual Conference, Evanston, IL, April 26 2000.

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Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Miscellaneous Sources

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Welcome to the Purdue OWL

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Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

This section contains information on The Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. These resources follow the seventeenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style , which was issued in 2017.

This page covers types of media you may want to cite that don’t properly fit into any of the previous pages. If you are attempting to cite a source that you can find neither on this page nor any of the others in the Chicago section, consult the  CMOS  or model your citation on the example that most closely resembles your source.

This entry covers the Chicago Manual of Style guidelines for citing lectures, papers presented at meetings or poster sessions, and other similar presentations. Such entries often include the sponsorship, location, and date of the meeting following the title. When such texts are published, they should be treated like a chapter in a book or article in a journal. If the material is available online, include a URL at the end of your citation. The model is as follows:

Note that not all lectures have titles – if you are, for instance, citing a lecture given by a professor to his class, there may be no title to provide. In this case, feel free to skip that portion of the citation.

Visual Arts

This entry can be applied to paintings, sculptures, and all forms of visual art. (Music and other performing arts are covered under LINK:“Audiovisual Recordings and Other Multimedia.”) As usual, these must be cited with title, creator, and date as available, but the nature of these sources requires that you also provide medium, dimensions, and physical location, as follows:

There is some flexibility in portions of this citation. “Date” can be as simple as the year the piece of art was completed; it can be specific enough to include a season, month, or even a day. There might also be complications to acknowledge. In analog photography, for example, the date the photo was taken and the day it was developed into the print you are referencing are probably different; you might acknowledge that with something like “Spring 2013, printed 2018.” You may also have to give a date range if the specific year is unknown. “Location” might be a museum where it is on display, a private collection, or a publication in which it is reproduced; though, if possible, you should always cite the original rather than a reproduction.

You may find “Dimensions” unfamiliar, but most museums and the like will provide you with the medium and dimensions as part of the display or their website; these are standard attributes by which artwork is catalogued. Note that, when dealing with two-dimensional pieces such as paintings or photographs, you will use only height and width; “height” refers to the vertical dimension when the painting is hung on the wall in its correct orientation. Three-dimensional pieces will also include “depth.” Note that it is encouraged to provide dimensions in both imperial and metric units – use whichever the displaying institution gives, then follow it with a conversion in parentheses.

If images of the piece are available online, you should provide a URL at the end of your citation.  

Ancient, Sacred, Medieval, or Classic Texts

Some texts have been reprinted and re-translated so often over the centuries that conventional citations are counterproductive. If, for instance, you cited page 73 of Beowulf, your reader may be unable to find that reference – there are dozens of different translations and editions out there, very few of which share pagination. Even if you specify the edition, that may frustrate readers who have other editions. However, nearly all editions of Beowulf have the same line-numbering system, so citing line 2145 will be accessible to everyone. This same concept, on a larger scale, is what we call “classical citation”.

Classical citation applies only to old, widely-circulated texts with many varied editions. In classical citation, rather than follow page number, you simply follow whatever organizational scheme the author set up, as well as a line number for poetic works. This is used only in note citations – in the bibliography, you are expected to cite the book as normal, so that all the information on your specific edition is provided. The format is extremely simple, and goes as follows:

It is considerate to your reader to specify the edition, translator, numbering   system, or any other relevant information in the very first note citation:

Note that you should only include those details if they’re relevant – it is rare, for instance, that there are competing numbering systems that would require you to specify whose you are using. Often the editor is the translator, and therefore does not need to be cited twice. In all subsequent note citations, use only the brief classical citation.

The numbers by which you cite a specific passage in one of these texts vary depending on the type of text you are using. For an epic poem, you should use “book.line”; for classic plays, you should use “act.scene.line.”; for many medieval and classical texts, you should use “book.chapter.section”, if all three are provided. Some texts, like Plato’s or Aristotle’s works, have their own specialized numbering systems. Prose texts that were not divided into chapters and sections by the author are often just cited by paragraph number. Sacred texts generally use colons instead of periods and cite “chapter:verse” – however, if you are citing a sacred text from any religion you are not intimately familiar with, you should check and see what system the adherents of that religion have developed for their text, or at least follow conventions set down by authoritative scholarship.

There are a few additional quirks in classical citation. For instance, if you are citing the Bible, you must specify which version you are using in every note citation, due to the wide variation from one to another. Many classical texts and authors have official abbreviations you can use if you want to shorten your citations still further – the catalog of these abbreviations is maintained by the Oxford Classical Dictionary . If you feel it is necessary, you can also include labels such as “bk.”, “para.”, “line”, “chap.”, and so forth in the first note, in which case you would write it more like this:

The following examples cover a range of different types of texts that commonly use classical citation.

Reference Works

This entry covers publications such as dictionaries, encyclopediae, style guides, and the like. There are a few relevant differences between citing these works and a regular book; all of these differences apply to the note form, not the bibliography form, however, so we will only have examples in note format. Other than the differences noted below, you may cite reference works as you would any other publication of that medium.

First, any such work that is organized into sections will be cited by said sections, rather than by page number, like the classical works above:

Works organized into entries, such as dictionaries, will be cited by entry. However, rather than treat them like a chapter or section in a standard book, you treat them like a page number. This is marked by the abbreviation s.v., which stands for sub verbo, ‘under the word’. If your citation refers to multiple entries, indicate this by typing s.vv. instead, then listing the entries. Note that the s.v. is placed at the very end for print sources, but for online sources, it is followed by the “last modified”date and the URL.

Particularly well-known and reliable reference works, such as the Oxford English Dictionary, need not appear in the bibliography at all, but can be cited only in the notes. These citations only require the name of the work, the edition/year, and the entry in question:

  • Bibliography
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Conference paper: how to cite in Chicago Style – author-date (17th ed.)?

Create a spot-on reference in chicago 17 and 16.

Select a source type:

  • Journal article
  • Video (online)
  • All types...
  • Archival document
  • Book chapter
  • Complete reference
  • Conference paper
  • Copyright certificate
  • Dictionary entry
  • Dissertation / Thesis
  • Encyclopedia
  • Encyclopedia article
  • Extended abstract of dissertation
  • Newspaper article
  • Press release
  • Religious text
  • Social media post

General rules

Both systems of Chicago Style (notes and bibliography and author-date ) treat a conference paper published in conference proceedings as a chapter of a book , which is why the references for the two types of sources are quite similar. Use the following template to reference a conference abstract in a bibliography:

Author . Year of publication . " Paper Title ." In Conference Proceedings Title , edited by Editor , pages . City of publication : Publisher .

The place and date of conference are not given in the reference.

For a conference paper available online, add the URL address at the end of the reference:

Author . Year of publication . " Paper Title ." In Conference Proceedings Title , edited by Editor , pages . City of publication : Publisher . URL .

The date of access is given, if the date of publication is not stated in the source.

Example in a list of references

Sinnott, Richard O., Donghan Yang, Xueyang Ding, and Zhenyuan Ye. 2020. "Poisonous Spider Recognition through Deep Learning." In  ACSW '20: Proceedings of the Australasian Computer Science Week Multiconference , 14. New York: Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3373017.3373031 .

Other citation styles:

  • What is APA Style (7th ed.)?
  • Examples of bibliographic references in APA (7th ed.)
  • APA 7 vs APA 6: key differences
  • How to cite authors?
  • How to format the references page with APA (7th ed.)?
  • In-text citations
  • Dictionary/encyclopedia/dictionary entry/encyclopedia article
  • Dissertation (thesis)
  • Software / mobile app
  • Video game / computer game
  • What is MLA Style (8th ed.)?
  • Examples of references in works cited in MLA (8th ed.)
  • How to format the works cited page in MLA (8th ed.)?
  • What is Chicago Style?
  • Examples of bibliographic references in Chicago Style – notes and bibliography (17th ed.)
  • How to format the bibliography page?
  • Notes and in-text citations
  • Examples of bibliographic references in Chicago Style – author-date (17th ed.)
  • What is Harvard referencing style?
  • Examples of bibliographic references in Harvard style
  • Online video
  • What is IEEE Style?
  • Examples of bibliographic references in IEEE Style
  • How to format the references pages in IEEE Style?
  • What is Vancouver Style?
  • Examples of bibliographic references in Vancouver Style
  • MyExperience

Chicago Citation Style, 17th Edition: Lecture or Presentation

  • Bibliography
  • One Author or Editor
  • Multiple Authors or Editors
  • Author and Editor
  • Author and Translator
  • Organization as Author
  • Anonymous Work
  • Chapter from an Edited Work
  • Multivolume Work
  • Edition Other than the First
  • Dictionary or Encyclopedia
  • Journal Article
  • Magazine Article
  • Newspaper Article
  • Book Review
  • Basic Webpage
  • Blogs and Social Media
  • Government Website
  • Audio/Video Recording
  • Online Multimedia
  • Interview or Personal Communication
  • Lecture or Presentation
  • Primary Source Published in an Edited Collection
  • Thesis or Dissertation
  • Pamphlet or Brochure
  • Sacred Text
  • Indirect Source
  • Government Document
  • Paintings, Illustrations, Tables
  • AI Generated Content

Lecture or Presentation (14.217)

N:            1. Gail Edwards, "Regulating Children's Print Culture in Postwar Canada" (presentation, Biennial Conference of the Canadian History of Education Association, Saskatoon, SK, October 23–26, 2014).

B:    Edwards, Gail. "Regulating Children's Print Culture in Postwar Canada." Presentation at the Biennial              Conference of the Canadian History of Education Association, Saskatoon, SK, October 23–26, 2014.

Help & Guide Contents

Home General Guidelines     Notes     Bibliography Books     One Author or Editor     Multiple Authors or Editors     Author and Editor     Author and Translator     Organization as Author     Anonymous Work     Chapter from an Edited Work     Multivolume Work     Edition Other than the First     Dictionary or Encyclopedia     E-Book Articles     Journal Article     Magazine Article     Newspaper Article     Book Review Websites     Basic Webpage     Blogs and Social Media     Government Website Audiovisual Media     Audio/Video Recording     Online Multimedia Other Sources     Interview or Personal Communication     Lecture or Presentation    Primary Source Published in an Edited Collection     Thesis or Dissertation     Pamphlet or Brochure     Sacred Text     Indirect Source     Government Document     Paintings, Illustrations, Tables Plagiarism

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The ultimate guide to citing anything in chicago style, everything you ever needed to know about citing sources from the chicago manual of style, the basics of citing in chicago style.

The Chicago Manual of Style, currently in its 16th edition, was created to help researchers properly cite their sources. There are two types of referencing styles in Chicago: 1) Notes and Bibliography and 2) Author-Date.

This guide displays the Notes and Bibliography style of referencing and is not associated with the official publishers of the style.

Need help with other styles? Our thorough MLA format and APA format guides are available for all of your writing and citing needs!

Creating a Bibliography in Chicago Style

The bibliography is a list of all the sources used in the paper. The list includes the important publication details of the sources. The bibliography must also follow this format:

  • The citation list or bibliography must be single spaced.
  • The last names of the authors must be arranged alphabetically.
  • The second line of the source must be indented.

Examples of Citing Different Sources in Chicago Style

Generally, Chicago citations require:

  • Title of book/article
  • Title of newspaper/journal
  • Publication year
  • Publication month and date
  • City of publication
  • Date of access
  • Page numbers
  • URL or Name of Database

How to Create Footnotes and Endnotes for Chicago Style

If you’re wondering how to format Chicago in-text citations, Notes and Bibliography formatting requires writers to use footnotes and endnotes. These footnotes and endnotes acknowledge the different sources used in the work.

When a source is used in a research paper, a roman numeral is placed at the end of the borrowed information as superscript (it is smaller than the normal line of text and raised). That number correlates with a footnote or endnote.

  • Footnotes are found at the bottom of the page
  • Endnotes are added at the end of the chapter or project
  • A footnote or endnote contains the complete citation information
  • The matching number in the footnote or endnote is normal sized and not raised
  • It is up to the discretion of the writer to either place the citation at the bottom of the page where the superscript is placed (a footnote) or to place all citations together at the end of the work (endnotes)
One would wonder, "Would young Einstein be characterized as belonging somewhere on the autism spectrum? Would Erdos have been given a diagnosis of A.D.H.D.?" ¹

Chicago style footnotes are placed at the bottom of the page:

  • Silver, Nate. "Beautiful Minds." The New York Times. July 13, 2013. Accessed August 04, 2015. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/14/books/review/the-boy-who-loved-math-and-on-a-beam-of-light.html?ref=books&_r=0 .

If a source is used more than once in a research project, follow these guidelines:

  • When used again, instead of writing out the complete citation for a second time in the footnote, only include: the author’s last name, the title or a phrase for the title (if it’s more than four words), and the page number(s) that were used. This will reduce the bulk of citation information in the paper.
  • Cohen, Micah, "Rubio is Losing Support Among Republican Voters." FiveThirtyEight. July 09, 2013. Accessed August 04, 2015. http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/rubio-is-losing-support-among-republican-voters/
  • Wolf, Leon H. "Marco Rubio's Campaign Must Adapt or Die." RedState. August 04, 2015. Accessed August 04, 2015. http://www.redstate.com/2015/08/04/marco-rubios-campaign-must-adapt-die/ .
  • Cohen, "Rubio Losing Support"

If a source is used consecutively, follow these guidelines for shortened citation and ibid :

If you are citing the same source continually throughout your text, use a shortened version of the full citation in your footnotes.

Previous versions of the style used the abbreviation “ibid,” short for “ibidem.” Ibidem is a Latin word that means “in the same place.” It was used when referring to a source that was just cited within a document (without other sources in between). Writers would use ibid instead of writing out the source information again. This was meant to save space since it’s fewer characters than citing the source again.

In the current version of Chicago, the 17th version, ibid is accepted but not preferred. This is because ibid requires readers to go back and search for the previous source cited, an inconvenience which outweighs the benefits of shortening the citation. Also, shortened citations are compact, so using ibid doesn’t always save line space.

Shortened citations

The first mention of a source should include all relevant information (e.g., full author name(s), full title, publisher, date published, etc.).

Subsequent mentions should be a shortened version using this formula:

Last Name, Title of the Work , page number(s).

Mentions after the shortened form can use the abbreviated formula:

Last Name, page number(s).

If there are two or three authors, list their full names in the order they appear in the source. If there are more than three authors, list the first author’s name followed by “et al.”

Examples of using shortened citations (preferred format in the 17th Edition):

  • Philip R. Cateora et al., International Marketing (New York: McGraw Hill, 2020), 292-294.
  • Cateora et al., International Marketing , 28-29.
  • Cateora et al., 28-29.
  • Cateora et al., 377.

Long titles that are more than four words are usually shortened. Focus on keeping key words from the title and omitting any beginning “a” or “the.” Examples:

  • And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street = Mulberry Street
  • Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe = Fried Green Tomatoes

If you are using the discontinued ibid notation, here are a few guidelines:

  • When the same source is used consecutively, instead of typing in the citation information again, use the abbreviation “ibid.” Add the page numbers immediately following.
  • If the same source AND same page number are used consecutively, simply write “Ibid.”

Same example above, but using ibid:

  • Philip R. Cateora et al, International Marketing (New York: McGraw Hill, 2020), 292-294.

Another example with two sources that were mentioned earlier in the text:

  • Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See (New York: Scribner, 2014), 82-84.
  • Tatiana de Rosnay, Sarah's Key (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2007), 24-27.
  • Ibid., 133-134.
  • Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See , 397-401.
  • Ibid., 405.
  • Ibid., 411.

For further clarification on the Chicago in-text citation style of footnotes and endnotes, consult the Chicago Manual of Style's website . This site is full of helpful pages, so if you’re tempted to head to Google to type in, “in-text citations Chicago,” take a peek at the official site first.

Creating Your Citations in Chicago Style

As mentioned, when you're following The Chicago Manual of Style, you'll be required to create a list of all sources used in your paper. Even though full bibliographic information can be found in the footnotes and endnotes, it is still acceptable, and often required by instructors, to create a bibliography. The bibliography is placed at the end of an assignment.

How to Cite a Print Book in Chicago Style

In the footnotes and endnotes:

First name Last name, Title of Book (Publication Place: Publisher, Year), page range.

In the bibliography:

Last name, First name. Title of book . Publication Place: Publisher, Year.

Example of Chicago Style for Books with One Author

Sam Staggs, Born to Be Hurt: The Untold Story of Imitation of Life (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2009), 84.

Staggs, Sam. Born to Be Hurt: The Untold Story of Imitation of Life. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2009.

Don’t forget, Citation Machine allows you to generate Chicago citations for books quickly and accurately.

Example of Chicago Citation for Books with Multiple Authors

Ella Shohat and Robert Stam, Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media (London: Routledge,1994) 24-28.

Shohat, Ella, and Robert Stam. Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media . London: Routledge, 1994.

How to Cite Chapters or Articles from a Book in Chicago Style

First name, Last name of Chapter Author, “Chapter or Article Title,” in Book Title , ed. First Name Last Name of Editor (Publication Place: Publisher, Year), page range.

Last name, First name. "Chapter Title." In Book Title , edited by First Name Last Name, page range. Publication Place: Publisher, Year.

Looking for a simple and easy-to-use Chicago citation maker? Head to our homepage and start building your Chicago format references with ease!

Example of Chicago Citation for Chapters in a Book

Laura Aymerich-Franch and Maddalena Fedele, "Student's Privacy Concerns on the Use of Social Media in Higher Education," in Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education, ed. Vledlena Benson and Stephanie Morgan (Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference, 2014), 35-36.

Aymerich-Franch, Laura, and Maddalena Fedele. "Student's Privacy Concerns on the Use of Social Media in Higher Education." In Cutting-Edge Technologies and Social Media Use in Higher Education, edited by Vledlena Benson and Stephanie Morgan, 35-36. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference, 2014.

How to Cite Online E-books in Chicago Style

When citing e-books, include the URL or the name of the database. The URL or database name should be the last part of the citation.

First name Last name, Title of e-book (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page range, URL, Database Name.

Last name, First name. Title of Book. Publication Place: Publisher, Year. URL, Name of Database.

Example of Chicago Citation for E-Books

Michael J. Baker, The Marketing Book (Burlington, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2002), 89, https://htbiblio.yolasite.com/resources/Marketing%20Book.pdf .

Baker, Michael J. The Marketing Book. Burlington, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2002. https://htbiblio.yolasite.com/resources/Marketing%20Book.pdf .

If you understand how to structure your references easily, thanks to this thorough guide, and are looking for help with the written portion of your paper, look no further! There are tons of Citation Machine grammar guides to help you write with ease. Here’s just one of our many useful pages: Positive & Negative Adjectives .

How to Cite E-books in Chicago Style E-books from a Kindle or E-book Reader

If there aren’t any clearly labeled page numbers, use chapter numbers or titles, section numbers or titles, or any other established numbering system in the text. It’s also acceptable to omit page information from Chicago style citations if there aren’t clearly labeled page numbers.

First name Last name, Title of the Book (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page range, Type of E-reader

Last name, First name. Title of book . Publication Place: Publisher, Year. Type of e-reader.

Example of Chicago Citation for Kindle or E-book Reader

Corina Bomann, The Moonlight Garden (Washington: AmazonCrossing, 2016), chap. 8, Kindle.

Bomann, Corina. The Moonlight Garden . Washington: AmazonCrossing, 2016. Kindle.

How to Cite Print Journals in Chicago Style

First name Last name, "Title of Article," Journal Title Volume Number, No. of issue (Year): Page range.

Chicago style citation in the bibliography:

Last name, First name. "Title of Article," Journal Title Volume Number, No. of issue (Year): Page range.

Example of Chicago Citation for Print Journals

Damien O'Brien and Brian Fitzgerald, "Digital Copyright Law in a YouTube World," Internet Law Bulletin 9, no. 6 (2007): 71-74.

O'Brien, Damien, and Brian Fitzgerald, "Digital Copyright Law in a YouTube World." Internet Law Bulletin 9, no. 6 (2007): 71-74.

If you’re come this far and you’re still searching for in-text citation Chicago information, remember, this style uses footnotes and endnotes! Scroll up to find out more!

How to Cite Online or Database Journals in Chicago Style

First name Last name, "Article Title," Journal Title Volume Number, Issue No.(Year): Page range. URL or Name of Database.

Last name, First name. "Article Title." Journal Title Volume Number, Issue No. (Year): Page range. URL or Name of Database.

Example of Chicago Citation for Online or Database Journals

Trine Schreiber, "Conceptualizing Students’ Written Assignments in the Context of Information Literacy and Schatzki’s Practice Theory," Journal of Documentation 70, no. 3 (2014): 346-363. https://doi.org/10.1108/JD-01-2013-0002 .

Schreiber, Trine. "Conceptualizing Students’ Written Assignments in the Context of Information Literacy and Schatzki’s Practice Theory." Journal of Documentation 70, no. 3 (2014): 346-363. https://doi.org/10.1108/JD-01-2013-0002 .

Our Citation Machine Chicago citation generator helps you create your references in just a few clicks. Give it a whirl and watch the magic unfold!

How to Cite Print Magazines in Chicago Style

First name Last name, "Article Title," Magazine Title, Full Date, page range.

Last name, First name. "Article Title." Magazine Title, Full Date.

Example of Chicago Citation for Print Magazines

George J. Church, "Sunny Mood at Midsummer: Americans Take a Brighter View of Reagan," _Time, July 18, 1983, 56-59.

Church, George J. "Sunny Mood at Midsummer: Americans Take a Brighter View of Reagan" Time, July 18, 1983.

How to Cite Online Magazines in Chicago Style

First name, Last name, "Article Title," Title of Magazine, Full Date, URL.

Chicago style bibliography structure:

Last name, First name. "Article Title" Magazine Title, Full Date, URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Online Magazines

Bill Donahue. “King of the Mountains,” Backpacker, September/October 2019, 76-82, http://backpacker.eoncontent.ebscohost.com/2226647#&pageSet=39

Donahue, Bill. “King of the Mountains.” Backpacker, September/October 2019. http://backpacker.eoncontent.ebscohost.com/2226647#&pageSet=39

How to Cite a Web Page in Chicago Style

Creating a footnote, endnote, or bibliographic information for web content isn’t always necessary. It’s acceptable to simply mention the source in the written portion of the paper. For example, “The Marco Polo page on History’s website, last updated on March 6, 2019, describes his travels along the Silk Road while....” Include formal Chicago citation style references if you or your professor prefers to do so.

A bit more:

  • If the website page is missing a date of publication, include the date the source was last modified or accessed in the footnote and endnote.
  • If the website page is missing the name of the author, begin the footnote with the “Title of the Article or Page.”
First name Last name of Author, "Title of Article or Page," Title of Website, Date published or last modified or accessed, URL.

Last name, First name or Organization Name. "Title of Article or Page." Title of Website. Date published or last modified or accessed. URL.

Figuring out how to style web references can be tricky, but thanks to our Chicago citation machine, we’ve made the whole process much easier for you. Try it out!

Example of Chicago Citation for a Web Page

Sujan Patel, "15 Must-have Marketing Tools for 2015," Entrepreneur, January 12, 2015. http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/241570 .

Patel, Sujan. “15 Must-have Marketing Tools for 2015.” Entrepreneur. January 12, 2015. http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/241570 .

Don’t forget, Citation Machine allows you to generate Chicago citations for websites quickly and accurately.

How to Cite The Bible or Religious Texts in Chicago Style

Bible references are often displayed in the text of a paper (similar to web content) or in footnotes and endnotes. Formal bible references in bibliographies are not necessary.

Abbreviated Title of Book, Chapter:Verse (Edition).

Example of Chicago Citation for Bible

2 Cor. 11:7 (New Standard Version).

If you’re looking for other resources to help you with the written portion of your paper, we have quite a few handy grammar guides. Two of our favorites? Adjectives starting with X and List of verbs .

How to Cite Blogs in Chicago Style

*According to the 17th edition of the manual, blogs are not typically cited in bibliographies. They are generally cited in the footnotes/endnotes section. Of course, if the writer or professor prefers a full bibliographic reference, one can be created.

Style notes and bibliographic references the same way as you would an online newspaper, but include (blog) in parentheses immediately following the title of the blog.

First name Last name, "Title of Blog Post," Title of Blog (blog), Title of Larger Blog, if part of a larger one, Month Day Year of post, URL.

Last Name, First Name. "Title of the Blog." Name of Blog Site (blog). Title of Larger Blog, if part of a larger one, Month Day Year of post. URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Blogs

Shannon Miller, "Valentine Ideas Using Digital Tools, Hands, Creativity, and a Little Love for Padlet," The Library Voice (blog), January 20, 2016, http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/2016/01/valentine-ideas-using-digital-tools.html .

Miller, Shannon. "Valentine Ideas Using Digital Tools, Hands, Creativity, and a Little Love for Padlet." The Library Voice, January 20, 2016. http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/2016/01/valentine-ideas-using-digital-tools.html .

Chicago style bibliographies aren’t as complicated as they seem, especially when you have a generator to do the work for you. Head to our homepage and try ours out!

How to Cite TV Broadcasts in Chicago Style

Title of Series , episode number, “Title of Episode,” directed by First Name Last Name, written by First Name Last Name, featuring First Names Last Names of actors, aired Month Day, Year, on Station Name, URL.

Last Name, First Name, dir. Title of Series . Season Number, episode number, “Title of Episode.” Aired Month Day, Year, on Station Name. URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Broadcasts

Riverdale , episode 15, “American Dreams,” directed by Gabriel Correra, written by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, featuring KJ Apa, Lili Reinhart, and Cole Sprouse, aired March 13, 2019, on CW.

Bibliography Chicago style:

Correra, Gabriel, dir. Riverdale . Season 3, episode 15, “American Dreams.” Aired March 13, 2019, on CW.

How to Cite a Case Study in Chicago Style

First name Last name. Title of Case Study. (Publication Place: Publisher, Year).

Last name, First name. Title of Case Study.

Example of Chicago Citation for Case Study

Peter Finn. Disulfiram.

Finn, Peter. Disulfiram.

How to Cite Conference Proceedings in Chicago Style

First Name Last Name, “Title of Conference Paper” (format, Title of Conference, Location, Full Date).

Last name, First name. “Title of Conference Paper.” Format presented at Title of Conference, Location, Date. URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Conference Paper

Craig Myerson, “Historical Markings in New Castle, Delaware” (Power-Point presentation, The University of Delaware, Newark, DE, June 18, 2019.

Myerson, Craig. “Historical Markings in New Castle, Delaware.” Power-point presentation presented at The University of Delaware, Newark, DE, June 18, 2019.

How to Cite Court or Legal Cases in Chicago Style

The 17th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style recommends referring to The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation , or the ALWD Guide to Legal Citation to learn how to create court or legal references. Both guides are widely used by those in legal fields and have become the standard for referencing legal cases.

The examples below reflect the format found in The Bluebook .

Legal cases are rarely documented in bibliographies, usually only in notes.

Plaintiff v. Defendant, Court Case Number (Abbreviated Name of the Court. Year).

Example of Chicago Citation for Legal Cases

Michael Clum v. Jackson National Life Insurance Co., 10-000126-CL (Ingham Cty. 2011).

How to Cite Dictionary and Encyclopedia Entries in Chicago Style

According to The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition, well-known reference books, including major dictionaries and encyclopedias, are normally cited in notes rather than bibliographies. Lesser known reference books can be cited in the bibliography.

The abbreviation "s.v." means sub verbo , which is Latin for "under the word."

Chicago style formatting in the footnotes and endnotes:

Name of dictionary or encyclopedia , Numbered ed. (Year), s.v. “term.”

If found online:

Name of dictionary or encyclopedia , s.v. "term," accessed Month Day Year, url.

Last name, First name of Author. Title of Dictionary or Encyclopedia . Numbered ed. Location of Publisher: Publisher, Year.

Example of Chicago Citation for Dictionary and Encyclopedia Entries

Encyclopedia Britannica , s.v. “pressure,” accessed September 15, 2019, https://www.britannica.com/science/pressure .

Gover, Emily. Encyclopedia of Birds . 4th ed. New York: Chegg, 2016.

How to Cite Dissertations in Chicago Style

First name Last name, "Title of Dissertation" (type of paper, school, year), url.

Last name, First name. "Title of Dissertation." Type of Paper, School, Year. URL or Database(Identification Number).

Example of Chicago Citation for Dissertations

Michele Kirschenbaum, "Young Students' Online Searching Capabilities" (master's thesis, Drexel University, 2009).

Kirschenbaum, Michele. "Young Students' Online Searching Capabilities." Master's thesis, Drexel University, 2009.

How to Cite DVDs, Video, and Film in Chicago Style

Title , directed by First Name Last name (Year; City, State Abbrev: Producer), Format.

Last Name, First Name, dir. Title . Year; City, State Abbrev: Producer, Year. Format.

Example of Chicago Citation for Film, DVDs, or Videos

_Home Lone , directed by Chris Columbus (1990; Los Angeles, CA: 20th Century Fox), DVD.

Columbus, Chris, dir. Home Alone . 1990; Los Angeles, CA: 20th Century Fox. DVD.

Don’t forget, Citation Machine allows you to generate Chicago citations for films quickly and accurately.

How to Cite Facebook Pages in Chicago Style

Title of Facebook Page, “Text of Post,” Facebook, Month Day, Year, URL.

Title of Facebook Page. “Text of Post.” Facebook, Month Day, Year. URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Facebook Post

Awakenings, “Maceo Plex gave us goosebumps during Awakenings Festival! We can't wait to hear what he has in store during Maceo Plex x Lone Romantic | Awakenings ADE Elementenstraat on October 19:awak.enin.gs/2KMxDCH,” Facebook, September 12, 2019, https://www.facebook.com/pg/awakenings/posts/?ref=page_internal .

Awakenings. “Maceo Plex gave us goosebumps during Awakenings Festival! We can't wait to hear what he has in store during Maceo Plex x Lone Romantic | Awakenings ADE Elementenstraat on October 19:awak.enin.gs/2KMxDCH.” Facebook, September 12, 2019. https://www.facebook.com/pg/awakenings/posts/?ref=page_internal .

How to Cite Government Publications in Chicago Style

Title of Publication , prepared by Organization (City, State Abbrev, Year).

Firm/Department. Title of Publication . City, State Abbrev, Year.

Example of Chicago Citation for Government Publication

Audit of the Federal Bureau of Prisons Annual Financial Statements Fiscal Year 2014 , prepared by The Department of Justice (Washington, DC, 2014).

Department of Justice. Audit of the Federal Bureau of Prisons Annual Financial Statements Fiscal Year 2014 . Washington, DC, 2014.

How to Cite Interviews in Chicago Style

Published Interviews are treated in Chicago format style like an article in a magazine or a newspaper. Use one of those formats to cite your interview.

How to Cite an E-mail in Chicago Style

According to The Chicago Manual of Style , 17th edition, personal communications, such as letters, e-mails, text messages, and phone calls are usually referenced in the footnotes and endnotes or explained in the text of the paper. They are rarely listed in the Chicago style bibliography. In addition, an e-mail address belonging to an individual should be omitted, unless given permission by its owner.

Individual's First name Last name, type of communication, Month Day Year of correspondence.

Example of Chicago Citation for E-mail

Michele Kirschenbaum, e-mail message to author, January 18, 2016.

How to Cite Musical Recordings in Chicago Style

"Title of Song," Year of recording date, Platform, track number on Artist’s Name, Album Title, Producer, Year.

Last name, First name of performer. Title of Album. Recorded Year. Producer.

Example of Chicago Citation for Recordings

"Sucker,” Spotify, track 1, on Jonas Brothers, Happiness Begins , Republic Records, 2019.

Jonas Brothers. Happiness Begins . 2019. Republic Records.

Still wondering how to style a Chicago in-text citation? Remember, this style uses footnotes and endnotes! Head to the top of this page to learn more!

How to Cite Online Videos in Chicago Style

First name Last name of individual who posted the video, “Title of Video,” Producer, published on Month Day, Year, Site video, Length, URL.

Last name, First name. "Title of Video." Producer. Published on Month Day, Year. Site video, Length. URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Online Videos

“Habitats Work in Texas After Hurricane Harvey,” Habitat for Habitat for Humanity, published on September 11, 2019, YouTube video, 01:35, https://youtu.be/EPPALfWYGRo .

“Habitats Works in Texas After Hurricane Harvey.” Habitat for Humanity. Published on September 11, 2019. YouTube video, 01:35. https://youtu.be/EPPALfWYGRo .

How to Cite Images in Chicago Style

First name Last name, Title of Image , Year, format, Location, State, URL.

Last Name, First Name. Title of Image . Date. Format. Location, State, URL.

Example of Chicago Citation for Photographs and Images

Jerome Liebling, May Day , New York, 1948, photograph, The Jewish Museum, New York.
Liebling, Chris. May Day , New York. 1948. Photograph. The Jewish Museum, New York.

How to Cite Live Performances in Chicago Style

Since most live performances are not retrievable by the reader, simply refer to them in the text of the paper or in the notes, and omit it from the bibliography. If it’s a recorded performance, follow the Chicago style format for musical recordings.

Title of Play , music and lyrics by First Name Last Name, dir. First Name Last name, chor. Name of Theatre, City, State Abbrev, Date of Live Performance.

Example of Chicago Citation for Live Performances

The Lion King , Julie Taymor, dir. Garth Fagan, chor. Minskoff Theatre, New York, NY, August 8, 2019.

How to Cite Podcasts in Chicago Style

When citing podcasts in Chicago Style, treat it as an article in a periodical or a chapter in a book. If found online, include the url.

How to Cite Poems in Chicago Style

When citing poems in Chicago Style, cite it as you would a chapter in a book.

How to Cite Presentations and Lectures in Chicago Style

Follow the same guidelines as in the “Conference Papers” section above.

How to Cite Sheet Music in Chicago Style

According to the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, cite sheet music the same way as you cite books.

Once you’ve styled each and every reference, take a minute to run your paper through our plagiarism checker . It’s the perfect go-to resource when you’re in need of another set of eyes to scan your paper!

Updated January 8, 2020

Written and edited by Michele Kirschenbaum and Wendy Ikemoto. Michele Kirschenbaum has been an awesome school librarian since 2006 and is an expert in citing sources. Wendy Ikemoto has a master’s degree in library and information science and has been working for Citation Machine since 2012.

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  1. Conference Papers

    Conference Papers - Chicago - Referencing Guide - Help and Support at Murdoch University Chicago - Referencing Guide Format Standard format for citation Conference paper in print proceedings: Author of Paper, A., and B. Author of Paper. Year. "Title of Paper ."

  2. How to Cite a Conference Paper in Chicago/Turabian

    1. Author First Name Last Name, "Title of the Paper" (paper presentation, Name of Conference, Location of Conference, Month Day, Year of conference). Bibliography: Last name, First name. "Title of the Paper." Paper presented at the Name of Conference, Location of Conference, Month and year of conference. Example: Note: 1.

  3. Chicago Referencing

    But how do you cite a conference paper? In this post, we explain this using Chicago footnote referencing. Footnote Citations In Chicago referencing, always give full publication information in the first footnote citation. For a published conference paper, this includes: n.

  4. Cite A Conference proceedings in Chicago Manual of Style citation style

    Cite A Conference proceedings in Chicago Manual of Style citation style Use the following template or our Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) Citation Generator to cite a conference proceedings. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides.

  5. Conference papers

    Citing conference papers A paper included in the published proceedings of a meeting may be treated like a book chapter. If published in a journal, it is treated as an article. Details of the sponsorship, location, and date of the meeting at which a speech was given or a paper, slides, or poster presented follow the title.

  6. Conference paper: how to cite in Chicago Style?

    If you need to cite the conference proceedings as a whole and not a single paper therein, use the form for referencing a book on our website's homepage. Examples of references in a bibliography Sinnott, Richard O., Donghan Yang, Xueyang Ding, and Zhenyuan Ye. "Poisonous Spider Recognition through Deep Learning."

  7. LibGuides: Chicago Style Guide 17th Edition: Conferences

    In-Text Citation: Use a superscript number (like this: ¹) in the text at the place where you are indicating that you are citing from a source. Example: Felix Balado, at the 2010 Conference of the IEEE, suggested that the Shannon capacity of DNA data embedding has been greatly underestimated.³ Footnote:

  8. Chicago Style

    Chicago Style | Citing a Conference Paper | Excelsior OWL Citation & Documentation » Chicago Style » Chicago Notes & Bibliography » Paper from a Meeting or Conference Paper from a Meeting or Conference | 17th Edition The first entry is a sample footnote/endnote as it would appear the first time that a work is cited.

  9. Chicago A: Notes and Bibliography Style: Conferences

    Use full author name as the first element in the reference. Title Capitalise the title of the conference paper in headline style in quotation marks—not in italics. Type of Paper The type of paper (paper, poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc.) is included after the title of the paper. Conference Details

  10. Chicago Manual of Style 17th Edition

    Author-Date Sample Paper. NB Sample Paper. In addition to consulting The Chicago Manual of Style (17th edition) for more information, students may also find it useful to consult Kate L. Turabian's Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (8th edition). This manual, which presents what is commonly known as the "Turabian ...

  11. Citing a Conference Paper in APA Style

    To cite a paper that has been presented at a conference but not published, include the author's name, the date of the conference, the title of the paper (italicized), "Paper presentation" in square brackets, the name and location of the conference, and a URL or DOI if available. Cite a conference paper in APA Style now: Table of contents

  12. How to Cite a Conference in Chicago

    Citing a conference in Chicago most commonly follows the rules for citing a lecture. Select " Lecture " in our free citation generator below. If a lecture doesn't quite reflect your source, use the drop-down to select another one. Citation Information Citation Style APA MLA Chicago Source Contributor First Name * Middle Initial Last Name *

  13. Chicago Referencing

    When using author-date Chicago referencing, all cited conference papers should be included in a reference list at the end of your document. The format to use here for a published paper is: Surname, First Name. Year of Publication. 'Title of Paper'. In Title of Published Proceedings, edited by Editor Name (s), page numbers.

  14. Conference papers

    Citing conference papers As there are no directions given in Chicago author-date for conference papers, these instructions have been adapted from the notes-bibliography style. A paper included in the published proceedings of a meeting may be treated like a book chapter. If published in a journal, it is treated as an article.

  15. Referencing style

    Last Updated: Jan 23, 2024 1:06 PM https://guides.library.uwa.edu.au/Chicago_referencing Print Page Tags: author date style, chicago_referencing, chicago_style, footnote style, referencing Guides for help with finding, using and referencing information for your academic work

  16. Referencing style

    UWA Library Library Guides Referencing style - Chicago Conference Papers and Lectures Referencing style - Chicago: Conference Papers and Lectures Conference Papers and Lectures If a book is available in more than one format (i.e. print, ebook), cite the version you consulted. Last Updated: Jan 23, 2024 1:06 PM

  17. Conference papers

    1st citation . First name Surname, "Title of conference paper," (paper presented at Name of Conference, Place of Conference, Month Year), page number(s). Gary Templin, "Creation stories of the Middle East," (paper presented at Northwestern Annual Conference, Evanston, IL, April 26 2000), 17. Subsequent citations

  18. PDF Instruction Section Chicago Manual of Style, Author-Date System Quick Guide

    The following guide provides citation examples in the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) author-date system for the most commonly cited reference types in Instruction Section ... Conference Papers, Panels, and Presentations (CMOS 14.226) Author. Year. "Title of Paper." Paper presented at type of meeting of Name of Organization,

  19. Miscellaneous Sources

    This entry covers the Chicago Manual of Style guidelines for citing lectures, papers presented at meetings or poster sessions, and other similar presentations. ... Annual Convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA, March 12, 2009). B: ... Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Conference on ...

  20. Conference paper: how to cite in Chicago Style

    General rules. Both systems of Chicago Style (notes and bibliography and author-date) treat a conference paper published in conference proceedings as a chapter of a book, which is why the references for the two types of sources are quite similar.Use the following template to reference a conference abstract in a bibliography:

  21. Chicago Citation Style, 17th Edition: Lecture or Presentation

    Plagiarism Lecture or Presentation (14.217) N: 1. Gail Edwards, "Regulating Children's Print Culture in Postwar Canada" (presentation, Biennial Conference of the Canadian History of Education Association, Saskatoon, SK, October 23-26, 2014). B: Edwards, Gail. "Regulating Children's Print Culture in Postwar Canada." Presentation at the Biennial

  22. Citing a Conference in CHICAGO

    Cite a Conference. Citation Machine® helps students and professionals properly credit the information that they use. Cite sources in APA, MLA, Chicago, Turabian, and Harvard for free.

  23. Chicago Citation Generator

    The Chicago Manual of Style, currently in its 16th edition, was created to help researchers properly cite their sources. There are two types of referencing styles in Chicago: 1) Notes and Bibliography and 2) Author-Date. This guide displays the Notes and Bibliography style of referencing and is not associated with the official publishers of the ...